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Women Specific Skis... and??

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by treckchick
I'm opening myself up to a flaming but........
I think a woman who has a quiver is a woman who is an aggressive skier. Up until recently the women specific skis tended to be softer and more forgiving, and thus not an adequate ski for an aggressive female skier.

I think the market for the women specific skis is changing to cover the woman who wants a more substantial ski, and that is a good thing. Where as, in the past their primary target was the woman who was a bit more of a casual skier. Someone who's husband bought her skis to try and encourage her to ski with the family.

In my house, we have 14 sets of skis. My husband skis on mine once in a while, and I ski on some of his once in a while. IF I were to get something like say.....the Phat Luvs, not so much of a versitile family ski huh?
And as for resale, you get a woman ski, you will only be able to sell it to another woman.
My entire quiver could be sold to a woman or a man. Better resale value!

Is the industry wasting their time? I don't think so, but I do think they need to make it more obvious that I need to give a woman specific ski another try. Now that you mention it, maybe I will demo a few.
Trekchick posted this today in the women's ski quivers thread and it caught my attention - especially that few of the women were skiing on women's skis. Id on't attribute this to our women 'out skiing' women specific models because in most cases in recent times the women's skis hold their own witht he uni-sex models just fine. Trecchick hit on A LOT of great points regarding female specific models that (being a guy) I would have never thought of. Resale and trade-ability are two huge points that would never occur to me until a girl wanted to try a pair of my skis.

While I was thinking about this it occurred to me that there are women specific skis/brands out there that might not be labeled as such. What comes to mind is the following: Look at how many women are skiing on Volkl, Elan, Dynastar, Rossignol, and Salomon race skis. In women's lengths, those skis in my opinion are "women's skis." Also, those same companies, with the execption of Volkl's retail skis, are known to build skis that flex on the softer end of the spectrum, and usually have a more forward mounting point (female friendly) than the Atomics, Nordicas, Fischers, and Blizzards out there (Although we should give Atomic props for the entire women specific race line).

So, is it logical to assume that women will ski on the brand of skis that suits them best regardless of whether it is a women specific model or not? A woman might choose to ski on a 155cm Volkl Race Tiger because they are known for their softer flex and supple nature while still providing high end performance? It would also seem logical - based on trekchicks observations - that when shopping a woman should find the brand that suits her the best (as most men do once they are familiar with a brand) and then choose the model that she prefers - irregardless of whether it is a women specific model or not. It is like that a uni-sex ski with "female ski qualities" will be just as good or better than an equivalent women's model ski from a manufacturer that might not be such a great fit to a woman's skiing style and body build.

Ladies... Thought?

Later

GREG
post #2 of 26
My wife reports that she prefers slightly shorter unisex skis forward mounted over appropriate length women's models. She's 5'8", though, Volkl fan, thus 5* over Attiva 5. Can't speak for K2's, other popular female-specific brands. Suspect size/muscularity is part of the answer.
post #3 of 26
My wife likes having more to choose from :
post #4 of 26
My wife....now prefers a womans ski. Lola has been skiing 20ish years, here is the skis that she has had.

160 Dynastar package ski (stolen Christmas night of the day I gave them to her)
175 Pre Electra 2000
180 Pre M4
193 Rossi 7Sk
188 Dynastar X8
173 Volant PowerKarve L
160 Volant Vertex 68
156 Volkl AC2L

Of late, she prefers a womans ski, are they better? In her mind, they are better for her, so YES they are better. For the past 4 or so ski choices, she wouldn't consider a unisex ski and just wanted to look at womans skis, that was fine with me.
post #5 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond
My wife reports that she prefers slightly shorter unisex skis forward mounted over appropriate length women's models. She's 5'8", though, Volkl fan, thus 5* over Attiva 5. Can't speak for K2's, other popular female-specific brands. Suspect size/muscularity is part of the answer.
I had the Volkl 5* and really enjoyed it.
the performance was great, and the flex was ideal.
I felt like I "outskied" the women specific version of that ski.


