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Cutting (with a saw) straight skis--help

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
I am registered to participate in a ski jumping clinic in September at Lake Placid Olympic park. (wow--can't wait) The sign-up info advises me to bring the "shortest, straightest" skis I can find.


I have a pair of Rossi 175 that are dead straight. Can I cut them to say 155 and then mount some "new" P14 Look bindings on them.

Assuming I can cut them--Which I am sure I can do safely.

1) what negatives are there?

2) any hints on mounting?

Don't think I am really looking for "performance" from the ski---I guess I just need somehthing to get me going fast and straight enough to fly off the jump. The most important part--in my mind-- would be binding release--thus my desire to use a newer binding than the Marker 1970ish one that is on the ski now.

Has anyone jumped into a pool before with skis. Is binding release that important? I have watched and participated in pond skimming--there it seemed to be important. I am guessing I dont care if my skis come off when I land in the water..I just dont want them 1) staying on if they are supposed to come off, or 2) comming off too easily and hitting me in the face/body as I sink into the pool.

Comments welcome.
post #2 of 27
I wouldn't cut them.
post #3 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by GregGaspar
I am registered to participate in a ski jumping clinic in September at Lake Placid Olympic park. (wow--can't wait) The sign-up info advises me to bring the "shortest, straightest" skis I can find.


I have a pair of Rossi 175 that are dead straight. Can I cut them to say 155 and then mount some "new" P14 Look bindings on them.

Assuming I can cut them--Which I am sure I can do safely.

1) what negatives are there?

2) any hints on mounting?

Don't think I am really looking for "performance" from the ski---I guess I just need somehthing to get me going fast and straight enough to fly off the jump. The most important part--in my mind-- would be binding release--thus my desire to use a newer binding than the Marker 1970ish one that is on the ski now.

Has anyone jumped into a pool before with skis. Is binding release that important? I have watched and participated in pond skimming--there it seemed to be important. I am guessing I dont care if my skis come off when I land in the water..I just dont want them 1) staying on if they are supposed to come off, or 2) comming off too easily and hitting me in the face/body as I sink into the pool.

Comments welcome.
Just buy a suitable pair on eBay for pennies. I would not cut a ski and then use it for any activity.

Michael
post #4 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by GregGaspar
Is binding release that important?
Actually, you don't want them to come off at all. I would not cut them, just max out the binding.
post #5 of 27
explain 'ski jumping clinic' and why not freeheel bindings.
post #6 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex
explain 'ski jumping clinic' and why not freeheel bindings.
I think he means he is going to be doing freestyle aerials, not ski jumping.
post #7 of 27
I agree. I wouldn't cut them. For one thing, they will completely delaminate at the tail. For another thing, you won't be able to move the binding to a proper position because there is only a limited area in which you can safley mount the binding due to a)thickness of the ski to take a screw, and b) a sheet of metal under the topskin to receive the screws.

You are much better off going to ebay or an early season ski swap and getting a pair of short, straight skis for $5. Better yet, just go to the gear (WTB, WTS and Free Stuff) section of Epic, and ask for an old pair of short skis. I'd bet there are a lot of people here with old equipment they'd be willing to give you for the price of shipping. I have an old pair of my wife's Olin's, but they are 170s.

Another option would be to visit your local ski shops and ask if they have anything that might fit your needs that they can give away or sell cheap. I bet they get lots of abandoned skis, although they may end up throwing them in the dumpster.
post #8 of 27
I've a pair of Rossis, 160cmish, balance point conveniently marked, he's welcome to for low shipping if I can figger out how to carry them on the bike.
post #9 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex
explain 'ski jumping clinic' and why not freeheel bindings.
Lake placid has a warm weather freestyle jumping ramp that has a swimming pool as the landing point. I wish I was invited!

Michael
post #10 of 27
Thread Starter 
Excellent info--I am so glad I posted and thank the creators of this forum!

