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Road bike weight

post #1 of 34
Thread Starter 
What is a good road bike weight?

If you are looking to shed weight on a road bike, where is a good place to look?

Over the years I've slowly replaced failing parts on my bike and I'm currently at 20lbs with light's and battery. Should I be satisfied or should I be looking for more weight savings..

I'm a recreational rider, more for fitness and keeping my legs and knees in shape. Most of my rides are short hop rides are 7-10 miles around the city.

1996 ish Specialized M2 Team Road Sworks frame.
Shimano 3/9 Dura-ace Drive train and STI shifters.
Easton EC-90SL Fork. EC 90 OC handle bars
Shimano 105 hubs and Mavic 04CD rims
Shimano 105 brakes.
Ritchey Pro OC stem
Cane Creek S-pro head set.
Night Rider II lighting system (tail and front)
Stock Specialized seat post and Terry seat. (probably needs to go. It's probably pretty heavy)


The rims are starting to get out of true and don't have the machined surfaces for braking so I'm thinking about replacing them.

Currently on Contenintal GP3000's and will probably move to Hutchinson carbon comps when they finally give up unless I can get a pair of gp4000's cheap.

DC
post #2 of 34
Spinning weight is always the best to loose. If you are looking to replace the rim going lighter can be good if the strength is maintained where it needs to be. OTOH aerodynamics are important in the rim and usually run counter to the light weight.

Not sure but assume the Easton fork in aluminum. Carbon fork can save weight and offer a much more dampened ride.

Under 20 lbs is already a pretty light weight for a recreational bike especially if you including lights and batteries in that.
post #3 of 34
Thread Starter 
Easton fork is Carbon 1" threadless. Went that way for comfort and loving it.

Thanks L7
post #4 of 34

Plenty light already.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan
What is a good road bike weight?

If you are looking to shed weight on a road bike, where is a good place to look?

Over the years I've slowly replaced failing parts on my bike and I'm currently at 20lbs with light's and battery. Should I be satisfied or should I be looking for more weight savings..
20lbs with lights and batteries? That's like a 19lb bike! I think the pros ride bikes in the 16lb range.

Ever try helium in the tires and frame?
post #5 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan
1996 ish Specialized M2 Team Road Sworks frame.
Dang. I'm on the '96 Specialized M2 Road Comp. Titanium color.
post #6 of 34
I think I'd look for wheels. You have a very fine bike with some superb componants but those 105 hubs and 04CD rims aren't doing your bike justice.
post #7 of 34
I'm with SNPete on this, why lighter?
post #8 of 34
Dchan,

There are two areas to look at: rotating weight and static weight. The current carbon frames on the TdeF are in the range of 900gr. The total bike weight is around 14.9 pounds. The frames that are available for consumer use are in the 1-1.5 kg. I have a custom magnesium fro Zinn and it weighs 1.1. Frame replacement is not cheap. Top of the line Look is $3000, with forks.

Wheels are the first place I would look. I just got a pair of Rolf Elans. Weight is 1295gr as compared to the Mavic Krysirium SL I had at 1890gr. Easton also makes a light wheel somewhere around 1350gr. You will notice a big difference in how your bike climbs

Saddles. Depend on how tough your butt is. Specialized makes a very light one called the Toupe. I weighs 150gr as compared to most at 370-300gr. I had one but to return it. Too stiff. You can also reduce weight with a carbon seatpost. I have FSA and it is quite light and easy to adjust.

Tires. They need to be flat-resistant. I had tubulars and what a pain! Lighter tires are not always the answer. I have Vredestein Fortessa Tri-comp for two years without a flat. I love not having to change flats!

I would suggest a lighht system that you wear, rather than mount on the bike. They are lighter and you don't have lug them around in daylight.

Hope I have been of help...
Rick H
post #9 of 34
Dchan,

I forgot to mention, a good weight is in the 16-18 pound range. Mine is 16.9 and it climbs quite well.

Rick H
post #10 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jstraw
I think I'd look for wheels. You have a very fine bike with some superb componants but those 105 hubs and 04CD rims aren't doing your bike justice.
I know.. I purchased the bike used and upgraded as I went along.

