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Will the sun hurt my skis?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I put a heavy coat of wax on my skis and layed them out in the sun. It has been hot enough that the wax melts. Is there problems with doing this? Is it similar to hot boxing them? Like I said I put a heavy coat of wax on with my iron but did not scrape. When I brought the skis in last night there was almost no wax left on the skis. What happened to it? Did it gat absorbed into the base? Evaporate? If its not going to hurt my skis this seems like an excellent way to get lots of wax into the bases because the melted wax can sit on the skis for 5 to hours.
post #2 of 20
I do the same, it's amazing to see where all the wax goes (I hope into the ski base)...

So far I have noticed no side effects.. I put a thermometer next to them, and it got to 42 degrees celsius, while a hotbox heats to about 50-55 celsius.
post #3 of 20

No, don't do that...

...instead, I'll sell you a hot box for the low, low price of $2000 and, as a special bonus offer to our Internet customers, I'll also throw in a SkiShade(TM) to keep your skis from getting schitzy because the ozone layer is gone!

Joke, ha ha. Actually, this sounds like a pretty hot (joke, ha ha) solution, but should you want to build yourself a hot box:

http://www.rmmskiracing.org/articles...tbox-Part2.pdf
post #4 of 20
I use the sun also. I have not noticed any ill effects. To the contrary I seem to get a better more even distribution of wax into the base.

For my skis with light bases I tent some black plastic over the skis to get the temperature up.

Let the wax set and harden in the shade
post #5 of 20
Are you guys rubbing on the wax or ironing it on?
post #6 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by jstraw
Are you guys rubbing on the wax or ironing it on?
. Well, I just slice the wax into thin strips and pieces, I distribute them evenly down the length of the ski, The sun melts the wax over the entire base of the ski. I thin scrape it around the ski, scrape it off, and re-apply.

It’s amazing how much of the wax just gets sucked into the base. When the skis cool in the shade you can see that the bases are literally a block of wax.

After two days skiing summer conditions at Mammoth the skis are ski not dry.
post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by jstraw
Are you guys rubbing on the wax or ironing it on?
I iron it in for a more even distribution...
post #8 of 20
If I get Tiger skeeter structure, I'll blame y'all.
post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex
If I get Tiger skeeter structure, I'll blame y'all.
DO IT! I hear its hot in MD today. Just don't leave the skis out in the sun all day!! They get HOT!! Don’t burn your hands. When you have a good coat of liquid wax on the bases for say an hour move them to the shade and scrape off the excess, then put them back in the sun again until the wax shines again.

Then at night when they are cooled off out can brush them and get a nice structure in place.

Edit Clean the bases before starting. They are many options on cleaning, I use first 409, then glass cleaner.
I start with a layer of hard BLUE wax to sock deep into the bases, and then softer Yellow wax for a finsh coat (But thats just me)
post #10 of 20
The temperature of the skis/wax shouldn't hurt anything, as long as they don't get too hot to burn the wax. Be careful relying on the temperature of nearby objects though. The metal edges and black ptex bases could heat up to be quite a bit warmer than the surrounding air and nearby objects.

The sun does emit ultraviolet radiation which your waxing iron and hot box most certainly do not. The weak UV radiation we get from the sun is strong enough to break some chemical bonds (DNA in skin cells) but it isn't likely to chemically cleave hydrocarbon or fluorocarbon wax. If your skis were up in the ozone layer though they would see much more energetic and intense UV radiation that could screw up the wax pretty quickly. That is where CFCs become chemically active and chew up the ozone layer.

Sounds like a good idea to me.
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barnstormer
The temperature of the skis/wax shouldn't hurt anything, as long as they don't get too hot to burn the wax. Be careful relying on the temperature of nearby objects though. The metal edges and black ptex bases could heat up to be quite a bit warmer than the surrounding air and nearby objects.

The sun does emit ultraviolet radiation which your waxing iron and hot box most certainly do not. The weak UV radiation we get from the sun is strong enough to break some chemical bonds (DNA in skin cells) but it isn't likely to chemically cleave hydrocarbon or fluorocarbon wax. If your skis were up in the ozone layer though they would see much more energetic and intense UV radiation that could screw up the wax pretty quickly. That is where CFCs become chemically active and chew up the ozone layer.

Sounds like a good idea to me.
I have noticed that the skis become soft and flexible, I think the heat under black P-Tex gets hot enough that it may start to soften the epoxy/ Glass in a sandwich ski. I would be careful about the way I handled my ski when they have been cooking in the sun. This might just be a bit of paranoia on my part but??? Hey treat them nice when there hot and cool them down gently by moving them to the shade. Let them cool down before flexing or doing much of anything too them.
post #12 of 20

Sacrificing cap skis to the Cause.

Well, I racked my brains over whether this could have any practical application whatsoever.

What could be so wax-critical to benefit from hotboxing-style application and yet so cheap that building a temperature and cleanliness-controlled box would not be worth it?





Snowblades. And hard (cold to polar waxes).

So I did a rudimentary cleaning on a pair of last century's Fischer Radarcs and used hockey tape to mask off a ~1cm strip down the middle of each one. I wanted sharp clean edges so I could see any sideways flow of wax.

The left ski got Toko Graphite M (a very soft, very warm-temp wax), the right ski got CH4 behind the brakes and Hertel in front. As expected, the CH4 didn't really wet the ski very well at all and, when I peeled off the hockey tape, some large chunks went with it. I decided to be intentionally sloppy; some graphite got into the CH4 but that's all to the good (I won't have to test LGF4).

