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Zermatt: Skiing in September?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Can any of you Switzerland experts tell me for sure if I should be able to ski at Zermatt sometime between Sept. 15th and the 20th?

I've looked on their website and it appears that there's a fair bit of glacier area that's open for skiing during the summer, but I can't tell whether they're still open in the fall.

Thanks in advance.
post #2 of 21
I skied on Plateau Rosa for a week in early October once and had great conditions. We stayed on the Italian side in Cervinia, but I think there is access for Zermatt.
post #3 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters
Can any of you Switzerland experts tell me for sure if I should be able to ski at Zermatt sometime between Sept. 15th and the 20th?

I've looked on their website and it appears that there's a fair bit of glacier area that's open for skiing during the summer, but I can't tell whether they're still open in the fall.

Thanks in advance.
Hmmmm.....the snow in the Tetons must be about played out, Bob's seeking other venues for his TAY.
post #4 of 21
Cervinia, on the Italian side has lots of snow. The world speed records used to be held there and it's a fun place to ski. In July there was fresh powder and plenty of mildly steep skiing. I don't know what September would be like.

Remember your passport!

Oh, and back then 1978 the rentals were weak.
post #5 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones
Cervinia, on the Italian side has lots of snow. The world speed records used to be held there and it's a fun place to ski. In July there was fresh powder and plenty of mildly steep skiing. I don't know what September would be like.

Remember your passport!

Oh, and back then 1978 the rentals were weak.
I'm surprised that there would be more snow on the Cervinia side as the resort is South facing. When I was there this past winter, it was very sunny and hadn't snowed in two weeks. The snow on the Cervinia side was very scarce but on the Zermatt side and on the glacier it was not a problem. Perhaps the times, they are changing...
post #6 of 21
I really don't know much about the Zermatt side, but as I recall we were facing North and there was a lot of snow. We had dry powder in July and it was very nice. People were coming over from Switzerland to ski so there must have been snow there.

I was there for 3 weeks and the skiing was much better than I had hope for. The skiers from the US that were there were the best that I have ever skied with, or tried to ski with. They were on downhill skis and they went as fast as they could.

I have heard that the Zermatt side is flat, but I'm sure there will be some good climbing to be had.
post #7 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by kelly001
The snow on the Cervinia side was very scarce but on the Zermatt side and on the glacier it was not a problem. Perhaps the times, they are changing...
While in Cervinia, how far up the mountain did you go?

Also, what was the skiing like on the glacier?
post #8 of 21
The old Kilometro Lanciato slope, which drops off to skier's right of the red run descending from Klein Matterhorn in this map:
http://bergbahnen.zermatt.ch/e/bahnen/
used to be described as "in Cervinia", because that is where the organisation for the event was based.
But nowadays that slope is considered part of the Zermatt sector of the ski area.
post #9 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones
While in Cervinia, how far up the mountain did you go?

Also, what was the skiing like on the glacier?
I skied Cervinia from the top as we were crossing over from Zermatt for a day. We skied all the way down to the base and then left because of the lack of snow. We weren't able to ski the slopes leading to Valtournenche as they were closed for lack of snow.

Skiing on the glacier was very wide and open not challenging in terms of steeps but a nice place to make big turns and carve away... If no one told you, you wouldn't even know you were on the glacier.
post #10 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by kelly001
... If no one told you, you wouldn't even know you were on the glacier.

Except that when I was there we used a t-bar which went over a gaping crevass on a few planks! Otherwise, I concurr, wide open slopes, fairly moderate unless one traverses over to the flying kilometer.

Cervinia may face south but it is three trams and 5000' to the glacier.
post #11 of 21
Bob, have you tried asking the people on snowHeads. There are plenty of Swiss lovers on there.
post #12 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marc gledhill
Bob, have you tried asking the people on snowHeads. There are plenty of Swiss lovers on there.
Hi, Marc.

Thanks for the suggestion and I'll ask the question on SnowHeads.

Thanks to Martin Bell, however, I have an answer. He put me in touch with a Zermatt local who confirmed that the glacier skiing will be open and also told me where I can rent skis.

I think I'm all set.

Anybody want to have a mini-Gathering at Klein Matterhorn on September 18, 2006?
post #13 of 21
Bob, have a Weissbier in the North Wall for me, and tell them I'll see them in 7 months!
post #14 of 21
just booked for our 3rd trip to Zermatt, 2 weeks mid Jan, can't wait !
You will love it, Sept and all
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by holo
mid Jan, can't wait !
Prevent your extremities from freezing and falling off at that time.
post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by PowHog
Prevent your extremities from freezing and falling off at that time.
Luckily I don't feel the cold too much. Warmer than my last trip to Lake Lousie that is for sure.

