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Looking for best all mountain ski - Page 2

post #31 of 45
I second the Dynastar 8000, probably 178- try 'em. If you are skiing less than a couple weeks a year, you'll want a good all arounder that's easy to ski. The 8's are amazingly forgiving and mellow for an upper level ski and ski most things well from ice to bumps- They make a great powder ski- I like 'em as much as my 8800's 1n a foot or less. I have a quiver with Volkls 5* (for "frozen granular") and fatter skis for deep Utah stuff but I use the 8's as my everyday ski. Least last year I did. This year, new stuff, so we'll see...
post #32 of 45
Until you start skiing more than 10 days a year, don't buy skis, just demo unless you get a great deal on a used pair of something recommended. It's like having a huge quiver at a bargain price. If you haven't been to a bootfitter in the last 10 years, use the money on that instead.
post #33 of 45
are there any skis out there which are totally over-rated? i know everyone will have their individual favorites, but are there any all mountain skis universally crucified?
post #34 of 45

K-2 Skis are made in China

Just a reminder. There are MANY good skis out there.
post #35 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by skievo View Post
are there any skis out there which are totally over-rated?
That depends entirely on whose opinion you're receiving.

Quote:
Originally Posted by skievo View Post
i know everyone will have their individual favorites, but are there any all mountain skis universally crucified?
Yes. Any "all-mountain" ski with a waist width of less than 90mm.

I'm reminded constantly that I'm out of my mind for preferring a 66mm-waisted ski for any conditions less than two feet of powder and crud.

In all seriousness, though, every all-mountain ski you could name has its enthusiastic fans here in Jackson Hole. As was said earlier in this thread, there are so many great skis around it just boggles the mind.
post #36 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
I'm reminded constantly that I'm out of my mind for preferring a 66mm-waisted ski for any conditions less than two feet of powder and crud.

Let me remind you that you are out of your mind.

You do have to realize though that you have the skill and have put the time in to use those 66mm skis all-mountain. Some of us need the crutch of the fat skis (not kidding).
post #37 of 45
Bob, are you serious? 66 waist is your ski at Jackson Hole?
post #38 of 45
I've got a 66 waist ski -- my 200cm Kastle CarveMachine GSes. I skied them one day last year, in late February, when Tahoe's season looked like it was coming to an early end and off-piste meant on-rocks.

Then, on February 27, the snows hit.

The remaining 18 or 20 days of the season -- including July 4th weekend at Mammoth -- I was on my 99-waist Bros.
post #39 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post
Bob, are you serious? 66 waist is your ski at Jackson Hole?
Hey, Paul.

Yes, I am serious, but I'm also an extreme anomaly (throwback?).

You'll note that I *did* qualify that by saying it's my preferred ski for less than two feet of new snow or crud. If there's a lot of new snow, particularly if it's wind-hit (which it often is at JH), then my "big" ski is an 88mm waist.

My favorite everyday ski for the last three winters has been the Head I.C, 200 in a 177cm (the longest they make in that model). I'm replacing them this winter with the i.Supershape, which is essentially the current version of the same ski. It just gives me everything I need - and want - to ski all over this mountain and it's backcountry - most of the time.

It might help to consider three things:

First, I like to turn. I don't mind going fast from time to time, but I really like the sensation of loading up a ski and feeling it come around. I've never yet found a fat, all-mountain ski that truly gives me that same feeling.

Second, I really like skiing funky places. I prefer picking my way through rocks and pillows and trees and connect-the-dot chutes instead of straightlining some open bowl or face. That's just personal preference, but I don't need a big fat ski to do the kind of skiing I like.

Lastly, I learned to ski a long time ago. Not that I'm not still learning, but powder and crud skiing comes pretty easy to me after all these years and all those miles. Back in the 80's, I was skiing every condition at Jackson Hole with a "quiver" of two pairs of skis; one pair was a "new" pair of 204cm K2 712's and the other was a beat-up pair of 204cm K2 712's.

I used the beat-up ones for powder/crud skiing and the new ones for hardpack days/races. (The wild thing is that back then *I* was the cheater - most of my friends used 210cm GS skis for all those funky conditions.)

