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"Beachcombing" the Ski Slopes

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I like to hike the slopes of Crystal Mt., Washington. It's fascinating to see what the terrain looks like without the snow. Streams flowing, lakes exposed, grassy meadows, etc. And I always keep a lookout for dropped items. Here is a short list:

I figure other folks must get up there to find the good stuff. And area staff probably pick up the poles and mittens from under the lifts.

- Found a cell phone during ski season. While I was carrying it down, the phone rang, a friend of the owner, so I was able to turn it in with the name of the liftie that it belonged to.

- A pewter flask, with initials, crushed by the snowcats? I would guess that had been there for years and is probably still there.

- Money, first coins exposed are at the base as the snow melts back. I leave that for the little kids to pick up. After ski season, folks take the kids up to play in the snow while the adults sun themselves in lounge chairs in the parking lot. One the slopes I find pennies, dimes and an occaisional quarter.

- Hmm... lots of chapstick tubes and an occaisional bic lighter.

- Skis... found one ski. A 140cm kids ski, brand new Salomon, with a boot still in the binding, the inner boot missing. My guess was that some kid unbuckled his boots and lost one while riding the chair. Carried it down to the customer service office. Looking in through a glass door I can see a handful of single skis lined up. Some are pretty nice powder skis.

- A five inch linch pin with a retaining clip.

- Keys... found a full set of keys with a remote door opener. Looked like it had been there for a couple of seasons, on Rolling Knolls which probably isn't hiked too much. I had the bright idea of hanging this key set on the door handle at the customer service office at the base. When I got there, there were two other sets of keys already hanging there.

- Old lift ticket tags. Sometimes I look at them to see how many seasons back they go.

- An amazing number of broken buckles, pieces off bindings, etc., items that nobody wants to pick up.

- Funny looking metal stands, with a carrousel of chains hanging off of them. Finally figured out these are for frisbee golf.

- Elk droppings and tracks.

- Wild strawberries, edible, but about tiny in size.

- Very quiet, except for the sound of streams from all the snow run off. Even in July, found patches of snow. Ski slope are difficult to hike without trails, they are steep and can be rugged. It's interesting to see where rock has been dynamited to create a run. There is plenty of staff activity to maintain the terrain. Hay bails and netting to prevent erosion. All in all the landscape is kept clean and provides summer meadows for elk calving.
post #2 of 20
I remember either Ski or Skiing magazine once published a list of the stuff that some Colorado resort found after the snow melted. The most memorable thing on the list was a prosthetic leg. You would think the owner would want that back!
post #3 of 20
I hiked under three different chairlifts at Mammoth one day in July just after we had closed and this is what I found:

- $16 (3 $5's and a $1) *BEER MONEY!!!*

- A Sony mini-disc player with a disc in it (which after new batteries still worked)

- One ski, 177 K2 public enemy

- A nike mp3 player (which after new batteries still worked as well)

-A mini Gerber knife (very useful)

-disposable camera

- hats, gloves, etc...

- more trail maps than you can shake a stick at

- cell phone (old nokia)

- lots and lots of trash

It's actually a good thing to do. Bring a backpack, go hike your trails, and help pick up all the waste. It's a cool way to get a different look at your hill and it feels good, except for the whole out of breath thing.
post #4 of 20
Coincidentally, I've lost lots of those things.
post #5 of 20
Develop the pictures and post them here.
post #6 of 20
I have found a lot of stuff under the lifts both in season and off season. My biggest find wasa money clip with about $200 folded up all nice and neat. I also found ,sunglasses two way radio, a wallet with ID and once while hiking in back of Park City Mountain Resort another hiker found one brand new ski just one. My guess is that someone lost it in the powder and couldn't find it in the deep snow. There is a lot of treasure and even more trash to be found o those mountains
post #7 of 20
I was really hoping to find that student I lost during the season, but someone else must have gotten there first.
post #8 of 20
The last time I sloped-combed I was walking down from Loges Peak and I mainly found these funny aluminum rings, about 4.5" in diameter, with these black rubber three and four-spoked webs across the middle and a 3/8" hole in the center.
post #9 of 20
I found an Ipod below the Floral cliffs at snowbird this year, it worked I sent ti back to the owners in georgia. I found their address in the Ipod.
post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA
I found an Ipod below the Floral cliffs at snowbird this year, it worked I sent ti back to the owners in georgia. I found their address in the Ipod.
I bet they were suprised to see that again . They are so small . My son brought his and I cringed at the thought of him losing it. Plus they are white and impossible to find if you dropped it.
post #11 of 20
Always fun to troll the lift lines in warmer weather - especially before the brush grows high. Same old junk most of the time - elastic hair thingies, pocket change, keys, chapstick, gloves, poles, hats, etc., lost passes, a couple of silver rings, a couple of driver's licenses, trash/bottles/cans out the wazoo (really peeves me off).