Its been a while since I've really given women specific skis a shot.
I'd like to demo some and do some reviews this winter.
post #6 of 26
I demoed women specific skis each time i've bought new skis but never bought one. I just didn't like them but doubt it's because i "outskied" them. I think it has more to do with the forward mount. It's not how i learned and i don't like how it skis. You may have something regarding brand, regardless of gender. I have always ended up with Atomics or (once) Dynastar. My husband always is either Volkl or Salomon. Go figure.
post #7 of 26
I once read an article that said according to market studies 70% of women buy skis based on color. Apparently you ladies are in the other 30%.
post #8 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot
I once read an article that said according to market studies 70% of women buy skis based on color. Apparently you ladies are in the other 30%.
Well I have two sisters. Judging on the history of the three of us...........
I would say I am in the 1/3 that doesn't pick according to color
post #9 of 26
heluva... don't know how it works for your theory... but I love Stocklis, liked my old volkls and my dynamics... and enjoy the K2 lotta luvs....

I have never found a salomon ski that I enjoyed to ski on.... and rossis don't seem to be my thing...

I did enjoy the dynastars i skied in Argentiere...
post #10 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick
Well I have two sisters. Judging on the history of the three of us...........
I would say I am in the 1/3 that doesn't pick according to color
I would guess you are the smartest also.
post #11 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ
I would guess you are the smartest also.
Awe, nice of you to say, but no.:
post #12 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick
Awe, nice of you to say, but no.:
Ok . then . The wisest purchaser of skis.
post #13 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by disski
heluva... don't know how it works for your theory... but I love Stocklis, liked my old volkls and my dynamics... and enjoy the K2 lotta luvs....

I have never found a salomon ski that I enjoyed to ski on.... and rossis don't seem to be my thing...

I did enjoy the dynastars i skied in Argentiere...
Not surprisingly - it fits well into my thoughts on this... actually it fits perfectly. Look at how far forward your Stocklis are mounted in comparison to other skis (Nordica, Blizzard, Atomic, - even Fischer, although they use a forward mount as well... etc). Salomons mount in a similar position, but are far less 'ski' in terms of performance hen compared head to head with a race-bred Stockli. Due to the race construction and female friendly mounting point you have found a ski that suits your preferred skiing.

Now, when I mention the mounting point it is impotant to point out that you can't go and change any ski you like to have a forward mounting point... because the 'sweet spot' of the ski will then end up BEHIND you, which forces the skier into the backseat... a most unfortuante thing.

disski, I suspect you would also find Elan race skis to be of the same ature that you are accustomed to. Having not skied the Stockli it is hard to guage, but they do have many similar qualities. Ironically, the nature of the Elan skis is what first drew me to them... and also what brought me t leave them behind for Nordica.

[Race stock from Salomon, Rossignol, Dynastar, Volkl, and K2 may also be of interest... ]

Later

GREG
post #14 of 26
Find me a similar ski to the sugar daddy for as low a price for women and I would buy it for my daughter. Its that simple.....
post #15 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfonse
Find me a similar ski to the sugar daddy for as low a price for women and I would buy it for my daughter. Its that simple.....
A unisex ski under 165, tends to fall through the cracks and thats where deals are to be had, especially when you get into the 150's. The higher performance, the better the value.

Us "average sized" guys tend not to get those types of deals.
post #16 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ
Ok . then . The wisest purchaser of skis.
That would be true. I even helped both of my sisters pick out their skis. Big sister is still fine with hers. Little sister is ready to kick it up a notch. Good news! I get to buy skis with someone else's money
post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfonse
Find me a similar ski to the sugar daddy for as low a price for women and I would buy it for my daughter. Its that simple.....
You got that right! That's where I find my deals, and great quality equipment.
post #18 of 26
I think a lot of alpine skiers, and particularly womem who may be ligther or less agressive, overlook a large potential source of great skis, and that's tele skis. Most major companies have tele models that are viturally identical to the alpine skis except that they will be slightly softer flex, and usually about $200 cheaper because the tele market will not bear the high prices that the alpine market will.

Case in point: Some of you have been talking about the Sugar Daddy. You can buy the Atomic Tele Daddy in a 165 right now at Sierra Trading Post for $199, and they have had them available there for months. It is 99mm waisted and is the identical demension and I believe almost the identical construction as the Sugare Daddy except slightly softer, which is perfect for an intermediate or lighter powder skier.

I know several ladies who have a tele ski mounted alpine in their quiver, my wife included. She converted her Rossi T3s to alpine and loves them as an all-mountain ski. Great on the hardpack, bumps and until it gets so deep she goes to a fatty. They are identical to the alpine B2 except the layer of metal is slightly thinner, but they are not as soft as the women specific B2W.

