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Predictions about 2006-07 Buyer's Guides - Page 2

post #31 of 58
Excellent exotic ski site:
Ski Canada regularly tests or reviews Armada, 4FRNT, Kootenay, Prior, Goode, Line, Scott and Movement. This is mainly because they are available to Canadian consumers. Skis like Virus, Duel, Lacroix, Lightning, Bogner, Liberty, Nava, Blossom, Hart, AK etc. have been reviewed in previous issues but getting test models is not easy. Getting a reply to email is not easy from some of these brands. But it's a good point and we keep trying.
To add to your listing it may be worth noting that Virus skis use Teflon as a base material on some models so you never need to wax. The Japanese skier that made waves when he skied down Everest did so on Swallow skis. Kootenay skis are designed by a Canadian but manufactured in a skateboard factory in Shanghai. They ski great and next year they will have bamboo cores.
post #32 of 58
Martino: the "small Canadian ski magazine" you work for sure sounds like Ski Canada. If, so it has the best Gear Reviews of all the North American ski magazines, IMHO.
post #33 of 58
Thread Starter 
Last year, both Dynastar and Volkl "declined to be tested" and Amanda Goode Line Stockli were "unavailable for testing" as reported in SkiCanada. D-star's and Volkl's decision not to participate in the testing does leave a gap in the overall results, but I guess it does demonstrate the unbiased nature of SkiCanada's tests.
post #34 of 58
Speaking of which, does any one know why Ski Canada hasn't even posted their 05-06 tests yet? Agree it's a great set of reviews, lot of info, but hard to find mag at U.S. newsstands (only Barnes and Noble carries it, and irregularly), and their website seems to have gone dormant since last December.
post #35 of 58
Although both Ski Canada and Ski Racing can both be found in the PNW, they are not always an easy hunt . It's much easier to subscribe, I've found.
post #36 of 58

2005.06 ski test results

Not sure where you're trying to find the 2005.06 ski test results from Ski Canada but they're on their website at www.skicanadamag.com then click on 'Ski Tests' at the top of the page.
post #37 of 58
Skimag, I mean the test results for last season's skis, which I call 05-06, and they call 06. I bought issues of the magazine for the all mountain and on-piste results, never could find the later issue for powder/fat skies. The last season for which they have results posted online is 04-05, which they call 05. You can verify this by opening up a page and looking at pics of the skis tested. This only matters much to those of us who hunt for bargins on last year's skis, value Ski Canada as a source of info...
post #38 of 58
Thread Starter 
The 2005-06 model ski tests can be found in the backissues section of the SKiCanada website. Here is the link to the issue that dealt with powder skis.

http://www.skicanadamag.com/Features...8/1494533.html
post #39 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by etech
K2 is rumored to make many of their models in China
No rumor. They make all of their skis in the PRC.


Quote:
Originally Posted by etech
My biggest problem with the ski buyer guides is they stick to the standard manufacturers...Maybe they stick in an exotic ski like "LINE" or "Stockli"...but it's rare..

Why don't the ski magazines search these guys out and get pairs for their tests? Are they content to make phone calls to the "big manufacturers" and let them ship skis for the tests...and not try to get pairs from these independent fabricators? ...but try to include some non-mainstream manufacturers !!!!
To my knowledge, these tiny companies are not purposefully excluded. All the mag guys make the rounds at the Vegas Show and talk to all the product guys about test protocols for that year. If a new ski company is too small to be at Vegas, they can pick up the phone and ask when the test is.

2 years ago, Ogasaka got a couple of great reviews in SKI.

Again, I'll point out the fundamental flaw with the tests. They don't explain to the reader how they work. For example, 30 or more models are tested in every category for SKI, but you'd never know that, because only the "best" 6-8 make the article. A great many people who read read that probably think that there are only 8 models tested in each category.
post #40 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by troutman
To my knowledge, these tiny companies are not purposefully excluded. All the mag guys make the rounds at the Vegas Show and talk to all the product guys about test protocols for that year. If a new ski company is too small to be at Vegas, they can pick up the phone and ask when the test is.

2 years ago, Ogasaka got a couple of great reviews in SKI.

