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Summer Training

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
What do you do over the summer months to improve your skiing? This could include exercise programs, diets, activities, etc...
post #2 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamesgig
What do you do over the summer months to improve your skiing? This could include exercise programs, diets, activities, etc...
I go skiing.

Actually, my primary summer exercise involves hiking in the mountains. It's wonderful exercise, helps keep my lungs acclimatized to higher altitudes, and allows me to go scout out new backcountry skiing opportunities.

That's about it.
post #3 of 27
I spend hours and hours scouring EpicSki forums hoping to find the elixir that will magically transform my skiing. Since I have yet to find that I also bike, hike, stretch and work out with light weights or just body weight (I have lots of that) while standing on a balance board. I gradually ramp that up in the fall and add ice skating to the mix.

And ski videos, lots and lots of ski videos.
post #4 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters
I go skiing.

Actually, my primary summer exercise involves hiking in the mountains. It's wonderful exercise, helps keep my lungs acclimatized to higher altitudes, and allows me to go scout out new backcountry skiing opportunities.

That's about it.
Er, um, ditto. Though there's scant snow to hike to in these parts these days. I guess I'll have to fix my mountain bike and start riding to work every day.

I have sort of planned on doing some hiking around my local ski area with a bow saw in my back pack to prune some pesky low dead limbs and maybe remove some small standing dead trees in a burn.
post #5 of 27
I tend to put on weight over the winter because I'm not getting a lot of aerobic exersize. Also, I travel more in the winter, I'm constantly on the road, and it's harder to eat right. Therefore, in the summer I watch my diet and do a lot of biking, both road and mtn. This helps keep the weight off and also builds a lot of endurance for skiing. I also work out regularly with weights. I have a modest gym set up in my basement, and this winter I invested in a Total Gym. Turned out to be the best money I've spent in a long time. Great machine for not only strength training, but also adds a great range of motion and stretching the your routine, something that free weights don't give you. Also, I've noticed that alot of my nagging little injuries have gone away since I started using it, things that I think the free weights where constantly aggrevating. For the same reason, I stay away from the high impact activities such as jogging. Too much wear and tear on the old joints.
post #6 of 27
25 miles a week jogging on a bike trail . Do it because I'll be a year older next year, and just staying even is kidding yourself. Don't want to huff and puff too much when I am fortunate enough to get to ski out west. Have a new dog this year to jog with and she's ready to go every morning so I have some incentive. Lift weights in the basement when I get back for about 20 minutes.
post #7 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict
...

I have sort of planned on doing some hiking around my local ski area with a bow saw in my back pack to prune some pesky low dead limbs and maybe remove some small standing dead trees in a burn.
don't most ski areas consider that a no, no?

so, is it a folding bow saw?
post #8 of 27
30 to 45 minutes everyday on my Lifefitness Elliptical and dumbells 3x per week. Closer to ski season, I'll introduce some plyometrics as well.

I am considering a personal trainer, around middle/end of October since I won't ski till 2nd week of Dec, in order to increase flexibility and balance.

Anyone done the personal training deal to get ready for skiing? Or do specific excersises geared towards my goal?
post #9 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by icanseeformiles(andmiles)

don't most ski areas consider that a no, no?
The head of the trail crew at my ski area told me he has a "don't ask, don't tell" policy. That's with regard to the brush and small trees growing up in a couple of my favorite spots.

VA, you do want to be pretty careful about it. If the area you're "improving" is within the National Forest, very bad things can occur if you're caught doing unpermitted cutting. People have been subject to heavy fines and threatened jail time.

This actually brings up a pet peeve of mine...

Here at Jackson Hole (this is going on at Snowbird as well), there are a number of places on the Hobacks as well as the Lower Faces that are becoming seriously overgrown with brush. These are areas that were clear of brush thirty years ago.

What's happening is that before the ski area was here, natural climax avalanches used to run down these areas every so many years. These would peel out all the little trees and brush and leave behind a nice, smooth avalanche path.

