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Prescription Ski Goggles

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
I need to do something about being able to see properly when I ski!

I normally wear my glasses under my goggles but they usually fog up so I end up skiing without them (which makes for some scary skiing in flat or dull light and screamer of headache at the end of the day). I got prescription sunglasses which are great, but only on bright / warmer days.

I've seen that some of the manufacturers have prescription goggles (such as Adidas who have a clip-in system) and I was wondering if anyone has experience with these goggles that they might be willing to share

Please note that contacts aren't an option - I just can't stick things in my eyes!

Cheers

Ken
post #2 of 28
I skied with my UVEX goggles over my eyeglasses, both optic/sunglasses and the usual eyeglasses – no fog. I took the UVEX goggles that are made to be over eyeglasses. Have you tried them?
post #3 of 28
post #4 of 28
Rudy Project have clip-ins for virtually all of their glasses and goggles. I really like their glasses, but haven't tried their goggles, yet.
post #5 of 28
Thread Starter 
thanks for the responses - I've also found that Smith do pair that even has a little fan in them (not sure how well the battery will work in -10 c however
post #6 of 28
I use Bolle goggles that have an Rx insert that I can put in any of the 3 pair of goggles I have. I also have Bolle sunglasses with an Rx insert. The sunglasses have 4 interchangable lenses, so that I can wear them in different conditions. The sunglasses are Bolle Parole and Vigilante (one is a larger frame, but they look the same). What's nice about these, is that, when your prescription changes, you can just get new lenses put in the inserts, and they are cheap because they don't have tint or anything else special about them. I got mine done at WallyWorld for about $40/pair, and they did a respectable job. I also had new Rx lenses put in my good Ray Ban sunglasses (mirror tint and polarized), and it cost almost $200.

But I'm getting Lasik in 2 days! ye ha!
post #7 of 28
I bought the Adidas clip in system on sale summer of '05 at my optomertrist shop. $50 for the goggles then prolly another $150 for the inserts and to grind the lenses. Not a cheap solution but it might be the best gear purchase I have ever made (well at least last year).

Even when I face plant this set up is hard to fog. Mine fit great and look pretty good too (if I do say so myself).
post #8 of 28
I posted to the Free stuff forum. I'll give away my Bolle Rx insert for the price of shipping. I'd also be willing to sell off the 2 pair of Bolle Chrono goggles that it fits into (clear/clear and red/red).
post #9 of 28
After battling with issues and solutions surrounding glasses i finally went to soft disposible contacts that i wear for skiing and biking. I was surprised to find out how easy and comfortable they've become. They aren't like the soft contacts i tried 20 years ago that needed "getting use to" and never seemed to fit propoerly. Just popped them in and forgot about them.

The other benefit to contacts is protection. I did a face plant last year while racing that would have been messy if i was wearing glasses.

Might be worth considering.
post #10 of 28
I am using Smith Knowledge Turbo OTG with their Ocular Docking System. I wear a helmet and initially had some problems with fogging. I found an anti fog substance suggested on this forum called Fog Tech. Bought a big box of it on the web.It is a wipe on substance that comes in individual packets. it works extremely well.

I also have Panoptx Scirrocco sunglsses w/ prescription photochromatic lenses and clip in/out eyecups that work extremely well. if you wear a helmet the sunglasses are not a good choice when it is cold out! Your forehead absolutely freezes. (take a 30 -40MPH wind at 20 -30 degrees and blow it directly on your forehead & you will see what I mean) so i reserve the glasses for for warmer days and also wear them daily with the eycups removed.

I can no longer wear soft contacts and have not been able to acclimate to hard gas permeable lenses!
post #11 of 28
Sounds like the Smith Turbo will be the way to go. Caution, if you wear a helmet, take it with you to assure that it will fit up as a system. There are some subtle differences with the strap as well as the arc (top) of the goggle mating with the arc (over your face), on the helmet.

Atomicman alluded to fog .... do you dress heavy and sweat a lot or are you carrying a lot of body sweat/vapor under your jacket that steams things up all over.
post #12 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki
Sounds like the Smith Turbo will be the way to go. Caution, if you wear a helmet, take it with you to assure that it will fit up as a system. There are some subtle differences with the strap as well as the arc (top) of the goggle mating with the arc (over your face), on the helmet.

Atomicman alluded to fog .... do you dress heavy and sweat a lot or are you carrying a lot of body sweat/vapor under your jacket that steams things up all over.
I dress lightly, but ski warm. the vapor is from the portion of my face & forehead directly behind the goggle lense. Additionally the Great Pacific NW is pretty damn damp!