THen I taped a thermometer probe to the ski (using black tape, it was handy) and set them outside. Well, within 20 minutes the readout went from 76F to 107F so I took the black tape off and put the sensor back on with reflective HVAC tape.

112F by the time I left the house. The Toko Graphite M was already glistening wet and took fingerprints readily.

Pics to follow. Unless the thermometer goes kapouf.
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex
Well, I racked my brains over whether this could have any practical application whatsoever.

THen I taped a thermometer probe to the ski (using black tape, it was handy) and set them outside. Well, within 20 minutes the readout went from 76F to 107F so I took the black tape off and put the sensor back on with reflective HVAC tape.

112F by the time I left the house. The Toko Graphite M was already glistening wet and took fingerprints readily.

Pics to follow. Unless the thermometer goes kapouf.
Use some caution when doing this. Many (many) years ago I forgot about a couple pair of Dynamic VR17's with Look bindings strung over the rafters in my attic for the summer. (Binding side down.) I ended up with about 6+ inches of camber in both pair!: Oh, the lengths to which I'll go to get new skis.
post #14 of 20
While I do see how this could be effective for wax absorption, it can't be any more efficient that just giving your skis a good hot wax with an iron. Heat is heat. And I do recall some discussion a few years ago over whether or not UV light could damage your bottoms (some racers were turning bases up to the sun as they prepared at the start).

Why take the chance on screwing up your skis with either the UV light or by altering the construction in some way by overheating? Just doesn't seem worth the bother.
post #15 of 20
Heat is heat, true.

I do not expect to iron miniskis/Snowblades for hours on end though, and if this DOES work for hard waxes like CH4, it would be an interesting tool for a wax that doesn't really behave well with the iron.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Toko Alpine Tech Manual
But the two factors that effect wax
penetration most are heat and time. Time refers to how long the wax is on the base
before it is scraped. Heat refers to the temperature of the wax, and the base material.
Increasing the heat and, or the time will increase the penetration of wax into the base.
Increasing the heat will help wax penetration up to a point; once the melting point of the
base material is reached (around 150 C) the base can be severely damaged. For this
reason a wax specific iron is critical to maintaining a safe working temperature. The
duration of time the wax is left on the base increases wax penetration also. A ski should
be left to cool for at least an hour before scraping. Because wax adhesion can increase
over time, leaving the wax on as long as possible is important. It is for this reason that
storage waxing is so important, not only over the summer but between skiing. These two
factors can also work simultaneously when the ski is cooling, the slower the ski cools the
better the end result. For this reason it is unwise to put hot skis outside to cool. If you
are in a hurry let the skis cool inside as long as possible before placing them out in the
cold. The research done by Toko R&D in this area has lead to the deve lopment of the
Thermo Bag. The Thermo Bag technology allows the skis to remain at an elevated
temperature for any length of time; it also can let the skis cool extremely slowly. The
Thermo Bag can provide a significant increase in wax absorption in a relatively short
time, so it is a fantastic tool for preparing new or newly ground skis.
Page 11.


UV, schmuV. It's summer in Md not winter in CO. I might drip some wax onto photogrey lenses just to see how effective masking/absorption is though.
post #16 of 20
I once metal scraped a pair of skis which had been left in the sun all summer. They were the slowest skis on earth. The first layer of ptex was brittle and discolored. Deeper scrapings were flexible and looked new. After waxing they recovered all their old speed.
post #17 of 20
I did something along these lines this spring at mid way on a hike (from my TR, 5/5):



DOH! I neglected to mention my on-the-hill solar hotwaxing. When I stopped for rest and lunch at the A-frame, I looked at my bases and felt concer that they wouldn't slide well. I happened to have some wax in my backpack from last summer's trip to Mt. Hood. I rubbed on some Swix glidewax (all temp blue stuff) and turned my bases toward the sun, and left them for twenty minutes or more while I ate some lunch, and took some pics. Then I corked them. They slid like a bananna peel in a silent movie.

post #18 of 20

Results.

Well, they spent 9 hours in the sun yesterday.

Maximum temperature reached was 134 F.

Hertel and CH4 tracks did not seep or flow past their tape lines, irrespective of the quantity dripped at any point on the line.

(the tape-trimmed edge of large blobs was perfectly in line with the tape-trimmed edge of small ones)

The graphite-added CH4 did not flow any more than the clear stuff.

The Toko graphite track was harder to quantify, the tape lines were still visible in the black material, however there was considerable flow and seep past those of clear wax. In other words, the additives stayed put where the iron dripped them, and the clear low-melt-point wax flowed past the tape lines.

And stopped. It did not wet the base of the ski, in spite of there being more than sufficient wax to do so with iron application.

With a respectful tip of the hat to NE1 and the doubters above, I conclude that this method is highly unlikely to be useful to me, and I don't find further experiment time is remotely justified.

Should others feel the urge to continue, I suggest that any improved lubricity effects are due to the fraction of the applied wax with lowest melting point.

For the sake of comparing oranges to oranges, the results of ironed or corked application of just said fraction should be compared to results of solar application.
post #19 of 20
Anyone try putting the skis up in an attic storage area? It would be out of the direct sun light but would be just like a hot box in temperature on some days (depending on where you live).
post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by RShea
Anyone try putting the skis up in an attic storage area? It would be out of the direct sun light but would be just like a hot box in temperature on some days (depending on where you live).
Yeh, see earlier post. Weight of the bindings pulled a huge amount of new camber into the skiis. They had lots of "spring" but were toast and had to be replaced. Of course they were up there all summer.

For reference, summer attic temps can easily reach or exceed 150/160F.
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