Since the ski area opened and the ski patrol has been doing active snow control on those slopes (and skier-packed conditions prevail), we no longer get the occasional big ripper avalanche through those spots. As a result, all the little brushy trees and bushes - that used to get mowed off periodically - are now growing unimpeded. That's making it impossible to ski some of the places that I used to in the 70's and 80's.

The Forest Service understands that this development isn't exactly "natural", but the ski corp either can't afford to pay for trail crews to go up and hack all that stuff down or just doesn't want to spend the money. Either way, each year the skiable lines get progressively choked out.

That's why I occasionally go up there with loppers and a bow saw and "improve" on Mother Nature a little bit.
post #10 of 27

tree trimming

what if everybody did that???????? we would have better skiing. by the way, what is the mod squad?
post #11 of 27
Quote:
what is the mod squad?
Mod Squad=Moderator
post #12 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters
The head of the trail crew at my ski area told me he has a "don't ask, don't tell" policy. That's with regard to the brush and small trees growing up in a couple of my favorite spots.

VA, you do want to be pretty careful about it. If the area you're "improving" is within the National Forest, very bad things can occur if you're caught doing unpermitted cutting. People have been subject to heavy fines and threatened jail time.

This actually brings up a pet peeve of mine...

Here at Jackson Hole (this is going on at Snowbird as well), there are a number of places on the Hobacks as well as the Lower Faces that are becoming seriously overgrown with brush. These are areas that were clear of brush thirty years ago.

What's happening is that before the ski area was here, natural climax avalanches used to run down these areas every so many years. These would peel out all the little trees and brush and leave behind a nice, smooth avalanche path.

Since the ski area opened and the ski patrol has been doing active snow control on those slopes (and skier-packed conditions prevail), we no longer get the occasional big ripper avalanche through those spots. As a result, all the little brushy trees and bushes - that used to get mowed off periodically - are now growing unimpeded. That's making it impossible to ski some of the places that I used to in the 70's and 80's.

The Forest Service understands that this development isn't exactly "natural", but the ski corp either can't afford to pay for trail crews to go up and hack all that stuff down or just doesn't want to spend the money. Either way, each year the skiable lines get progressively choked out.

That's why I occasionally go up there with loppers and a bow saw and "improve" on Mother Nature a little bit.
Oh I'll be careful, apparently a couple who ski every day up there, decided to create thier own OB runs and brought a chainsaw. : Though they did get caught, and got in some degree of trouble with the FS, they were back on the slopes again the next season.

Some of the places I'm thinking about improving are quite out of the way of the mountain biking trails and areas otherwise accessible to vehicular traffic. I don't plan any major alterations, just removing some low branches in some of the prime tree skiing areas where I've had to duck more than I like (being 6'4", I'm a bit vertically challenged by low branches), and opening some lines where shrub maples have gotten out of control while the maintenance efforts have been focused on widening the road.

Oh and icanseeformiles, my pack can easily conceal even a 30" bowsaw in my pack, so I'll be well under the radar. I know one guy who's gone up there with a rechargable saws-all, so I'm actually pretty low key in my plans.
post #13 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by migibs
30 to 45 minutes everyday on my Lifefitness Elliptical and dumbells 3x per week. Closer to ski season, I'll introduce some plyometrics as well.

I am considering a personal trainer, around middle/end of October since I won't ski till 2nd week of Dec, in order to increase flexibility and balance.

Anyone done the personal training deal to get ready for skiing? Or do specific excersises geared towards my goal?
Closest thing I did a few times was to do some of the routines in the ski magazines. Most of the stuff was pretty standard, simple. Get one of those halfball things and do some balanced minisquats for instance. Same thing with crunches on the ball and side crunches. The gym I belong to had a routine that used this stuff. If I can find it I'll post it here.

I was wondering about that $1000 ski similator thing out of PC Utah if anyone has used it and what were the results.

