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Dan's summer fitness idea

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Hello everyone,

Just posted a short fitness article on my mogul skiing blog (www.mogulskiing.blogspot.com) and I thought I'd post it here, too, and get your thoughts. Here it is:
Bump Skier Fitness: Get Light for the Moguls


Chances are, the single best thing you can do for your mogul skiing this summer, fitness-wise, is to lose extra weight, to get light for the moguls.

A lot of skiers spend a lot of time thinking and talking about skiing-specific exercises, the latest conditioning techniques of world-class skiers, the newest gym gadgets or machines that are supposed to condition skiing muscles, and so forth. For skiers who are already in world-class shape, these things might provide a conditioning edge. For most recreational skiers, though, this stuff is just a silly distraction.

The average recreational skier carries extra weight. (I know I’ve carried extra pounds, at various times!) How many pounds could you stand to lose this summer? Ten? Twenty? Thirty?

Think about how this extra weight affects your skiing. If you said “ten pounds,” pick up a ten pound dumbbell and imagine skiing around all day with that much weight in a backpack. Are you 20 pounds overweight? Imagine carrying around two dumbbells then. It's a lot of weight to carry, isn't it?

Now imagine carrying, supporting, that much extra weight, with your legs, with your knees, through every mogul absorption, for a full day of skiing. The results? Greater fatigue; more wear on your knees, hips and back; slower reaction times; and a greater chance of injury.

If you’re carrying extra weight, don’t waste time worrying about World Cup workouts or new gym toys. Set a simple, straightforward conditioning goal for yourself this summer: lose the extra pounds, however you can do it. Get light for the bumps! You’ll ski better, and your body will thank you this winter with fewer aches and pains at the end of each ski day.

Hope you bumpers are all having a great summer!

-Dan DiPiro
post #2 of 11
Its always great to see the connection between technique and physical fitness.
post #3 of 11
Great topic. I stand to lose a few pounds before ski season. My Summer routine for bump skiing always included jump rope.

Doing a series of two footed jumps while moving side to side not only gives you a good workout but actually simulates bump skiing. It involves both the hands and the feet.

Imagine your best bump run. How many turns must you make to get to the bottom? 100, 150, more?

Grab a jump rope and work up to 150 two footed jumps without stopping and I guarantee you next time you ski that favorite bump run, you'll be much better.
post #4 of 11
Okay, I'll bite. I weighed my golf bag. Fully loaded it's about 30 pounds. I walk around with that on my shoulders about 8 miles/week. After recovering from a shoulder injury enough to do strenuous exercise, I was losing about a pound a week until Super Fresh had a steak and lobster sale. I'm sooo weak! At a pound a week, I'm only a dumbbell and a half away from ski season! By then, golfing should almost be just a walk in the park.

People with excess baggage can ski well. People with less excess baggage can learn to ski well easier.

If you're going to attempt to shed more than 10 pounds, consider seeing a medical or physical fitness professional first. Don't try to lose more than 1-2 pounds per week without assistance. Be especially careful about exercising in the summer heat. Losing water weight does not count. Hydrate! Drinking more water will help you eat less.

Having a long term goal and a reward (like a nice ski trip) helps to motivate you to keep to a regular exercise schedule.
post #5 of 11
I agree Dan, in fact I'm spending the summer on a weight loss and workout program. Instead of buying new skis, my 165 RX8's will ski totally different when I'm 180 or less instead of 200! Already lost 5 lbs in 2 weeks, not through a crash diet either. I'm using the Body for Life program.

Didn't think about the bumps, but I'm sure it will help there.
post #6 of 11
Great idea Dan but,
I suspect that if anyone out there needs to lose 10-30 lbs this Summer, they should have made the effort to lose it last Summer.
It's a heck of a lot easier (and much more fun) to stay in shape then to get in shape. :
Barring injury, why would anyone put on that kind of extra weight?
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by carbonissimo
Barring injury, why would anyone put on that kind of extra weight?
How about having a teenager in the house, doritos, ice cream always around. Much too much of a fondness for cheese. Getting older and metabolism slowing down. And.... lack of willpower.:
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz
How about having a teenager in the house, doritos, ice cream always around. Much too much of a fondness for cheese. Getting older and metabolism slowing down. And.... lack of willpower.:
It adds up one ounce at a time and has to be removed the same way. Some of us, myself included have a differant metabolism and it takes alot more work and effort to maintain your body weight,.Most people with large muscle mass fight this battle all their lives
I have people I work with who do the same work , eat twice as much ,drink beer by the gallon and maintain a pretty svelte frame with no work at all

To make this statement Carb is not very understanding of the struggle some of us go through .
Thin framed folks seem to think everyone else eats like pigs and never exercises. Most of this is genetics and poor eating habits that are hard to break just makes it worse
post #9 of 11
Those are some very good reasons SkiMangoJazz!
We all have choices to make.
GarryZ, you are right about it adding up one ounce at a time and needing to be removed the same way. I am very understanding that it takes 3500 calories burned to lose a pound of fat.
My personal struggle takes between 16 and 18 hours a week. And I enjoy the heck out of it.
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by carbonissimo
Those are some very good reasons SkiMangoJazz!
We all have choices to make.
GarryZ, you are right about it adding up one ounce at a time and needing to be removed the same way. I am very understanding that it takes 3500 calories burned to lose a pound of fat.
My personal struggle takes between 16 and 18 hours a week. And I enjoy the heck out of it.
I'm with you on that one.
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by carbonissimo
My personal struggle takes between 16 and 18 hours a week. And I enjoy the heck out of it.
Time planning.
Money planning.
Exercise planning.

Such closely related skills.
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