1) never thought of ebay. Duh.
2) I bet my mountain would lend me a pair of rentals--they are not that shaped.
3) never thought of delam..
4) if the above does not cut it, I will check the swap or take you up on the 160s...15 cm is a big deal in the air. If I have my way, I want 150s--anthing shorter may decrease my speed--sliding on plastic cannot be fast, though the run up is steep and there is no room for speed checks. (maybe I want to go slower---YIKES)
5) can someone elaborate on why we want the skis to stay on---even in bad crashes?---Not sure how high we will get, but water is hard at speed--but then they might have those surface breaking bubbles. Ahhh.
6) SKI or SKIING has an article "do something else this summer" It discussed anyone can take this plunge for $10.00 a shot. I, however, joined a PSIA clinic where we do it for 2 days--starting on a trampoline.
post #11 of 27
Greg,

I'm pretty sure they have a bubble machine to lessen the impact. Otherwise, hitting the water on flat skis would be enough to cause physical harm to you.

You want the skis to release normally, but they will probably stay on. I don't see that you could generate enough twisting force to get the toe to release. I would guess that if they release, you'll need to dive to the bottom of a 20'(?) pool with ski boots on and bubbles coming up, to retreive the ski(s). I don't think that would be easy. If the heel releases on impact, and you go in, you would probably take a ski tip to the face. My guess is you don't want that to happen either.
post #12 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH
Greg,

I'm pretty sure they have a bubble machine to lessen the impact. Otherwise, hitting the water on flat skis would be enough to cause physical harm to you.

You want the skis to release normally, but they will probably stay on. I don't see that you could generate enough twisting force to get the toe to release. I would guess that if they release, you'll need to dive to the bottom of a 20'(?) pool with ski boots on and bubbles coming up, to retreive the ski(s). I don't think that would be easy. If the heel releases on impact, and you go in, you would probably take a ski tip to the face. My guess is you don't want that to happen either.
Note to self: Immediately cease construction of ramp into friends pool
post #13 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by madmanmlh
Note to self: Immediately cease construction of ramp into friends pool
It works best if you do it off a roof into an above-ground pool that has those flimsy tin sides, so it comes apart when you impact the water. Send film to America's Funniest Home Videos.

Oh, and coming from the guy who's about to get an MRI on his knee..... yeah! Land with straight legs, and you're pretty much guaranteed to instantly explode both ACLs, while possibly driving your face into your knees and god only knows what you'd do to your back!
post #14 of 27
Maybe i should place a bed of nails on a raft right in the LZ to break the fall

jk

i may have lost my mind years ago, but all im doing now is working out and getting in shape. I only jump off things when im 110% sure of everything (knees, skis, rocks, snow ect)

o yeah, and with my "construction" skills, the thing would collapse before i ever got down the ramp. Probly killing me in some slow, inhumane fashion

disclaimer* im not actually building anything

sorry, im done, no more thread hijacking
post #15 of 27
Thread Starter 
Now---I start to worry......
Thanks everyone!!!
post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by GregGaspar
I am registered to participate in a ski jumping clinic in September at Lake Placid Olympic park. (wow--can't wait) The sign-up info advises me to bring the "shortest, straightest" skis I can find.


I have a pair of Rossi 175 that are dead straight. Can I cut them to say 155 and then mount some "new" P14 Look bindings on them.

Assuming I can cut them--Which I am sure I can do safely.

1) what negatives are there?

2) any hints on mounting?

Don't think I am really looking for "performance" from the ski---I guess I just need somehthing to get me going fast and straight enough to fly off the jump. The most important part--in my mind-- would be binding release--thus my desire to use a newer binding than the Marker 1970ish one that is on the ski now.

Has anyone jumped into a pool before with skis. Is binding release that important? I have watched and participated in pond skimming--there it seemed to be important. I am guessing I dont care if my skis come off when I land in the water..I just dont want them 1) staying on if they are supposed to come off, or 2) comming off too easily and hitting me in the face/body as I sink into the pool.

