New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

the infamous "groin pull"

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
I have been battling a pulled groin now for about 3 years. Its always sore and once I start training, it gets painful to the point that I can't run at all. I have been stretching carefully but I was wondering if there is more that can be done. Any ideas? (other than go to the dr?)
post #2 of 17
I had the same problem when I did much running. Switched to riding a bike for exercise, and I have not had a groin problem since. Except when I ran up the stairs about 5 days ago. But I was still able to ride my bike, and today it feels fine.
post #3 of 17
Have you considered massage therapy? I had a groin pull this past winter and went to a massage therapist for a hot stone massage. It hurt for about a day after that, but then -- gone. All I know is it worked for me.

Make sure the therapist you see is nationally certified. That way you can be sure they know what they're doing.
post #4 of 17
Massage therapy for the groin area? Isn't that expensive? Or can you get one without the happy ending?

Seriously, try seeing a sports injury chiropractor. I had a shoulder pain from baseball that was unimproved after six months. The doc had me 100% within a few weeks! I highly recommend them.
post #5 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowSnake
Massage therapy for the groin area? Isn't that expensive? Or can you get one without the happy ending?

Seriously, try seeing a sports injury chiropractor. I had a shoulder pain from baseball that was unimproved after six months. The doc had me 100% within a few weeks! I highly recommend them.
I know you didn't mean it that way, but as a massage therapist myself, I find the reference to "happy endings" highly offensive. Certified Massage Therapists are not prosititutes -- we are skilled professionals who work to help clients manage muscle pain through the manipulation of fascia and muscle tissue. A groin injury, such as mine, was caused by a strain to the adductors, which are located on the upper inner thigh. No professional massage therapist will manipulate or contact the "private" area of your body. If they do, you have every right to call the police and charge them with assault.

Beyond that, massage therapists often work closely with chiropractors, so your suggestion to consult a sports injury chiropractor is a good one.
post #6 of 17
Why are happy endings limited to massages anyway? I think I speak for most guys when I say that a root canal would be much less painful if followed by a happy ending.
post #7 of 17
Seems like a long time. See an Orthosist or Pedorthis and have them check for a limb length or functional discrepancy. You might also want to review your stretching regimen. A good combination might be Massage therapy and stretching.
post #8 of 17
Have you taken off significant time at any point to let it heal?

By the way, I recommend don't stretch at all. You're probably just continuing to damage the tissue.
post #9 of 17
Hey Finndog,

I suspected you probably had back problems, too, and did a search and saw you had back surgery. I think your groin problem may be related to your back.

I hope, by the way, that your back surgery was a success. I had chronic back problems and, fortunately, discovered John Sarno's book, Healing Back Pain: The Mind-Body Connection. His belief is that herniated disks are harmless and that many people have them and have no pain. May sound crazy when you first hear it, but the book worked miracles for me. If you still have any kind of back pain, I HIGHLY recommend it. It changed my life.

In my opinion, assuming excessive stretching isn't the culprit for your long-term groin pain and that you have at some point rested it for a significant period of time, I strongly suspect there is a mind-body connection to your groin pain and that it may be directly connected to your back. I'll break down my thinking into two parts:

1. Sarno's follow-up book, The Mind-Body Prescription, applies the same theories that relate to back pain to ailments in other parts of the body. When I have any kind of injury that I have given a reasonable amount of time to heal and it hasn't, I refer to the tenets expressed in his book and then I begin my normal exercise routine and work through the pain (which he recommends). This has worked for many lower-leg "injuries" with the exception of my plantar fasciitis last year (which I was too fearful to trust would go away if I continued to run on it, but I suspect it probably would...acupuncture ended up working).

2. Oftentimes, when I get pain in my knee area or groin, I can, by pressure with my fingers, locate the nerve that's triggering the pain sensation. I then find that I can usually trace the nerve upward to some extent and find that there is pain at various points along the nerve. Therefore, my opinion is that the pain is really being triggered at the root of the nerve in the lower back and not in the groin or knee. I don't really know what sciatica is, but this might be similar to that. I then conclude that, though there is pain in the nerve, there is nothing seriously wrong with me (in accordance with Sarno's theories). There is more to it, that you'd have to read the book to find out, about addressing mentally why your body is reacting to psychological issues with physical pain. Keep in mind, the pain is real, the nerves are being irritated, your disk in your back may be herniated, but none of this should deter you from physical activity. You can make the pain disappear and you can have a completely normal athletic life with herniated disks.

You may find this stuff too far out there, but I urge you to look into it and give it a try, since your ailments very much seem to mirror my own.

--Adam
post #10 of 17
I agree that aggressive stretching can be more damaging. It is more likely strengthening is needed. But depending on the state of the injury you might need PT.