It's so hard to really simulate what you have to do on a slope with the given conditions etc. I'd rather just ski down under or something during the summer!
post #14 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by ct55
I was wondering about that $1000 ski similator thing out of PC Utah if anyone has used it and what were the results.
I considered buying that about 3 years ago, but my wife took issue with the cost . But because I inquired they send me fliers about new products etc. I believe until mid August they have deals on last years models starting at like $700. www.skiersedge.com is the site.
post #15 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamesgig
What do you do over the summer months to improve your skiing? This could include exercise programs, diets, activities, etc...
I like to take my land rider out for a long spin up hills. The road bikers get so surly when I pass them it's funny. What do you do, James ,to keep yourself in top shape?
post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamesgig
What do you do over the summer months to improve your skiing? This could include exercise programs, diets, activities, etc...
For about 3 months I've been doing the 'Workout of the Day' from "Crossfit.com".
They really challange you. Most workouts are timed ,so there is no slacking. They push you well beyond the comfort zone.
Of coarse other people at the gym will look at you like you have 2 heads but oh well.
post #17 of 27
Lot's of cycling for me as usual.
And lot's of turns on the Skier's Edge Big Mountain S4/ Slope Simulator.

And high altitude hikes every few weeks.
post #18 of 27
post #19 of 27
Thread Starter 
I mostly swim. Since I have a pool and no way to get to a gym, it is an easy way to stay fit. On the average day I swim about 3/4-1 1/4 miles. I also skate (inline and ice), but this is more in the spring and fall because of heat and summer vacations. When it is not too hot, I play tennis.
post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by loboskis
For about 3 months I've been doing the 'Workout of the Day' from "Crossfit.com".
They really challange you. Most workouts are timed ,so there is no slacking. They push you well beyond the comfort zone.
Of coarse other people at the gym will look at you like you have 2 heads but oh well.
Very interesting site. Thanks for sharing , Lobo
post #21 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict
Oh and icanseeformiles, my pack can easily conceal even a 30" bowsaw in my pack, so I'll be well under the radar. I know one guy who's gone up there with a rechargable saws-all, so I'm actually pretty low key in my plans.
Yup, that's my tool of choice. Bowsaw and an 18volt Dewalt sawsall with 4 batteries. Last time the 4th battery died about 100 vert feet from the crossover trail. took a couple of years to get the perspective though. The first few trips, I didn't go wide enough or high enough.:
post #22 of 27
post #23 of 27

Fitness Routine

Actually the best thing that I have found for ski fitness and getting prepared for the upcoming season is a link I found on the Mount Hotham website. It has been invaluable, trust me!
post #24 of 27
post #25 of 27
I try to keep fit during all periods of the year - I don't have a regime during summer to prepare me for winter - I have pretty much the same regime all year round, and I vary up the exercises every 2 or 3 months to prevent boredom.

Pretty much it's 30-60 minutes of cardio , 4 times a week - either through running, cycling, hiking, or swimming. I also build in 60 minutes of weight/resistance training 4-5 times a week - I find resistance training if done with little break between exercises (supersetting) can be better than cardio in working up a sweat. And good for conditioning the muscles too.

If you're looking for specific exercises to help condition your body for winter, I'd focus on resistance training around the legs and core (but don't ignore your upper body in the process! - strong legs are useless without a strong torso) and I'd also build in some balancing exercises into your routine as well - a swiss ball is excellent for this. There are many variations of balancing exercises utilising the swiss ball - all easily found online.
post #26 of 27
I've been doing the Body For Life program for 7 weeks now, 5 more to go. I then plan on using FitSkiing (the book.)

Both involve 3 days of cardio and 3 days of weight training, combined with a 5-6 meal a day fairly high protein diet.
post #27 of 27
I do the same as everyone else. Hike, bike, walk the dog, meditate to thoughts of waist deep powder, and do a bit of weight lifting. I'll do some track work later in the fall and when the snow is on the mountain. Jogging doesn't interest me but a few 400-800 meter work outs at high intensity is always good. Follow that with some plyometrics and some core body work, i.e. sit ups, crunches, hanging leg raises, and reverse crunches.
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