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Thinking about a full suspension MTN Bike - Page 3

post #61 of 90
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick View Post
I was looking at some Giant's, and was thinking GiantChick didn't have the same ring to it.
Hmmm...

Giantchick? Nope
Mongoosechick? Un uh
SalsaChick? gotta ring
SurlyChick? At times
Specializedchick? Hardly
Yetichick? No way
post #62 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick View Post
That would work if my husband hadn't borrowed my camelback. Trust me, I DON'T want it back .
Check out the new CamelBack bottles w/caps & bite tubes/straws. The caps also fit on a variety of Nalgene bottles and the .5 liter CamelBack that I believe fits in bike cages (and auto cup holders) An excellent option for a lot of activities, including driving, versus conventional water bottles and bladders with tubes. (Hot tip: you can also put coffee and hot drinks in Nalgene and CamelBack bottles.

How about FisherChick? FWLIW, I prefer a stiff tail like on my Sugar 3 versus full suspension.
post #63 of 90
Thanks for the input.
I will definitely look at the options of camelbacks as I shop for a new one.
Definitely worth looking at all the new options.
Funny........SAC had more camelbacks on last winter than you could imagine. Now I want one and they don't seem to be putting them on at all.

I'm planning on keeping my HT, because I'm sure there are many riding situations where I will prefer it to the FS, but I'm looking forward to getting on the new bike!
post #64 of 90

I hope the Liquid works for you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick View Post
I'm planning on keeping my HT, because I'm sure there are many riding situations where I will prefer it to the FS, but I'm looking forward to getting on the new bike!
I agree. Esp since the Liquid is a longer travel FS bike. Could be overkill in many situations.

As to the water bottle cage they are very useful even when one uses a camelback. On longer rides i will have a sport drink in the water bottle in addition to the camelback. You DO NOT want to put anything besides pure water in a camelback bladder.
post #65 of 90
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SNPete View Post
As to the water bottle cage they are very useful even when one uses a camelback. On longer rides i will have a sport drink in the water bottle in addition to the camelback. You DO NOT want to put anything besides pure water in a camelback bladder.
Nothing worse than warm sports drink after its been in a cage for 1-2 hours. Blech.

I will actually put on a cage if I an on a short ride and don't want to take the camelback. But TC doesn't need that second one on the bottom of the downtube.
post #66 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
But TC doesn't need that second one on the bottom of the downtube.
But that's the perfect place for a waterbottle to catch mud and bits of who-knows-what thrown up by the front tire.

That reminds me the time we came upon this group of cows and ended up inadvertantly chasing them for a mile on a jeep trail because they were frightend and ran and wouldn't go off to the side...............needless to say we were quite a mess. Glad it was only cow poop.
post #67 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by SNPete View Post
You DO NOT want to put anything besides pure water in a camelback bladder.
Except for, of course, the new Camelbak Elixir for 'Electrolyte Enhanced Hydration'. "With NO SUGAR, there's no sticky reservoir clean-up!". :

(Maybe I need to use the Elixir instead of the limeade for those long Margarita rides.) :
post #68 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by SNPete View Post
I agree. Esp since the Liquid is a longer travel FS bike. Could be overkill in many situations.

As to the water bottle cage they are very useful even when one uses a camelback. On longer rides i will have a sport drink in the water bottle in addition to the camelback. You DO NOT want to put anything besides pure water in a camelback bladder.
I come late to this thread. Having lived in Michigan some years ago and riden a bit there, I'd say the Liquid is a bit of an overkill. Take it to Boyne where it belongs. Have fun blast down the hill and take some air!

A better option would have been the Trek Fuel. A short travel, almost HT like x-c dualie just to take the edge off the rough surface. Superlight is a great bike but rarely anyone buys that as their first bike. It's a bit of a "cult" bike you either love it to death or say "huh?".

I don't think you need bottles on top of camelback for Michigan. It's not a desert after all. I also have a hard time imagining a ride longer than 2 hours without coming across some civilization to re-fill your camelback. But if you DO put a bottle there, make 100% it's the kind that has a plastic cap covering the drinking spot. Or you would even think about drinking it after 1/2 hr of riding.
post #69 of 90
Just back from a Mt bike ride on my old faithful 4900.
To answer some of the questions about my purchase.
I, too, think its possible, in fact probable that the Liquid is overkill for my current riding, but, just in case you all missed this part of my decision to buy it..........It was a KILLER DEAL and the right size for me.
Worst case scenario..........I get it. I don't like it. It doesn't fit me. I sell it.