Broken teeth on the gears, hmmm.. ok replace..

Poor shifting (bent derailer) hmmm replace..

Tired of reaching down to the down tubes to shift... Hmmm. Hey, ON SALE.. Ooooh. Combo deal.. BB, Crank, Front Derailer, STI and cables 399.00.. Twist my arm!

Cracked fork. (Got "car doored" by an idiot on a cell phone. Lucky nothing else including myself was damaged) New fork,.. Hmm on sale combo, Carbon fork, threadless head set, and handlebars.

Ebay for the riser/stem..

Yada yada yadah..
post #11 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryan
Dang. I'm on the '96 Specialized M2 Road Comp. Titanium color.
I understand that's a pretty sweet ride as well.

Mine's the Red team S-works (I think it was the one just above the Ti color bike) From what I have researched, at the time this bike was not available assembled. You had to purchase a Frame and have a shop build the bike or build it your self.

Could be wrong.
post #12 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex
I'm with SNPete on this, why lighter?
Ever live in a city built on a hill?

Try riding a heavy bike around San Francisco...

I'm always looking for new routes to avoid the steep hills.

DC
post #13 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jstraw
I think I'd look for wheels. You have a very fine bike with some superb componants but those 105 hubs and 04CD rims aren't doing your bike justice.
Yeah leaning that way..

Now all I need are some more service calls.
post #14 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick H
Dchan,

There are two areas to look at: rotating weight and static weight. The current carbon frames on the TdeF are in the range of 900gr. The total bike weight is around 14.9 pounds. The frames that are available for consumer use are in the 1-1.5 kg. I have a custom magnesium fro Zinn and it weighs 1.1. Frame replacement is not cheap. Top of the line Look is $3000, with forks.

Wheels are the first place I would look. I just got a pair of Rolf Elans. Weight is 1295gr as compared to the Mavic Krysirium SL I had at 1890gr. Easton also makes a light wheel somewhere around 1350gr. You will notice a big difference in how your bike climbs

Saddles. Depend on how tough your butt is. Specialized makes a very light one called the Toupe. I weighs 150gr as compared to most at 370-300gr. I had one but to return it. Too stiff. You can also reduce weight with a carbon seatpost. I have FSA and it is quite light and easy to adjust.

Tires. They need to be flat-resistant. I had tubulars and what a pain! Lighter tires are not always the answer. I have Vredestein Fortessa Tri-comp for two years without a flat. I love not having to change flats!

I would suggest a lighht system that you wear, rather than mount on the bike. They are lighter and you don't have lug them around in daylight.

Hope I have been of help...
Rick H
That helps a lot...

Gives me some ideas. I have not had a flat on these GP 3000 but they don't make them any more..

DC
post #15 of 34
That is pretty darn light. For a bike with a light on it yet!

Wheels are for sure the most important place to save weight, but be careful. The only broken bone I've ever had was a collarbone when a super light wheel caved in. My own stupid fault, bought it for TT, just had to try in a criterium. I'm just wondering if you commute on your bike or something.

Count me as a Vredestein fan too. The Conti's are tough, but those old ones (which were really tough!) don't roll that fast.
post #16 of 34
Where does the trade off, lightness for strenghth or lightness and flexability become a negativity instead of a desirable trait?

Some carbon bikes feel so bendy it seems like too much movement in the frames.

Some of you have very nice full carbon bikes . What do you think about that?

Carbon vs alu vs steel?
post #17 of 34
Thread Starter 
I like the quickness feel of Alu and can't afford the Carbon's that are as stiff as my current ride.

A lot depends on where you ride and what you like.. Since I have to climb hills where I ride.. That was my trade off..

DC
post #18 of 34
That EC90 is a badass fork

I'd recommend a new seatpost and saddle. That Toupe works well for me, but it is very stiff. A carbon seatpost is lighter, and it also has some shock-absorbing properties, a helpful thing on a bike with no carbon.

