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Anyone into rock climbing?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Over the past few weeks I've gotten heavily into rock climbing at my local gym. I've gotten up a 5.8+ without cheating, but lately I spend more time traversing and bouldering to try to increase my hand strength. The jump from 5.8 to 5.9 is too much for me at the moment, but I'm hoping to get there before I head off to school. I get better every time I go, so we'll see.

I was wondering if we have any Bears who are closet climbers...
post #2 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by doublediamond223
Over the past few weeks I've gotten heavily into rock climbing at my local gym. I've gotten up a 5.8+ without cheating, but lately I spend more time traversing and bouldering to try to increase my hand strength. The jump from 5.8 to 5.9 is too much for me at the moment, but I'm hoping to get there before I head off to school. I get better every time I go, so we'll see.

I was wondering if we have any Bears who are closet climbers...
other than skiing and mtn biking, climbing is one of my passions.

5.8 - 5.9 climbing is great if you are just starting out. keep on doing routes in the gym, and just keep at it. you'll be surprised at the jumps you can make in ability and the grade that you can climb. when i was at college i got myself up to 5.12c - i was real psyched when i was climbing like that. i really got into bouldering - that is good fun. really inexpensive, and you get really strong.

but now that i am out of school, and i dont have enough time to do it, i can only get the 5.10d's... and those are on the 'good' days. but i still love it!
post #3 of 18
10d lead?

Haven't been since the 3rd RC repair.

If you swim the catch improves by orders of magnitude AND you get a long body line.
post #4 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by doublediamond223
Over the past few weeks I've gotten heavily into rock climbing at my local gym. I've gotten up a 5.8+ without cheating,
I was wondering if we have any Bears who are closet climbers...
Great start! Now get out of that gym and the fun begins.

I have a hard time putting form, time, and partners together these days, but rock climbing is the best mental break I know of. A single multi pitch route is like a week's vacation.
post #5 of 18
get a rope (or better yet, a climbing partner with a rope), and start the single pitch climbs on tope rope, then begin leading.

I'm pretty old-school, if you're not leading at a certain level, then you're not climbing at the level.
post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by clarkenstein
other than skiing and mtn biking, climbing is one of my passions.

5.8 - 5.9 climbing is great if you are just starting out. keep on doing routes in the gym, and just keep at it. you'll be surprised at the jumps you can make in ability and the grade that you can climb. when i was at college i got myself up to 5.12c - i was real psyched when i was climbing like that. i really got into bouldering - that is good fun. really inexpensive, and you get really strong.

but now that i am out of school, and i dont have enough time to do it, i can only get the 5.10d's... and those are on the 'good' days. but i still love it!
I feel like I get better every time I go, which is pretty much every day right now. I get the best workout and feel like I increase my skill level by traversing as much as I climb, if not more.

I watched some med students lead climb a 5.12 last night, it was pretty unbelievable. I watched one of the people from the same group toprope a 5.10d, that looked pretty damned hard to me. I wouldn't sell yourself short...... 5.12s look impossible to me at the moment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by icanseeformiles(andmiles)
get a rope (or better yet, a climbing partner with a rope), and start the single pitch climbs on tope rope, then begin leading.

I'm pretty old-school, if you're not leading at a certain level, then you're not climbing at the level.
I watched a lead class last night, but I don't know how to do it yet. The clipping looks like it takes some getting used to, but beyond that it looks like a blast. I watched someone fall right before they were going to clip into the next quickdraw, and since he was about 4 feet above the last one, he fell a good 8 feet. It looked painful, but w/e.

I eventually want to get outside, but 175+ for a rope is a little much right now, considering that my school has the largest free-standing climbing wall in the state.
post #7 of 18
Pulling plastic is fun and good exercise and great preparation for the real deal...

... but it ain't the real deal. Get thee outside!

I'm out for the season healing from a dislocated shoulder, which is a huge bummer because I just invested in a trad rack and was starting to learn how to lead trad. I'd been leading 5.10c sport routes, but trad is a whole different ball game and 5.7 is about what I was able to do before I got hurt (on my MTB, not climbing).

We have a great climbing gym at the local community college which is a killer way to build climbing-specific strength in the winter. Work on "follow the leader" and other climbing-gym games, and you'll be amazed at some of the stuff you can accomplish in a gym. You can also learn how to build anchors there - an irreplaceable skill for when you make the transition outside.

Here's another one - get yourself two tennis balls and climb with them in your hands. You'll learn a very, very important skill - how to place and stay balanced over your feet. Men naturally depend on upper body strength to climb, but the best climbers use balance and leg strength for their moves.

Keep your eye on REI - they regularly put climbing ropes on sale. I got mine, a 60m 10.5mm Mammut dry rope for $60.

Also - if you're serious about learning to climb, you should look into Red Rocks Rendezvous, an annual climbing festival held in Las Vegas in March. Mountain Gear puts it on... check their website. I've gone for two years now, and it's a killer environment for learning. It's also very cheap and there's plenty of good swag available.

Have fun!
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by mountaingirl1961
...
Here's another one - get yourself two tennis balls and climb with them in your hands. You'll learn a very, very important skill - how to place and stay balanced over your feet. Men naturally depend on upper body strength to climb, but the best climbers use balance and leg strength for their moves...
Good idea!