Comments welcome.
Holy s::t Greg . Like others say , get some short fatties on e-bay or a local outlet like Play it Again Sports or something similar that sells used gear. Cutting them would be hazardous to your well being:::. Have fun at the clinic whatever you decide . That sounds like fun
post #17 of 27

Time for more polls

Boots:

a) drill them out for drainage
a1) stock liner
a2) neoprene sock liner

b) really, really tight gaiters and hope

Bindings

a) plastic toepiece
a1) pull up heel release
a2) push down heel release

b) metal toepiece

And, last but not least,

How big a fishing float on the powder leash?
post #18 of 27

Who needs skis?

Or even boots? Personally, I'd go with a pair of roller blades, a Superman Cape, and one of those Devo Energy Domes...
post #19 of 27
Forget that, Goode Ramp are what you need. Designed specificly to work on ramps and in the water.
post #20 of 27
You could try looking at a Thrift Store or Salvation Army Store. People donate some pretty good stuff. A buddy of mine picked up a pair of late 90's Fischers for 75 cents. They were having a 75% off sale.
post #21 of 27
Thread Starter 
I plan on typing a whole thing on this clinic---but for anyone searching...there is no need for "short straight skis" if you can ski. I went on 160 B1s---no worries. I fully believe I wouldhave been just fine on my OmniCarve Dynastars...If you can run a flat ski---it does not matter what the ski is....my very little experience talking here.


I think DIN is more important that ski shape. I had a DIN of 9 and landed very well (most of the time) never lost a ski. I usually ski a 7 DIN, but my calculation is 8. My bindings maxed out at 9. Next year I may take my newer skis with more shape, and a DIN of 14. Those that had to dive, were not happy.

While on this subject--forward presure (meaning the back binding as tight as it can get) is highly suggested. I was able to move my rear binding up 2 clicks from where my ski tech had it normally. I never thought there was that much play--guess I was wrong.
post #22 of 27
Pics? Video? Witnesses? Police Report?
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by GregGaspar View Post
I plan on typing a whole thing on this clinic---but for anyone searching...there is no need for "short straight skis" if you can ski. I went on 160 B1s---no worries. I fully believe I wouldhave been just fine on my OmniCarve Dynastars...If you can run a flat ski---it does not matter what the ski is....my very little experience talking here.
Sweet. I never saw the original thread, or I wouldn't mentioned something. Which size jumps did you get up to? I spent a few days hitting the ramps during a camp at Whistler a few summers back. We just clicked into whatever skis happened to be laying around and maxed out the bindings. And yeah, swimming to the bottom of a pool in ski boots isn't very fun...
post #24 of 27
I went to a ski jumping demo at the Utah Olympic Sport Park this summer, man it looked like fun. And, yes, they had a bubble machine at the bottom of the pool. (Unfortunately, no Lawrence Welk-style bubble machines to add atmosphere though).

At the Olympic Sport park the $10 trial jump is off a little roller into the pool. Not much to do on it except go up, and down. Maybe a 360.
post #25 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by GregGaspar View Post
While on this subject--forward presure (meaning the back binding as tight as it can get) is highly suggested. I was able to move my rear binding up 2 clicks from where my ski tech had it normally. I never thought there was that much play--guess I was wrong.
That play is why we never noticed the 'flat spots' in the skis back in 1980.

I would really love to see a release test done on these. How well does binding lube stand up to chlorine?
post #26 of 27
Very cool Greg. Looking forward to the full report.

However, I wouldn't recommend cranking the forward pressure. Too much will make you blow out of the toe binding (pre release). And if you get into trying to spin hard off a ramp, you might just spin right out of the ski(s).
post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by kris247 View Post
I went to a ski jumping demo at the Utah Olympic Sport Park this summer, man it looked like fun. And, yes, they had a bubble machine at the bottom of the pool. (Unfortunately, no Lawrence Welk-style bubble machines to add atmosphere though).

At the Olympic Sport park the $10 trial jump is off a little roller into the pool. Not much to do on it except go up, and down. Maybe a 360.
Did they call it ski jumping, aerials, or something else? To me, real ski jumping is the free-heeled soaring variety - everything else is done off a kicker, not a ski jump.

Real ski jumping is one of the most spectacular sports there is.
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