Works fairly well while you are oving and the fan has a low setting thet you run on consistently and then turn it to high in the lift line or when you stop on the hill. Fog Tech has been a huge improvement in the fog management.

By the way the only part that fogs is the prescription lense in the docking system. this is the only part (albeit the most crucial part) that i treat with Fog Tech.
post #13 of 28
Thread Starter 
thanks everyone for the great suggestions - I've actually gone with the soft contacts (as uncannily predicted by Youngsman above!) - the disposable 1 day type which I can use skiing and running

Anyway with the assistance of a very patient and helpful optometrist and about 20 minutes to get the first set in (including about 5 dropped to the floor) and about 10 minutes to get them out they seem to work fine - as Youngsman points out they are a lot improved over those from a few years back.

I'm off to Perisher Blue (Australian resort) in a couple of weeks for 3 days slushing and rock dodg'n so I'll see how well they go !

Cheers & thanks
post #14 of 28
Great to hear!! Ssoft contacts were my choice until I had Galucoma surgery and can no longer wear them. They worked the best when I was skiing!
post #15 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aussie Ken
I need to do something about being able to see properly when I ski!

I normally wear my glasses under my goggles but they usually fog up so I end up skiing without them (which makes for some scary skiing in flat or dull light and screamer of headache at the end of the day). I got prescription sunglasses which are great, but only on bright / warmer days.

I've seen that some of the manufacturers have prescription goggles (such as Adidas who have a clip-in system) and I was wondering if anyone has experience with these goggles that they might be willing to share

Please note that contacts aren't an option - I just can't stick things in my eyes!

Cheers

Ken
Here's a very simple solution to your problem, put your googles on and then don't take them off, they won't fog. Take them off when you go inside or ride the gondola and thats it. I too can't wear contacts and just spent over 100 days skiing in the humid PNW.. I never had fogging problems. Prescription goggles will still fog if you take them off and put them on your forehead where they'll pick up moisture from your tuque, and then you're blind without them on or you have to carry your glasses in your pocket. Just get a pair of goggles that fit over your glasses (i use scott storm otg), and keep them on, you won't fog. If you fall, wipe them off inside and out, put them on, start moving, they'll clear up, and keep them on. Did I mention you have to keep them on? Thats really all there is to it.
post #16 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by quixotle
Here's a very simple solution to your problem, put your googles on and then don't take them off, they won't fog. Take them off when you go inside or ride the gondola and thats it. I too can't wear contacts and just spent over 100 days skiing in the humid PNW.. I never had fogging problems. Prescription goggles will still fog if you take them off and put them on your forehead where they'll pick up moisture from your tuque, and then you're blind without them on or you have to carry your glasses in your pocket. Just get a pair of goggles that fit over your glasses (i use scott storm otg), and keep them on, you won't fog. If you fall, wipe them off inside and out, put them on, start moving, they'll clear up, and keep them on. Did I mention you have to keep them on? Thats really all there is to it.
that is absolutly ridiculous!

It is not the goggles that fog it is the glasses or prescritpion insert. It has nothing to do with taking them on or off. It is simply a bulid up of moisture inside the goggle that bulids up on the insert of glasses hanging inside the goggle. I have not had goggle fogging problems in years. again it is the inserts and glasses that are a problem partially mostly due to fact that these parts have no permanaent antifog coating on them. the other factor is a helmet. this increase the heat in your facial are dramatically and this is where the excess moisture is coming from. The fan on the Smith Turbo is an exhaust fan. And thogh it is helpful, it can only suck out a limited amount of moisture. What it can't get rid of condenses on the your glasses or prescription insert.

I have founf Fog_Tech to be very effective if applied freshly on the glasses or inserts. I clean them off at lunch at apply a new fresh application.

Taking your googles on or off has no effect on the the glasses or inserts. In fact by lifting the bottom of my goggles off my face shortly after getting on the chair after a run and switching my fan to is very effective in "dehumidyfying" the air inside the goggle.

Trust me, I have spent hours and literally several hundred dollars working on a setup that is suitable.
post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman
that is absolutly ridiculous!