Again, I'll point out the fundamental flaw with the tests. They don't explain to the reader how they work. For example, 30 or more models are tested in every category for SKI, but you'd never know that, because only the "best" 6-8 make the article. A great many people who read read that probably think that there are only 8 models tested in each category.
I agree... but I do find it interesting that those same six or eight models that DO make it into the magazines happen to be manufactured by the six or eight highest advertisement accounts/contributors for SKI Magazine. I'm an not saying that there is a direct connection... but it is an interesting coincidence.

I personally prefer the test and publishing format that SKIING and SkiPress use. The reviews are much more clear, concise, and organized per category of ski. They also cover a very broad range of skis - including many smaller manufacturers - AND many "non spotlight" skis that are overshadowed by the Metron XI's and All-Stars that are delivered by mainstream companies.

Is there any way to get your hands on the ENTIRE SKI Magazine ski test results - more than what is published?

Later

GREG
post #41 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier
I personally prefer the test and publishing format that SKIING and SkiPress use. The reviews are much more clear, concise, and organized per category of ski. They also cover a very broad range of skis - including many smaller manufacturers - AND many "non spotlight" skis that are overshadowed by the Metron XI's and All-Stars that are delivered by mainstream companies.
I once read in ski press that only skis that made the magic 75% were reported in print. Then in the same issue, "if it's not here we did not test it."

WTF?
post #42 of 58
SkiNut, finally got to Ski Can pow issue using your link. Thanks.
post #43 of 58
I think youll start to see a lot of Atomic to Head converts.....
post #44 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by XJguy
I think youll start to see a lot of Atomic to Head converts.....
Becasue of Bode?
post #45 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier

Is there any way to get your hands on the ENTIRE SKI Magazine ski test results - more than what is published?
The complete test results are circulated within the industry, along with the understanding that the specifics will not be made public.
post #46 of 58
I don't think its possible to eliminate the subjective results that result in the ski tests. What may appeal to one tester may not result in the same positives of the next. However, the reviews do provide a short synopsis of each tester regarding the type of skier they are.

The last couple of years I've been at Vail when Ski Magazine is testing. The tests are done at Mid Vail on the run next to Swingsville, its name escapes my mind now. All the testers are very accomplished skiers and its fun to observe them when riding the lift. Anyway, I think one of the big influences regarding how the tester rates the ski is, the very forgiving snow conditions that usually are present during the test. A softer flexing ski will ski very well in these forgiving conditions. We in the east read the positive review, buy the ski take it out (for us in the east) in our typical "scratchy" hard snow conditions and wonder what the testers were smoking to say the gushing things they had to say about the ski.
I think its important to take into account where you ski and the conditions most normally present where you ski. If you ski on boiler plate, you probably will be better off and happier with a stiffer ski. I guess I'm saying this because two years ago I bought the Metron 11 , it ski great on buffed cordoury but is really mediocre on ice.
post #47 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
Who ever has the biggest ad budget will score well.

DING, DING, DING, WE HAVE A WINNER FOLKS!!!!

I think these results will be echoed in the Resort ratings as well....

EDIT: I'm speaking mostly of "reviews" found in SKI and SKIING....

L
post #48 of 58
It doesn't matter, especially to the people here on Epic. Everyone here has their favorite brand (or two) and will remain brand-loyal no matter what the testers and mags say. As if VA is going to go out and buy a pair of Sollies?:
post #49 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH
It doesn't matter, especially to the people here on Epic. Everyone here has their favorite brand (or two) and will remain brand-loyal no matter what the testers and mags say. As if VA is going to go out and buy a pair of Sollies?:
Not totally true. I switch brands often, its just that I buy a lot.
post #50 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by roundturns

Anyway, I think one of the big influences regarding how the tester rates the ski is, the very forgiving snow conditions that usually are present during the test. A softer flexing ski will ski very well in these forgiving conditions.
This is absolutely true, and it is a great point.

Many skis perform well in soft, Colorado Spring conditions. The real skis become very apparent when conditions get firm.
post #51 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by troutman
This is absolutely true, and it is a great point.

Many skis perform well in soft, Colorado Spring conditions. The real skis become very apparent when conditions get firm.
When they test a specific ski - say a race ski - do they select the time of day that would allow the skit o show it's true colors or do they just take it out whenever during the day... so you could end up on a ski with an 90mm waist at 7:30AM and a race ski with a 65mm waist at 2:30PM? In my experience very early morning spring conditions out west can be some of the most hardpacked conditions you find in the west without getting onto a water injected WC race course. I would hope that the magazines had the foresight to know when to send out certain skis... but from the sounds of it they do not?

