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How long does it take?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
I have never tuned any skis before, but I thought this year might be a good time to start. For a routine tune up, about how much time is required to sharpen the edges and wax? Thanks

If it takes longer than a few minutes, I will not have to buy as much wax.
post #2 of 14
Depends.

If the skis edges are in good shape with no major dings just a few minutes max with a diamond stone and maybe a light pass with a gummi stone and you are good to go.

If your skis have been prepped and relatively clean, wax on, wait 6-12 hours or so and wax off. Total time couple of minutes. Add a few minutes if using a cold temp wax. Subtract a few minutes if using a warmer temp wax.

If prepping skis, apply base wax, scrape immediately while wax is warm, brush, repeat until wax coming off is clean of dirt and junk. Then apply appropriate temp wax, scrape, brush repeat every thirty minutes or longer 3x-7x (for non-racing purposes.). Leave final coat on 6-12 hours scrape, brush. Total time couple of hours max. If storing, leave last wax coat on until ready to use.

There are so many individual approches to tuning that times may vary somewhat. The above is a general rule of thub.
post #3 of 14
Wax on, wax off. Applies to more than skis. Speed is optional.

Say it fast or say it slow. :
post #4 of 14

As above...

...depending on how bad your skis are rocked out, it either takes very little time or considerable time. Here, try this:

http://www.rmmskiracing.org/articles...ning-Part2.pdf
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamesgig
I have never tuned any skis before, but I thought this year might be a good time to start. For a routine tune up, about how much time is required to sharpen the edges and wax? Thanks

If it takes longer than a few minutes, I will not have to buy as much wax.
I always figure at least one brew per 2 pair of skies. That is strickly routine maint without hot wax scrape. The learning curve is relatively short and at first it may take 2 brews but after some practice 1 should be enough.:
post #6 of 14

I agree totally...

Quote:
Originally Posted by mkevenson
I always figure at least one brew per 2 pair of skies. That is strickly routine maint without hot wax scrape. The learning curve is relatively short and at first it may take 2 brews but after some practice 1 should be enough.:
...the brews/tune job index is a highly relevant and totally objective measurement, and, additionally, makes for a pleasant learning curve! Here, try this:

http://www.rmmskiracing.org/articles...-10-DayJob.pdf

See "Radio Free Masters"...whoops, I meant "Everybody Must Get Stoned"...
post #7 of 14
Is jamesgig of legal age?
There are some limits to the application of the brew standard.
post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 
no, i am 16. So it sounds like it takes a few minutes then a few minutes 6-12 hours later. Do I just need to scrape off the excess wax after the 6-12 hours? Does wax need to cool, if you put on more than one coat? THanks
post #9 of 14

Take a look at my article...

Quote:
Originally Posted by jamesgig
no, i am 16. So it sounds like it takes a few minutes then a few minutes 6-12 hours later. Do I just need to scrape off the excess wax after the 6-12 hours? Does wax need to cool, if you put on more than one coat? THanks

http://www.rmmskiracing.org/articles...ning-Part2.pdf


As it pretty much says, I don't usually worry about scraping for training, just for races. And I pretty much just go with a one-size-fits all wax for training or free skiing. There is such a thing as a "hot scrape", which you use to clean up bases on new skis or really dirty skis, but in general, you need to wait until the wax is cold before you scrape. So go read my article, and if you have any further questions, please ask...
post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 
based on your article, it seems that I need a lot of stuff so I have a few questions...

Do I need to do the base leveling regularly or can I just get that done at the shop once per year?

Is the Pro Edge bevel guide okay (I cannot find the one you suggested)? Should I go with the 2 and a 1 riser or just the 3 (I have never used a specific bevel so I am unsure what I want.)?

How much of a difference would I notice between an all temp wax and a temp specific wax? What wax would you suggest?

Thanks for your help.
post #11 of 14
Have you ever tried the search tool?
Or looking at the link just provided you by skiracer55
All your questions can be answered by the many posts and threads on these subjects.
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamesgig
based on your article, it seems that I need a lot of stuff so I have a few questions...

Do I need to do the base leveling regularly or can I just get that done at the shop once per year?

Is the Pro Edge bevel guide okay (I cannot find the one you suggested)? Should I go with the 2 and a 1 riser or just the 3 (I have never used a specific bevel so I am unsure what I want.)?

How much of a difference would I notice between an all temp wax and a temp specific wax? What wax would you suggest?

Thanks for your help.
Garry Z is right, there is a lot of info available, but let me just answer your questions quickly:

--Most bases come from the factory pretty close to level, and in fact, most skis are already pre-beveled to the manufacturer's specs. A ski that is really hosed (very concave or convex) is something that needs to go to a good shop, usually once only. Again, you can tell with a true bar. I've gotten some new skis that were slightly railed in a couple of sections, and that I am always able to get out by flat-filing as described in my article.

-- The Pro Edge bevel guides look good to me, they're just pricey. I'd consider a Standard Side of Beast with the 1/2 Bevel plates, which gives you a total of 3, and you can buy more plates later if you like for pretty cheap.

http://www.ski-racing.com/side_of_beast.html

-- Universal waxes are wonderful things, as long as you don't get into extremes of temperature or humidity. So a good choice for a universal wax might be Toko Universal Glide Wax (TOK-9770 ) or Moly base prep (TOK-9878 ). Give either/both of those a try and see how it works. If you get into extremes of conditions (very dry/cold or very wet/warm), then you might want to try some temperature specific stuff. I like Toko for a lot of reasons (one being that one of my teammates can get me Toko at 40% off list), but one of the big reasons is it's a simple system that works: blue for cold, red for middle temps, yellow for warm.
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks
post #14 of 14
word of note... Some ski's deviate from perfectly flat bases by design. The Metron line from Atomic has concave sections, i notice this on my M:10's

Quote:
From Atomic's FAQ's:

http://winter.atomicski.com/faqitem.php?id=26

What is the reason some Atomic skis appear to have some concavity?

http://winter.atomicski.com/images/spacer.gifWith the wider ski geometries of modern carving skis, a slightly concave base around the tip and tail have a positive impact on tracking stability on straight runs, without any negative effect on turning.
Although I've never owned any, i believe some of the D-star fatties are a bit convex at the "shovel" to help with floatation as well... With skis that deviate from the perfectly flat, grinding them flat will change their performance characteristics, so beware.

As has been said before, the forums have a lot of information, try searching and you'll find a lot of information and varying techniques, some are geared more towards racers with maybe 20 waxes leading up to a race, while others have skiied by the "slap a coat on and ski off the excess" philosophy. find what works for you and enjoy.
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