It is not the goggles that fog it is the glasses or prescritpion insert. It has nothing to do with taking them on or off. It is simply a bulid up of moisture inside the goggle that bulids up on the insert of glasses hanging inside the goggle. I have not had goggle fogging problems in years. again it is the inserts and glasses that are a problem partially mostly due to fact that these parts have no permanaent antifog coating on them. the other factor is a helmet. this increase the heat in your facial are dramatically and this is where the excess moisture is coming from. The fan on the Smith Turbo is an exhaust fan. And thogh it is helpful, it can only suck out a limited amount of moisture. What it can't get rid of condenses on the your glasses or prescription insert.

I have founf Fog_Tech to be very effective if applied freshly on the glasses or inserts. I clean them off at lunch at apply a new fresh application.

Taking your googles on or off has no effect on the the glasses or inserts. In fact by lifting the bottom of my goggles off my face shortly after getting on the chair after a run and switching my fan to is very effective in "dehumidyfying" the air inside the goggle.

Trust me, I have spent hours and literally several hundred dollars working on a setup that is suitable.
ignore everything this guy said and for anyone reading this in the archives someday, just do what i said.. don't bother with expensive bulky goggles with fans or expensive prescription goggles, etc.. just put your goggles on and keep them on and you won't fog up.. or if you do a little bit it'll clear up the second you start moving and get some air flow.. it took me a long time to realize this incredibly simple solution to a problem that plagued me for ten years.. i would fog so i would pull the goggles off a bit to get some air in and clear them and put then back on but then they would fog up again even faster and i would take them off on the chair, etc.. just makes it worse. i've tried all the crap mentionned in this thread, its not worth it and most of it doesn't do anything.. just don't take your goggles off, wear appropriate clothes so that you're not steaming all the time, and keep your vents clear. im not going to argue the physics of it, it just works, period.
post #18 of 28
I agree with Atomicman. I've heard the "keep the goggles on" argument before. Maybe that works for some people at some times but most of the time I'm generating my own moisture so what I need is more ventilation, not less. That's what the fan provides.

It's interesting how different we all are but how we often apply what works for us to the general population. My wife and I ski together. She dresses WARM and I dress light. My boots, gloves and helmet are always damp. She has no idea what a problem a wet boot can be. Even after skiing all her life when our kids had cold feet she just put on more socks. (They sweat like their dad.) When I told here their feet were wet she wanted to duct tape the boots. I finally convinced her it was sweat - not snow.
post #19 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by quixotle
ignore everything this guy said and for anyone reading this in the archives someday, just do what i said.. don't bother with expensive bulky goggles with fans or expensive prescription goggles, etc.. just put your goggles on and keep them on and you won't fog up.. or if you do a little bit it'll clear up the second you start moving and get some air flow.. it took me a long time to realize this incredibly simple solution to a problem that plagued me for ten years.. i would fog so i would pull the goggles off a bit to get some air in and clear them and put then back on but then they would fog up again even faster and i would take them off on the chair, etc.. just makes it worse. i've tried all the crap mentionned in this thread, its not worth it and most of it doesn't do anything.. just don't take your goggles off, wear appropriate clothes so that you're not steaming all the time, and keep your vents clear. im not going to argue the physics of it, it just works, period.
this is the most ludicrous thing I have heard in along time. Ridiculous! Absolutely not true!

LISTEN TO ME LOUD & CLEAR!!! IT IS NOT THE GOGGLES FOGGING IT IS THE GLASSES OR INSERTS WORN BENETH THE GOGGLES! THE MOISTURE COMES FORM ONES FACE AND HAS NOWHERE TO GO. SO IT CONDENSES ON THE GLASSES OR PRESCRIPTION INSERT. NOT TAKING THE GOGGLES OFF DOES NOTHING BUT MAKE IT WORSE. THERE IS JUST TOO MUCH MOISTURE IN THERE AND IT CAN'T BE DISPERSED!!!!! PERIOD END OF SUBJECT

FOG-TECH WORKS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I AM QUITE SURE YOU WORK UP NO SWEAT AT ALL, REGARDLESS OF YOUR DRESS, ON THE DAMN BUNNY HILL.

I think I have a pretty dgood grip on how to use my goggles after skiing for 40 years.
post #20 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman
this is the most ludicrous thing I have heard in along time. Ridiculous! Absolutely not true!