Massage is definitely good for a lot of stuff. My sister in law is certified it does make a difference IMO knowing the anatomy and such, musclature and connective tissues.

Yeah massage therapists don't really like the whole massage parlor jokes too much. Be respectful to them because they can cure your aches and pains and speed recovery time.
post #11 of 17
"When I have any kind of injury that I have given a reasonable amount of time to heal and it hasn't, I refer to the tenets expressed in his book and then I begin my normal exercise routine and work through the pain (which he recommends)."

Jeez---when I have any kind of injury that isn't healing, I usually go to the Doctor!:
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by doogiedoc

Jeez---when I have any kind of injury that isn't healing, I usually go to the Doctor!:
Trust me, I've gone that route. Spent plenty of money on co-pay, chiropractor visits, physical therapy, massage therapy, orthotics, etc. But for chronic pain, I believe that Western medicine is wholly inadequate. Look, it works for me, and you can check the reviews of Sarno's books on Amazon to see that it works for a lot of other folks, too.

EDIT: This advice is not for everyone, across the board. I recognized that Finndog had similar long-term issues like I had. A strained groin should heal in a few weeks. He needs to think outside the box. That's what I did after giving up all sports for a number of years due to back problems. And I am very fortunate to have found Dr. Sarno's books.

EDIT#2: Also, I'm not advising exercising through all injuries. Right now, for instance, I have either a bruised bone or stress fracture in my foot from amping up my running miles way too fast. I'm not going to just start running on it if the pain hasn't gone away in a few weeks. If, however, I had tendinitis in my knee and had rested it for a few weeks and it hadn't improved, I would change course in my treatment of that injury; I would start looking at psychological causes for the inflammation and I would start running through it, confident in my belief that there was not anything seriously structurally wrong with me. Once again, this type of treatment is only for people who tend to get long-term injuries that should have healed long ago but didn't.
post #13 of 17
Find an experienced physiotherapist.
post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks to all.
1st- my back is completely healed (although i don't push it) AND by the way, a ruptured disk where the anulus (sp) is oozing out and impinging a nerve is not in your head, trust me! Its a pain like yo neve expericenced.

2nd- I will go to a dr. i was just ot sure of who to go to. I spoke to a dr. last year and all he wanted to do is put me on advil and to a physical therapist.

3rd- Thanks! I need to do something - I just hope there is a happy ending! ")- just joking! Is there a specific kind of message therapist that I should look for? My concern is finding someone with sports training who understands the issue and not giving me a message like an old lady who was tired after a day of shopping
post #15 of 17
I think many have had the frustrating experience of being told "if it hurts don't do that" by some primary care physician when faced with a sports-related injury. No I want to be ABLE to enjoy the activity. It's especially true in the age of HMOs and insurance industry ripoffs.

It took a while but I found a sports medicine clinic who deal with this type of thing - I would try and look for a place that deals with this type of stuff on a regular basis. I don't have a specific reference because this was a local hospital that works with professional athletes and the like. Supplant what they find with massage and PT. All else fails go to Snowbird and order up a fitness retreat and some spa treatments .
post #16 of 17
Finndog,

I'm glad your surgery was a success. For many people it's not. I personally refused to go the surgery route despite pain that was likely equal to yours. I've just never had faith in Western medicine for all but the most acute of ailments. Yes, fluid leaking from a disk sounds acute, but it is actually common. I live with it...and I do push it (hence my username).

Anyway, I'm not into prosletyzing. I always just present what worked for me, and if it doesn't strike a chord with someone, I let it go. However, I do want to clarify that I never said anything about an impinged nerve being in your head. Of course, the ruptured disk is real and the impinged nerve is real. And maybe you did have an unusual instance that truly required surgery. But, for me, all symptoms were resolved after reading the book. No more lying on the floor all day, unable to get up because the slightest movement would cause unbearable pain. Regardless of the form of treatment -- surgical or otherwise -- I'm sure we're both grateful that those days are behind us.
post #17 of 17
Thread Starter 
Mogul junkie, I am laughing my but off right now. If your pain is any where even remotely close, you couldn't stand let alone ski. When your sciatic nerve is being impinged even oxyconton didn't kill the pain. You can barely move your leg, you swear your leg is on fire and God help you if you sneeze or cough the pain is excruciating. Want to hear about the joys of going to the bathroom? Sounds like you have a bulged disk, that's very common and non-threatening. FYI- the most effective treatment for me was accupuncture but even he suggested surgery. Same day, in and out, a half inch incision. I was jogging on trails two weeks later! FYI- this method of surgery is highly successful.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav: