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Can adults use Jr skis if they are small people like me?!

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Hi,
I am a fairly novice skier, but love every second of it and cant wait for this season, my boyfriend is working a season this year so I will be going out a lot so want to buy some basic skis. I have always hired Head 'Big Easy' carver skis before and found them perfect, I am female and fairly small; 159 cm tall (5"3) and I weigh 50kg (110lbs), and so normally have skis that are about 140cm or 145cm, there seem to be a lot of jr skis this size and I was wondering if it would be ok if I bought these, bearing in mind I am only a novice skier and only want basic skis that will allow me ski recreationally with ease and do not want to spend too much money at the moment, would be really grateful of anyone has any advice or experience of this!
thanks very much

Hannah
post #2 of 16
Hannah,

Welcome. Can you get away with junior skis? Prolly, but for the same or not much more, you can find a mice mid line womans ski that you will get more out of. The only "quality" junior skis tend to be the high end race models which really wouldn't be what you want. I would stick to a K2 "First Luv" tyoe ski, that you could find as a clearance model, fairly inexpensive.
post #3 of 16
Yes.
post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys, whygimf, was that a yes to Phil's reply or a yes to getting away with jr skis?

H
post #5 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by hannahevincent
Thanks guys, whygimf, was that a yes to Phil's reply or a yes to getting away with jr skis?

H
Yes. :
post #6 of 16
post #7 of 16
I worked in a rental shop for a season and we used to give out "junior" skis to folks who were 5'3" and 110lbs. On busy weekends we didn't have enough skis for everyone coming through the shop, so we were practically forced to do it. We had a lot of Rossi Bandit Jr's in sizes from 135 - 150 or so. We actually had a lot of compliments on those skis and a lot of women really liked them.
post #8 of 16
A lighter more petite woman will benefit from a womans ski more than an agressive bigger/stronger lady. ( I really watched my words there ). It is not that a womans ski is just pink or teal. The mounting points and flex is different than a mans or junior ski.

Now...Boots. Boots are more important than skis. What do you have for boots and were they fitted properly?
post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
well I havent bought any yet, but I am looking at a pair of ladies ROSSIGNOL LIBERTY 3 boots
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by hannahevincent
well I havent bought any yet, but I am looking at a pair of ladies ROSSIGNOL LIBERTY 3 boots
I hope you have tried them on and walked around in them for a long time. Buying boots that fit properly takes a lot of time and effort. I'm not talking about shopping store-to-store, rather, trying on many boots to find the one that fits you properly before the shop starts tweaking them to really fit. Then spending an hour or two making the shop fit them right. Many people end up with boots that are too big for proper skiing because they were/are very comfortable due to being too large!
post #11 of 16

woman-to-woman

Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
It is not that a womans ski is just pink or teal. The mounting points and flex is different than a mans or junior ski.
Just a naive question - if so, which skis should female juniors choose?*g*

The story of different mounting points might have much shorter legs than female skiers in general. Although we understand that a lady's botty is an attractive research object to the skiing industry, one could easily negate the theory, that a mounting point brought in front of the ski more, could be the universial solution to keep all female skiers well balanced.

Hannah, if you get a nice pair of junior skis - like barrettscv says, no racing, no lost cost models but maybe a last season's model at a reduced price will be as fine as any woman ski for you. Most important for small and lightwight people's skis are a softer flex and a suitable lenghth.
nicola (160cm/49kg)
post #12 of 16
You need to give a lot more info, like overall fitness, likely number of days this year, prior experience with motion sports (ice skating, mtb, gymnastics, inline skating, etc.), and where you'll be skiing for specific good ski input. There are nice junior skis, but in general a shorter adult model with appropriate flex will work better for you and have the core last longer.

Wear thin socks when you try on boots. Thinner the better (and obviously, these should be the same socks you wear on th hill). The Libetry 3 is a three-buckle, entry-level boot I believe? If this is correct and you really plan to ski a lot, you'll likely be hating them and spending more money and time again soon to get better boots. Think about how much money you can spend simply on buying lunch and breakfast on the hill over the course of a 25 day season; take this money, spend it on good boots and a good bootfitter who you can go back to over the course of the season, and brownbag your food.
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by hannahevincent
Can adults use Jr skis if they are small people like me?!
Yes
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook
You need to give a lot more info, like overall fitness, likely number of days this year, prior experience with motion sports (ice skating, mtb, gymnastics, inline skating, etc.), and where you'll be skiing for specific good ski input.
Probably to give it to the sales person at the skishop as I think advice on which model to buy via web is less effective. A good alternative would be to hire certain models first and than buy.
post #14 of 16
Just to clear up a popular misunderstanding on “Lady Skis”. - About three years ago ski industry has picked up the common trend to touch upon the women audience. As ski building is less sophisticated than marketing wants to make consumers to believe, in my real opinion as a woman and ski developer I would like to say, that there can’t be gender specific parameters in ski building. We know combinations of parameters which give the preference to lightweight people – gender or age independent. So the “determinant woman” no more, no less is a light weighted person with less muscular power.

The last thing consumers need, is another category, which doesn’t say anything about the real attributes of a ski furthermore radius and length, like flex, torsion, contact area, recommended weight range etc. This only will increase anyhow existing biases –-> A lady doesn’t dare to buy a junior ski, a gentleman doesn’t dare to show off with lady skis, although he loves the pink florets design, an athletic woman doesn’t choose a racing model not to appeal as a virago …
post #15 of 16
Hi Hannah - For the record, you're not particularly small for a woman (about 40th percentile for height, 20th for weight). Keep in mind that weight and height can be deceptive; if you consider yourself athletic, and are fairly active all year long, you will have more muscle mass and need a little more ski than if you're sedentary, even at the same height and weight.

Agree with others that you'd be happier with a versatile intermediate ski than a junior. The middle range RX skis from Fischer make nice skis for lighter folks, as do Rossignols like the Z-5 or B-2W, and Volkls like the middle range Attiva models or the AC-2's.

Many of these are available in last season's version at very good prices on the web. Yes, places like Ski Trader and Al's Ski Barn are helpful, reliable, and can have great prices on a few of last year's models, but overall they aren't as much of a bargin as slopeside or sporting goods stores trying to get rid of last year's inventory. That's where Google comes in. Right now, for instance, Sierra Ski/Snowboard has a 50% sale, and the the reviews by SierraJim are very helpful. You can find even better prices on eBay, but it's more work.

Before you decide, though, you should think about much you plan to ski, and where. Most of us here would argue that you'd learn faster on a carver, but if you're out west, you might want to go more toward a fatter one.

Good luck!
post #16 of 16
Well, for a novice skier who's likely to change out the skis in a couple of years as she progresses, no matter which ones she buys, cost should be a big factor.

Despite what everyone has said, which is no doubt good advice, i used my son's outgrown Jr. Atomic ARC skis for a couple of years when i was a novice and they worked just fine. (comparable size to you).

So my humble advice is: if you have access to some cheap or free Jr. skis, save your money and spend it on the boots which can last you much longer and are, indeed, more important. then, as you get better, you can rent some women's skis and you'll be in a better position to determine which ones are for you.
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