Now, compared to a 204cm straight ski, a 177cm modern ski with approximate dimensions of 120-66-105 and a turn radius of around 13m is like a dream come true. They give WAY more float and crud capability than what I learned on and I just don't feel the need for anything wider *MOST* of the time. It's all personal preference, of course.

ZZZ, thank you for reminding me. Without that daily reminder I get this vague feeling that something is missing from my life.

As if YOU need any kind of crutch of any sort!

I will say that if I were a full-time patroller at a big Western ski resort, I would definitely put the 66's in the back of the closet. You guys have to contend with all kinds of crappy snow and keep victims on a sled safe at the same time. If that was my gig, I'd be on bigger skis.
post #40 of 45
Easyrider,
I'm 5'11" 175lbs, & ski the Recon in 181.
I like it alot, but as others have said, Demo.
I've also tried the Legend 8000, which is considered an all-mountain ski, but skis very different than the Recon.

Just my .02
post #41 of 45
My 67-68? mm Kastles work fine in all conditions.... so long as I don't let my speed drop below about 40 mph.

PS. They tend to bog down in deep powder unless it's really steep, I weight 165 and they're 208cm long.

An all-mountain ski is like an all-season tire: good enough most of the time, but can't hold a candle to the right tool for the job.
post #42 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eazyrider View Post
I've been trying to find out what the best all mountain ski is going to be for me. I ski mostly black runs, and mostly off piste. I've been skiing K2 threes for nearly a decade and now I'm definitley looking for something with a little mroe float (current skis are a pain to ski in powder) but I don't want to sacrifice versatility. I am very biased in favor of K2 and have been looking extensively at the Apache Outlaw and Recon. I was almost sold on the Outlaw until a friend talked me out of it, saying that it wasn't versatile enough, and was more of a quiver ski for powder days. I am currently VERY strongly considering the Recon, but have not ruled out the Rossi Bandit series, or other makes. Any opinions? I need to be certain before buying, as this pair of skis will probably carry me another decade. Thanks,

Adam
I'd say, the '01 or '02 Volant Chubb (the stiffest Chubbs ever made). They handle everything well with the exception of really icy conditions. They are ultra damp, float great, you can charge the crud with precious little deflection, blast through windslab, ski moguls, and are smooth and stable in a high speed runnout. Chubbs RULE!! :
post #43 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
I'm replacing them this winter with the i.Supershape, which is essentially the current version of the same ski. It just gives me everything I need - and want - to ski all over this mountain and it's backcountry - most of the time.
Bob, I've skied an SL9 all-mountain and will probably be replacing it this year with the SuperShape as well. I actually enjoy the sensation of riding down in the snow when its only one to two feet as opposed to surfing the top.

I've got the Monster 88 for skiing deeper snow and bigger lines in bowls. I'm a lighter skier so the 88 seems to provide enough float to get me up to the top. I'd have to ask physics man if that's actually true .

For me, I prefer the edge to edge quickness and the fact that they are responsive at a wider range of speeds over the added float and stability in most conditions. I suspect that if I spent the majority of my time charging big arcs in the back country I'd probably have the opposite point of view.
post #44 of 45
I second,third or fourth ( what ever it's up to ) the Supershape as an all around ski in almost all below knee deep conditions. Another ski to watch in the upcoming reviews and to demo is the new Dynastar Contact 11 for 06-07. This ski does not ski French but more of an Austrian feel with suprisingly no metal in the laminates. It is a bit wider than the Supershape at 70 or 72 ( I forgot ). If you get a chance early season to demo give it a ride.
post #45 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by onyxjl View Post

I actually enjoy the sensation of riding down in the snow when its only one to two feet as opposed to surfing the top.
Me too. I grew up on those long skinny skis so my 724 pro's are like cheating to me. Less side cut so they need to be worked. But they reward nicely.

I've got a new pair of Top Fuel (Nordica) which seem to have some side cut. We'll see. They'll be in East coast powder if I'm lucky. Need to be able to hold on ice (underneath)
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