Later

GREG
post #52 of 58
They are testing in the morning on a groomed run that is roped off to outside traffic so they don't have the freeze thaw ice conditions that can be typical for that time of year. The run they are testing on doesn't get chewed up too badly. You're right on about skiing in the early AM in the spring on snow that wasn't groomed .

I think the information that comes out of these tests is pretty good input for most skiers to go on. Skiers that have specific needs and really high performance expectations (racing) , high speed skiing etc, I have to think in most instances have access to the information they need to make an informed decision.

I'd like to have the opportunity to ski a bunch of different skis and see for myself how differently different skis ski. I think a general comment made a year or so ago by Keelty was that the difference from brand to bran was reallt narrowing, choosing skis was becoming more a function of a ski category and how each category compared. That being said I still think there is a pretty big difference between how a sandwich construction ski feels compared to a cap.
post #53 of 58

realize?!?!

doen't everyone realise where all major us ski mags test!?!?! in vail colorado!!!!! it is
a) the best snow in the contenintal US
b) it comprimises...... if skis were tested in the east skiiers in the west would have a hellovatime figuring out things

SKI ON
needsnow
post #54 of 58
gee we normally wait untill the mags hit the newstands before haveing the ski mag test good or bad argument. I guess this is our version of a pr-eemptive strike!
post #55 of 58

...and yet another prediction.....

The intermediate's...(or whatever they'll label the category) top three skis will have that limitless "top end" in performance.
post #56 of 58
Ski Canada's buyer's guide issues are defiantely the best. As mentioned earlier they are basically all encompassing, and really give the reader the most information possible. The articles on updates by manufacturer are decent, but generally seem to omit freeride/freestyle in their write ups. The really nice thing is a fairly comprehensive database type list of most of the years skis/boots, including dimensions, lengths, retail price, etc. (though is still limited to mainstream brands).

The best part is how they do explain the testing process, and provide information on each of the testers. It's nice to know what type of skier, their weight and experience, even where their home resort is to be able to better interpret their results. I even know a few of the testers which makes it especially nice having first hand experience of their skiing, and seeing it translate into their reviews.

Someone mentioned earlier that Freeskier does not do a review/testing issue...they do but it's only really freeride/freestyle skis used. They basically rate skis out of 10, though it's much more catered to the extreme riders they have testing. For instance last year the Head Supermojo was the only ski to get 10/10, which I'm sure is well deserved so long as the skier never drops below 50 mph.
post #57 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by etech
My biggest problem with the ski buyer guides is they stick to the standard manufacturers:

- K2
- Atomic
- Head
- Nordica
- Salomon
- Rossignol
- Volkl
- Dynastar
- Fischer
- Elan
...etc.

Maybe they stick in an exotic ski like "LINE" or "Stockli"...but it's rare..

Have a look at my list (I am not spamming you...just trying to get you to see the list) at:

http://www.exoticskis.com

There are more than 100 ski/snowboard manufacturers out there!

There are some ** really brilliant ski designers ** out there making beautiful skis.

Why don't the ski magazines search these guys out and get pairs for their tests? Are they content to make phone calls to the "big manufacturers" and let them ship skis for the tests...and not try to get pairs from these independent fabricators? From what I have seen, some of these new fabricators have some ripping skis and need to be noticed!
There's only so much ad dollars that these smaller ski companies have. There are only so many ski magazines to advertise in. My guess is these smaller companies, especially those listed in your link, have a different demographic than going after Ski or Skiing type readers. I have written to Ski about their reviews and the repsonse I received is that the Ski testers test what is sent to them by the mfg'ers. I would think that maybe this year we might see some of these smaller independent ski companies sending in some of their skis. I'd like to see Ski and Skiing add more on powder specific skis, and I 'd also like to see them add a few more detailed lines on testers comments in the reviews.
post #58 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by HaveSkisWillClimb
The intermediate's...(or whatever they'll label the category) top three skis will have that limitless "top end" in performance.
For intermediate skiers, it is.
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