Pssst, have any of you noticed how my ski quiver changes during a season? I'm not afraid to buy and sell

As for the water concerns....I'm not crazy about the water bottle on the bottom of the rail, and due to the fact that I am a HUGE water drinker, I will be replacing my camelback before I ride.

at_nyc, I don't know where/when you rode in Michigan, but the trail system is massive, with tons of riding options, many of which are desolate. I can easily go through two full water bottles on a short(1 hr) ride. I can't imagine that more water with me can be a bad thing.

As for sports drinks in a camelback. I prefer water but may need an electrolyte replacement from time to time. I'm not new to this
post #70 of 90
Quote:
As for sports drinks in a camelback. I prefer water but may need an electrolyte replacement from time to time. I'm not new to this
Thaere's an easy solution. Put the sports drink in the bottle and put water in the camelback.
post #71 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post
Thaere's an easy solution. Put the sports drink in the bottle and put water in the camelback.
women are so smart.......I was actually thinking the same thing!!!

I won't tell you the condition of the camelback my husband borrowed from me.
post #72 of 90
Another hydration quiver option is to consider carrying a water filter instead of a larger volume of heavier water. You can direct fill to your bladder tube if fitted with a quick connector on breaks during longer outings. Also, one could be shared among a group and used while traveling.

Quote:
The fact is, in areas where frequent water supplies can be expected, the filter takes up less room and weight than a typical 1 liter water bottle. This has the additional advantage of letting me drink cool, fresh water instead of the tepid, stale water that I've carried in my pack all day long. This is far more refreshing. I find a short water break is also a pleasant opportunity to relax a bit and take in the scenery.
post #73 of 90
Just a point of interest, not that it surprises me, because I knew that FS bikes are inherently heavier than a HT of the same caliber:
My Trek 4900 weighed in at 27 lbs when I bought it, prior to adding light kit and tool pouch.
The shipping weight of the Liquid is 44.7 lbs.
post #74 of 90
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick View Post
Just a point of interest, not that it surprises me, because I knew that FS bikes are inherently heavier than a HT of the same caliber:
My Trek 4900 weighed in at 27 lbs when I bought it, prior to adding light kit and took pouch.
The shipping weight of the Liquid is 44.7 lbs.
IIRC they are right around 30.
post #75 of 90
yeah that bike cant be more than 30lb.

Nice buy TC lots of those bikes floating around out here.
post #76 of 90
Cardboard and packing material adds a fair amount of weight. I can't imagine the bike being over 32lbs. If you end up liking the bike, you can easily drop a few pounds with a number of simple upgrades. e.g. the tires. I'll bet the tires (if stock) are wire beaded. Go to folding/kevlar beaded tires and on average you will drop a half pound. Then going to a Ti railed terry butterfly saddle will save another 100 grams over the stock Trek saddle.

On average a freeride FS bike, like the liquid, will be about 3.5 to 4 pounds heavier than an XC HT, all other things/parts being equal. Frame and shock weight, plus the heavier, longer travel fork being the main factors.

An XC FS bike will be about two plus pounds heavier than an XC HT all things being equal. Frame and shock weight. XC FS frames tend to be lighter than freeride frames by a pound or more.


Edit: went to mtbr.com and discovered that bike weighs 31lbs, stock.

http://www.mtbr.com/reviews/Allmtn_F...t_122982.shtml
post #77 of 90
I went there too and saw that. Thanks for the heads up. I don't think I'm going to have a problem with the weight anyway. It was just a point of interest.
post #78 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick View Post
Just a point of interest, not that it surprises me, because I knew that FS bikes are inherently heavier than a HT of the same caliber:
My Trek 4900 weighed in at 27 lbs when I bought it, prior to adding light kit and tool pouch.
The shipping weight of the Liquid is 44.7 lbs.
No way the Liquid is anything close to the shipping weight. So don't worry about it until you unpack it and ride it.

On the other hand, your hardtail weight kind of illustrate why I'm such a die hard Santa Cruz fan: my Superlight (FS, medium) weight 25lb! Of course that's not the lightest FS bike, except the part being it does NOT cost a fortune (hint: < $2000 brand spanking new)!
post #79 of 90
Looks like it'll be a fun bike overkill or not. Weight's not that big a deal either. You're fit enough. You'd probably beat most people to the top anyway, and remember [Arnold] "If it doesn't kill you, it makes you stronger" [/Arnold]
post #80 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
Looks like it'll be a fun bike overkill or not. Weight's not that big a deal either. You're fit enough. You'd probably beat most people to the top anyway, and remember [Arnold] "If it doesn't kill you, it makes you stronger" [/Arnold]
Epic, I appreciate your vote of confidence on my ability. As you can imagine, I can hardly wait to try it out. I really do believe I got Overkill on the bike, but the deal was Overkill and I couldn't resist. I'll be sure to keep you up to date when I get it and if its all I had hoped for.
post #81 of 90
So, didja get your new bike yet? I pimped my ride with some new M-975 brakes this week. Oh yeah baby M-975...
post #82 of 90
It arrived late in the day on Friday. I had to unpack and assemble it, which took some time because the guy who shipped it had it packed VERY WELL.

I haven't had a chance to ride it to its potential, but I did ride it around the barn and find it to be a bit compact compared to my 4900. I will likely get a handlebar stem to give me a tad more length. I will definitely need to set up the suspension for my personal stats.
Only problem I see is the front rim is "out of true" slightly. I chatted with Phil who had a suggestion to make sure the tire is seeted well. It appears to be, but I will check that first.
A few other things need some tweaking, but nothing big, and certainly nothing I shouldn't expect when buying a bike of this caliber for less than half its value.
All in all, I think I'll be very happy with this bike.
I'll report back when I get on the trails with it,which may be a few days since I'm helping my husband with a dirtbike race this weekend.
post #83 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick View Post
Only problem I see is the front rim is "out of true" slightly. I chatted with Phil who had a suggestion to make sure the tire is seeted well. It appears to be, but I will check that first.
A few other things need some tweaking, but nothing big, and certainly nothing I shouldn't expect when buying a bike of this caliber for less than half its value.
All in all, I think I'll be very happy with this bike.
At first look the tire was on correctly, but after looking at it in better light, it was definitely not seeted correctly. Tire on correctly, and the rim is now fine. I won't often say phil was right, but Phil was right and I owe him a thanks.

I took the bike to the Mx Track tonight and played around a bit. The only other thing I'm noticing is the bearing seems to be loose in the handle bar stem post. I tightened things up and it still has a bit of play. Does any one know of a fix for that or shall I take it to the bike shop to check it out?
post #84 of 90
In order to tighten your headset (the loose part), loosen the bolts on the stem clamping the steerer tube. The steerer tube is part of the front fork that goes through the front of the bike frame (head tube), the stem clamps to this and to the handle bars. If you loosen the pinch bolts on the stem and then tighten the headset cap (the bolt on top of the steerer tube that is pointing straight up at the sky) this will load the bearings, make sure the stem turns alright and then re-tighten the stem pinch bolts. Done.
post #85 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
In order to tighten your headset (the loose part), loosen the bolts on the stem clamping the steerer tube. The steerer tube is part of the front fork that goes through the front of the bike frame (head tube), the stem clamps to this and to the handle bars. If you loosen the pinch bolts on the stem and then tighten the headset cap (the bolt on top of the steerer tube that is pointing straight up at the sky) this will load the bearings, make sure the stem turns alright and then re-tighten the stem pinch bolts. Done.
Good advice. If I may add; tighten to the point where the headset starts to bind. Def: turning your handlebars side to side you will feel things getting tight and sticky. Back off until the stickness disappears. You are done. Tighten the side bolts on your stem to 60 inch pounds . Lacking a tourque wrench tighten with an allen wrench to the point where you feel slight discomfort on your fingers due to pressure.
post #86 of 90
I actually did that already, and though its better, its still a touch loose.
I'll try it again and see if I didn't get it tight enough.

BTW Jr track at to motorcycle club is a rip on a mt bike.
post #87 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick View Post
I actually did that already, and though its better, its still a touch loose.
I'll try it again and see if I didn't get it tight enough.

BTW Jr track at to motorcycle club is a rip on a mt bike.
It is possible that the steer tube is bottomed out on the top cap. This will stop you from getting it right. There are spacers stacked under the stem. Add a 3mm spacer to give needed adjustment room. Are you sure it is the headset that is loose? You could be detecting fork stanchion and lowers play -worn fork bushings. You can isolate the cause now that you know the two possible sources of the play. BTY, when you tighten the stem alternate between the two bolts, little on one then little on the other till they are both tight.
That is so cool you are going to the local BMX track. That is the place where you can learn how to ride, jump, pump and rail berms. Yeah!
post #88 of 90
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick View Post
At first look the tire was on correctly, but after looking at it in better light, it was definitely not seeted correctly. Tire on correctly, and the rim is now fine. I won't often say phil was right, but Phil was right and I owe him a thanks.
Even a blind squirrel finds a nut from time to time. I just know because I noticed this with my wheels.
post #89 of 90
Bolter had some good possibilities...

One he didn't---a loose nut behind the handlebars.


Enjoy the new ride.
post #90 of 90
Bolter, thanks, I'll check that tomorrow.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
Even a blind squirrel finds a nut from time to time. I just know because I noticed this with my wheels.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
Bolter had some good possibilities...

One he didn't---a loose nut behind the handlebars.


Enjoy the new ride.
Are you guys trying to tell me something?:

Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick View Post
BTW Jr track at to motorcycle club is a rip on a mt bike.


This kid needed a motor to catch me.


I really like this bike
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