You might explore the Bontrager XXX Lite Clinchers, or a Ksyrium SL, something like that. I agree that the rims could use and upgrade.
post #19 of 34
I'd stick with the Open 4's (new ones if they're beat up and don't stay true any more). When I had Tom Kellogg build my Ti bike. he would've spec'd anything I wanted, but he recommended the OP's. It's still modern, light enough, bombproof when built properly with 32 DT spokes to a good hub like a Chorus, and if you break a spoke on a Ksyrium or some other exotic, bladed spoke wheel, how long do you have to wait around till your shop gets a replacement spoke? Don't know how big you are, but shaving grams on wheels can cause headaches in the long run. Yes, rotating weight does count a little more, but unlesss you're riding crits and accelerating out of corners every 20 seconds, once the wheel is up to speed it doesn't matter too much.
post #20 of 34
Thread Starter 
Maybe new hubs?
post #21 of 34
New hubs will be essential to getting many of the new rims out there. In fact give up the separate search and just look for new wheelset. Like ES says lighter rims can give you more acceleration and 'snap' which may really not matter to you and may give more risk of trashing a rim. A new wheelset may well find the balance between weight, acceleration, strength and aerodynamics for how you use it. Nothing is more important on any bike.
post #22 of 34
Better wheels and tires. Try and find em used on ebay or craigs list

http://www.cbike.com/mavic.htm#ES

Or, lose some weight. Might b cheaper
post #23 of 34
Thread Starter 
Price range for a decent set? I noticed anything under 1500g tend to be fairly expensive.

Any reviews on a good price/quality/weight balance.

I don't tend to be too hard on my wheels. I'm about 160lbs, don't go jumping off or climbing up curbs or stairs.

Needs to be 9sp Shimano compatible.

Anyone have a review on the Cane Creek Aerohead SGs?

DC
post #24 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by evansilver
if you break a spoke on a Ksyrium or some other exotic, bladed spoke wheel, how long do you have to wait around till your shop gets a replacement spoke?
Very true. It takes a good two weeks to order an exotic part like that through our service.
post #25 of 34
I don't know what your lighting system weighs, but that could be a place to cut tons of weight. Depending on your needs, going to an LED based system with Li-ion batteries could save a pound or two.
post #26 of 34
dchan, I don't ride on cane creek aerohead sg's but I do ride on can creek aerohead cronos. I haven't been disapointed with them. There are some great buys out there on discontinued cane creek wheels. I bought mine from greenfishsports.com
post #27 of 34

How's $520/set new? $900 for a crit set?

I've posted these before: Nimble FLY and SPIDER:
http://www.nimble.net/

BUT I think a serious look at your gearing is in order.

(Anyone have an online semi-logarithmic gear inch map utility handy?)
post #28 of 34
Just a note on Rolf wheelsets. I ordered on a Monday from my dealer in Boulder. They were shipped from Rolf that afternoon and arrived in Boulder on Wednesday. Reshipped and arrived at my home on Thursday and rode them on Friday. Spokes are probably the same shpping time. BTW the wheels are good to rider weight of 225. They have Rolf patented hubs and spoke and come in Camp or Shimano and can be interchanged at any time with a Rolf freewheel adapter. And they have other, less expensive models. But for climbing the hills of San Francisco, I recommend a climbing wheel of some sort. They will pay for themselves in the long run. This equipment is not a place to save money.

Also, for climbing I would look at a FSA triple crank and a Campy 13/29 cassette. The lowest cog that Shimano offers is a 27t. It makes a difference. I went from a FSA 34/50 to a FSA 30/37/53 and did it help! I also have a Campy 13/29. I live in rolling western slope hills of NW Colorado. Sort of like SF.

Rick H
post #29 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex

BUT I think a serious look at your gearing is in order.

(Anyone have an online semi-logarithmic gear inch map utility handy?)
53-38-30
and
27-11

I think I'm about as good as I'm going to get on gearing unless I switch brands. An expense I'm not willing to pay at this point.

Dura ace components here..

Crank is Dura-ace at 172.5
post #30 of 34
I'm not so sure all this talk of climbing wheels is the way to go for DChan. We are talking about an urban commuter bike aren't we? Don't they have potholes and trolley tracks and stuff like that in SF? I'm not so sure that an expensive and fragile wheelset is the way to go.
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