Best trail finds to date are a couple of stainless ribbon bits. One last year and one the year before. At nearly a couple hundred bucks each I should start ransoming them off. Not sure if they belonged to race ops or patrol, so I turned one into each department.
post #12 of 20
One of my sons friends was hiking for some turns late season at Whistler. He found the wallet that he had lost two years before, everything intact.
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by medmarkco
Best trail finds to date are a couple of stainless ribbon bits. One last year and one the year before. At nearly a couple hundred bucks each I should start ransoming them off. Not sure if they belonged to race ops or patrol, so I turned one into each department.
Are you referring to auger/drill bits for setting gates and bamboo? If not, I don't know what "stainless ribbon bits" are.
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki
One of my sons friends was hiking for some turns late season at Whistler. He found the wallet that he had lost two years before, everything intact.
Wow! That's like winning the lotto, only a lot less profitable. Great find!

I lost a yellow lorus analog watch at Whistler about 6 years ago. Did he find that?
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH
Are you referring to auger/drill bits for setting gates and bamboo? If not, I don't know what "stainless ribbon bits" are.
Yes exactly, the ribbons are a little different design than the auger type, but same function.

post #16 of 20
This thread reminded me that I had forgotten to throw out a thank you to the person who found my digital camera at Jackson Hole this past January. I know the person who found it will probably not read this, but for those who find valueable things on the slopes, it is most appreciated when returned. I wanted to send a thank you and reward, but the person who dropped it in the lost and found didn't leave any personal info.

The story: We had the best conditions of our lives that trip. Deep, deep pow. After snapping a few shots at the top of what I think was Paint Brush, I heard skiis scraping rock, then a yelp, and saw my friend drop from sight. He had slid down about a 6 foot long steep section of rock that was burried under the new snow. He was alright, but lost a ski in the pow. In my rush to help, I put the camera in my arm pocket, but neglected to zip it. I only took a few turns to get to him, but then found the camera gone. We didn't even bother to look for it on the steep pow covered slope, especially after seeing 3 people ski through where I just was. I was heartbroken. My wife had told me not to lose it. Oops.

Filled out a report, and got a call back only a few days later that someone had found it. Unbelievable. It still worked fine.

btw, I once lost a money clip with $215 folded up all nice and neat. Utah49, could you please send that back to me?
post #17 of 20
I've found pins that are sold by the Mountain, a small pocket knife and a couple of ski poles that were snapped by the Cats. When I'm at Stowe next week I will comb the trails. I find that some of the best places to look are under lifts thats service beginner terrain, maybe this is because they're too worried about getiing down the slopesto even realize they have dropped something.(?)
post #18 of 20
Here's my anecdote: 4 seasons ago at Purg, I dropped a glove when my student decided that was the perfect time to slide out of the beginner's chair. Caught the student, lost the glove - it was January at the time. Was taking the same student up the same chair in late March, found the glove.
post #19 of 20

Strangest find....

When I was younger, my brothers and I would hike the trails and under the lifts at our home area...

Sure, the was the standard collection of pole baskets, loose change at the tops of the beginner chairs and such.

But the most astounding thing I ever found was a complete set of dentures! Poor guy must have spit them out as he fell getting off the lift....

I can imagine him reporting it to lost and found... "I ost y eeth"
post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruxpercnd View Post
I like to hike the slopes of Crystal Mt., Washington. It's fascinating to see what the terrain looks like without the snow. Streams flowing, lakes exposed, grassy meadows, etc. And I always keep a lookout for dropped items. Here is a short list:

I figure other folks must get up there to find the good stuff. And area staff probably pick up the poles and mittens from under the lifts.
-

Well if you find a wedding ring with 4-22-95 inscribed on the inside let me know. It's up there some where.
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