LISTEN TO ME LOUD & CLEAR!!! IT IS NOT THE GOGGLES FOGGING IT IS THE GLASSES OR INSERTS WORN BENETH THE GOGGLES! THE MOISTURE COMES FORM ONES FACE AND HAS NOWHERE TO GO. SO IT CONDENSES ON THE GLASSES OR PRESCRIPTION INSERT. NOT TAKING THE GOGGLES OFF DOES NOTHING BUT MAKE IT WORSE. THERE IS JUST TOO MUCH MOISTURE IN THERE AND IT CAN'T BE DISPERSED!!!!! PERIOD END OF SUBJECT

FOG-TECH WORKS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I AM QUITE SURE YOU WORK UP NO SWEAT AT ALL, REGARDLESS OF YOUR DRESS, ON THE DAMN BUNNY HILL.

I think I have a pretty dgood grip on how to use my goggles after skiing for 40 years.
uh huh, the problem with goggles and glasses fogging is that moisture gets inside.. how does moisture get inside? from people taking off their goggles and putting them on their heads. most people have fogging problems when its snowing, why? because their tuques are covered in snow and because snow falls inside their goggles as they're taking them on and off.. or if they fall. keep your goggles on, moisture doesn't get inside. if you're so hot that you're fogging up even though you're skiing because you're steaming so much, you're overdressed.

but enjoy your fog tech, your bulky goggles with whirring fans, your over-priced prescription lenses that force you to carry around glasses in your pocket.. for those of you who haven't wasted your money yet, just try what i said first.. you'd be surprised at how effective it is. the only time i fogged was if i was getting bogged down in the trees, or if i was hiking and didn't open up or layer down enough.
post #21 of 28
Uh.... I'm almost afraid to get involved here, but what the heck...I'm looking to get my husband prescription goggles just because they'd be more convenient. So in terms of convenience, price, and what works best with a helmet, what would the best choice be? And IF fogging WERE an issue -- let's just throw that in because I'm a crazy spend thrift and feel like wasting money -- what's good?
post #22 of 28
Anyone who skis hard, especially on the east coast, where it's humid, is going to get fog. The air doesn't move well between the insert and the goggle lens, and sometime you can't always keep moving (such as riding lifts) to keep air moving through the goggles. Yes, mine fogged up more if I put them on my head, and would clear up instantly if I lifted the bottom of the goggle frame away from my face. If it was raining or snowing (yes, I ski in the rain sometimes), I'd carry a small cloth to wipe off the front of my helmet if I wanted to put my goggles up. But since I couldn't see much without the Rx goggles on, I didn't put them up much. As a matter of fact, unless it was brutally cold, I'd wear Rx sunglasses that wrapped around my face enough to keep the wind out of my eyes. It was much easier than dealing with the Rx goggles.

Ski Diva - You can have mine. I just had Lasik. I'll give away the Rx insert (Bolle), and sell the goggles that they fit into (2 pair) cheap.
post #23 of 28
JohnH -- Great! Sending you a PM.
post #24 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski Diva
Uh.... I'm almost afraid to get involved here, but what the heck...I'm looking to get my husband prescription goggles just because they'd be more convenient. So in terms of convenience, price, and what works best with a helmet, what would the best choice be? And IF fogging WERE an issue -- let's just throw that in because I'm a crazy spend thrift and feel like wasting money -- what's good?
I am equally afraid to answer!
post #25 of 28
Tastes Great! Less Filling!...

Actually, you are both right. A good consistent airflow and a good anti-fog in combination with the discipline to put your goggles on as you leave the lodge, and leave them on, works best for me. If fogging starts, I pull the goggles out from my face and let air in.

This all assumes that you are fortunate enough to avoid a yardsale fall (including your goggles) into powder!
post #26 of 28
My goggles never fog. it is only the insert and not any longer since I have used Fog-tech!

I have always put my goglles on before I have left the lodge and never put them on my forehead.

This does not help anything at all.

Of course I am overdressed! (rolleyes)
post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski Diva
Uh.... I'm almost afraid to get involved here, but what the heck...I'm looking to get my husband prescription goggles just because they'd be more convenient. So in terms of convenience, price, and what works best with a helmet, what would the best choice be? And IF fogging WERE an issue -- let's just throw that in because I'm a crazy spend thrift and feel like wasting money -- what's good?
prescription goggles are a waste, they will fog just like any other goggle/glasses, you are blind without them on, and have to carry your glasses with you. there are several models of otg (over the glasses) goggles. different goggles work with different helmets, if you have a helmet, bring it to the store and try on their selection of otg goggles.
post #28 of 28
Lots of good information all around... That said, I just picked up a K2 Blackhawk ski helmet with the integrated K2 One goggle. Anyone know where, online, that I can order prescription inserts for these goggles? Thanks.
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