Anyway, soon as I get cold I pop in for a chocolate or yummy minestrone soup at Sunegga......damn, I'm getting too excited now !
post #17 of 21
I was there mid January last season and it was full sun for 7 days straight! The temperatures were chilly but with the sun we even ate lunch outside most days on their beautiful restaurant's terraces.
post #18 of 21
Bob - I just got back from Zermatt this past weekend. I was pleasantly surprised at the terrain and the conditions for August. Lots of racing camps going on while there. It was closed one day due to high wind/snow and another day it was shrouded in thick clouds so you could barely see anything, but it was still a lot of fun if you are missing contact with the snow.

It takes a fair amount of time to get up to the top (c. 45-60 mins), and depending on where your hotel is, you make have to walk 20-25 mins carrying your skis/board to the place where you get the first gondola. A taxi can cost up to €15, so hopefully you are booked into a place nearer to the mountain.

Two shops I visited which rent equipment are Julen Sport and Bayard (two shops), both near the train station. They were very friendly and helpful at both places. If you get tired of the high food prices, we found a place down from Grampi's (main drinking/clubbing place) towards the train station right on main street called "Walliser hotel" or something very similar. It has a cafe/terrace in front of it. They have reasonably priced lunch food on their "snack menu" and the beer is great! (PS: There is a McDonald's near there if the budget gets really tight!)

Hope you enjoy your trip!

DC
post #19 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DC_SKI
Bob - I just got back from Zermatt this past weekend. I was pleasantly surprised at the terrain and the conditions for August. Lots of racing camps going on while there. It was closed one day due to high wind/snow and another day it was shrouded in thick clouds so you could barely see anything, but it was still a lot of fun if you are missing contact with the snow.

It takes a fair amount of time to get up to the top (c. 45-60 mins), and depending on where your hotel is, you make have to walk 20-25 mins carrying your skis/board to the place where you get the first gondola. A taxi can cost up to €15, so hopefully you are booked into a place nearer to the mountain.

Two shops I visited which rent equipment are Julen Sport and Bayard (two shops), both near the train station. They were very friendly and helpful at both places. If you get tired of the high food prices, we found a place down from Grampi's (main drinking/clubbing place) towards the train station right on main street called "Walliser hotel" or something very similar. It has a cafe/terrace in front of it. They have reasonably priced lunch food on their "snack menu" and the beer is great! (PS: There is a McDonald's near there if the budget gets really tight!)

Hope you enjoy your trip!

DC
Thanks for the great report, DC. The skiing sounds fun and I can't wait. We'll only do one morning of skiing, but it should be nice to be able to use lifts to do some of my summer skiing. We've made our reservations (City Hotel) and we're planning our various activities.

I really appreciate the suggestion on the "Walliser Hotel". We love to find little out-of-the-way restaurants and pretty much shy away from really expensive eateries no matter where we are.

I'll also have to sample this "McDonald's" place you mention. By the name of it, it would seem to sound more Scottish than Swiss, but I understand there's a fairly large Brit contingent of Brit expats living in Zermatt. Maybe that explains it. In any case, do they serve haggis?
post #20 of 21
I think the gondolas start running at 7am or 8am (you take three to get to the top). Check and try to get up there as early as possible to enjoy better conditions. There are lockers at the second or third station (1 Swiss Franc each) but not at the very top so people changed and stored their gear before the last ride up.

On the mountain the funny thing was that many people couldn't figure out how to get back down the mountain to leave. I was asking around and no one knew so it became a joke that we were all going to get stuck up there. You actually have to go back up one of the main T-bars then over to the right about 100-150m, take another one up and then ski a long flat section until you see the station. When the clouds are really thick, it's not easy to figure out where all this is

Glad to be of help regarding the eateries. If you like drinking/clubbing, go to the basement in Grampi's. The truth is we found almost every place more expensive than I remembered from last visit to Switzerland. Maybe it's the weaker dollar or something. We just peered into the Scottish clan establishment. Lots of fried stuff and no sign of haggis, sorry to say. By the end of the trip, I couldn't stand the thought of eating more cheese or potatoes, but that place I recommended has great rösti potatoes with sausages, if that's your sort of thing. "Cardinal" beer = very good!

Enjoy!!!
post #21 of 21
Yep, they serve hagis -- as long as it comes with fries, a coke light, and a quarter pounder.

Mike
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