When I was teaching climbing way back in the late 70's, I would always take male students into some bouldering problems in which they want to use their arms. Wouldn't take too long before their arms were too tired to even move. Then, I'd start teaching them climbing.
post #9 of 18
Thread Starter 
Update: The wall where I go to school required some adjustments to my technique. It is full of pitch changes and protrusions, many of which require brute-force pull-ups. My gym at home was mostly straight pitches where the difficulty was determined by the size and location of the holds more than the pitches, and placed more emphasis on balance. I have finally learned to climb with my arms straight, saving a whole ton of energy, and have gotten into bouldering heavily, since this wall does not have enough surface area to traverse. I've done all the 5.8s and 5.8+'s, and I got my first 5.9 today. It was a blast, and started out on this inverted (overhang, more accurately) bouldering section then went up. It was a blast!

I've made friends with a guy down the hall who has a rope and all kinds of outdoor climbing gear, so I'm sure we'll make a trip at some point.

There are very few lead clips on this wall, so I'll probably have to wait to go back to my gym at home to really learn.
post #10 of 18
Sweet!

The gym near me has a superb arch and cave section, mostly bouldering as it's too exhausting to climb the belay rope on lead.

One funky thing though: I learned the hard way to be very, very careful on high steps and heel hooks after an intense ride or skate. Imagine a slab 5.10c with an extended left leg supporting a fingertip Gaston, and a very high high step to the right, mbe slightly higher than hip level. I got the toe on, engaged the foot to move, started pushing off with the left fingertip, and felt my upper quadricep lock up right at the hip. Like a goofball I pushed through it because,well, that is the climber mentality, and kapow!, I couldn't use that leg no more.

I asked to be lowered off and crawled off the mat, ate some Vitamin I and, long story short, spent the next 2 riding seasons not being able to push through the top of the stroke.
post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
So what was the injury? I've been heel-hooking a lot on the v1-v1+'s, so it's important to know, I guess. What is a gaston (I'm still a climbing jong I guess)?
post #12 of 18
Upper quadricep tear, right where it ties into the hip bone.

Heel hooks are mostly a hamstring thing, tho.

A gaston is where you really only have a vertical grip for either hand, and need to pull them apart with your chest to the wall to maintain grip.
post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by doublediamond223
There are very few lead clips on this wall, so I'll probably have to wait to go back to my gym at home to really learn.
And furthermore, I found out today that they won't even let you take the lead class unless you can climb a 5.10 without falling. WTF is that...
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by doublediamond223 View Post
And furthermore, I found out today that they won't even let you take the lead class unless you can climb a 5.10 without falling. WTF is that...
Reasonable, IMHO, though dependent on the routes they have set for lead. Don't forget, the first two clips are basically a bouldering problem, the sequencing is different than TR since you need to have a clip hand free to reach, there's more time spent on those holds until your clipping gets smooth, the belay is different, and you're pretty much hand-over-handing it up the rope if you fall off an arch or overhang. Will they let you follow & clean?

ps you're pulling V1-V2, those dynamic moves coming right along,eh?
post #15 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
Reasonable, IMHO, though dependent on the routes they have set for lead. Don't forget, the first two clips are basically a bouldering problem, the sequencing is different than TR since you need to have a clip hand free to reach, there's more time spent on those holds until your clipping gets smooth, the belay is different, and you're pretty much hand-over-handing it up the rope if you fall off an arch or overhang. Will they let you follow & clean?

ps you're pulling V1-V2, those dynamic moves coming right along,eh?
I don't know what follow and clean means.

I've pulled all but one of the 5 v1s that are up right now. I got a v2 2 days ago, but I think it was overrated. It was a long traverse with some difficult arm-only sections, but I'm used to traversing at my home gym, so it wasn't a problem. V1+, IMO.

Also, I've been reading the climbing mags, and I was wondering what "flash," "redpoint," and a few other terminology items mean.
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by doublediamond223 View Post
I don't know what follow and clean means.
The lead climber clips the rope through all the clips including the top, then, after he's lowered off, leaves the rope up and unties from the sharp end. You tie into the old belay end as a virtual top-rope. Then, as you reach each clip, you remove the rope from it. You leave the last set of clips at the top and are lowered off from those. Belay commands are 'Slack' and 'Take', and you will need a slacker rope to do this than ever one is used to on TR.

Quote:
Also, I've been reading the climbing mags, and I was wondering what "flash,"
Problem sent on first try without previous sequencing from the ground

Quote:
"redpoint,"
Work a route and the problems on it in sections over and over until the whole thing can be stitched together.
post #17 of 18
Thread Starter 
I've finally gotten outside, as you all have advised, see my TR:
http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=45886

I've done about 5 5.10s indoors now, so I'm eligible to take the lead class. I'm making very slow progress bouldering, but it will come. I'm still at v1-v2.
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by doublediamond223 View Post
I
Also, I've been reading the climbing mags, and I was wondering what "flash," "redpoint," and a few other terminology items mean.
From some guidebook:

definitions

Flash: The opposite of thrash
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