A good ski is a good ski, so anyone looking for a "women specific" or slightly softer model of an alpine ski should check out the huge selection of "tele" skis. A little homework can save you some money and maybe get you just the ski you were looking for.
post #19 of 26
I skied with K2 sponsered athlete, Kim Riechelm, several times last year. Not once was she on the Luvs.
post #20 of 26

Correction!

Actually, Sierra Trading Post has Tele Daddies in 153s and 163s for $199.
post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD
I skied with K2 sponsered athlete, Kim Riechelm, several times last year. Not once was she on the Luvs.
What skis did she ski?
Enquiring Epic Women wanna know!:
post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier
Now, when I mention the mounting point it is impotant to point out that you can't go and change any ski you like to have a forward mounting point... because the 'sweet spot' of the ski will then end up BEHIND you, which forces the skier into the backseat... a most unfortuante thing.

disski, I suspect you would also find Elan race skis to be of the same ature that you are accustomed to. Having not skied the Stockli it is hard to guage, but they do have many similar qualities. Ironically, the nature of the Elan skis is what first drew me to them... and also what brought me t leave them behind for Nordica.

[Race stock from Salomon, Rossignol, Dynastar, Volkl, and K2 may also be of interest... ]

Later

GREG
Have to disagree with this generalization. Quite often the "sweet spot" is forwards, so the forward mount will put it underfoot. eg. Dynastar 63 course was like that.

In my non-scientific comparison of skis, I've found that intermediate and beginner skis favour the forward mount, while more advanced skis favour a more aft mount position.

Here's what I suspect:

The aft mount position demands that the skier be more active in moving forwards to engage the shovels/initiate the turn. That's fine, since lateral and forwards movements are not a problem for the advanced skier.

When the skier moves back to "center", that will actually put the skier slightly aft, so that that the pressure will move towards the tail, unloading the shovels and straightening the turn, like at completion/release. This position clearly favours completion of the turn. It does not require the skier to move well into the back seat to acheive either. (Aside: I wonder how far back the mount point is for WC skiers like Bode.)

This aft move is harder to do from the forward mount point -- you just have to move back way too far. The forward mount clearly favours turn initiation -- and that is exactly what the recreational skier is looking for. Initiation by lateral movement, and engagement of the shovels is easy, since your already near them...

At least that's what I've noticed. And it makes sense with Keelty's observations, that the "average Joe" preferred the more forward mount -- the "average Joe" does not move as much as needed to ski the higher end ski.

Anyway, that's my 2 cents.
post #23 of 26
Ladies ... any feedback on Volkl Queen Attiva skis? I'm interested as I might grab a set for my daughter. She's 6'-0" ~165lbs and a strong skier. Our last couple of trips out west, she's complained a bit when she gets in powder. Her current skiis are fine for east coast firm and ice, but too narrow waisted for the pow. Any experience on the Volkls or recommendations on other powder skis is appreciated.
post #24 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dorm57
Ladies ... any feedback on Volkl Queen Attiva skis? I'm interested as I might grab a set for my daughter. She's 6'-0" ~165lbs and a strong skier. Our last couple of trips out west, she's complained a bit when she gets in powder. Her current skiis are fine for east coast firm and ice, but too narrow waisted for the pow. Any experience on the Volkls or recommendations on other powder skis is appreciated.
The Queen Attiva is just a softened Volkl Karma (same exact shape and pretty much the same construction except the core of the Karma is supposedly stiffer somehow).

The queen attiva is also a non-twin tip so it's lengths come 5cm less (172 Queen Attiva = 177 Karma).

Given your daughters size and ski ability I would lean her toward the stiffer Karma. That would make a fine ski for the purposes you mention.

I should also mention that the Queen Attiva is IDENTICAL to Volkls tele ski the T-Rock - if you go that route shop for both to increase your chances at finding a good deal.
post #25 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick
I had the Volkl 5* and really enjoyed it.
the performance was great, and the flex was ideal.
I felt like I "outskied" the women specific version of that ski.
Just curious.

Which binding did you have on the 5 star, the LT or AT w/ piston?
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by troutman
Just curious.

Which binding did you have on the 5 star, the LT or AT w/ piston?
I had the Motion AT
I the friend who bought them from me is thrilled with them.
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