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land rider:

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
I saw an infomercial for that bike. they showed it going pased this fast road bike, and the guy on that bike had his bike in the wrong gear to make it seem like he was strugling hard peddling. also, It said it had "auto shift", so it was supposed to shift by itself. But then they said it had a front shilamo dirailer so it would have to be shifted in the front. Also, they compared it to road bikes, but it was in the mountain bike class. it also said it's the only bike with a frame designed to keep you up-right but mountain bikes have that up-right frame. And, it had brakes that fall apart easily.
post #2 of 29
Somewhat lighter + more gears than a Schwinn Transport with an Auto-D hub.

It's a niche.
post #3 of 29
P.o.s.
post #4 of 29
Yeah, that's what I thought when my father wanted to try biking again after seeing one of those adverts and a 40 year hiatus. He was really, really paranoid about having to learn to shift, and didn't want anything that looked like drop bars nor did he want the shifting anywhere near the brakes.

So I found him a Columbus-tubed Schwinn Tempo frame, dressed it as a 1x7 with a BMX crank and a 105 rear. Shifting is by a barcon at the right pinky so it isn't too visually intrusive.

That's where the problems started. Have you ever tried to fit flat-bar brakes AND barcons onto the same bar? It took forever to find the right combination of steel Nitto North Road, barcon, and Shimano women's adjustable pull&reach brake levers. Eouf.

Anyway. I fancy it rides better than any infomercial heap, and I might even put it up against a Breezer Elite for the ride if not for the total outfitting package.
post #5 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skilom_141
I saw an infomercial for that bike. they showed it going pased this fast road bike, and the guy on that bike had his bike in the wrong gear to make it seem like he was strugling hard peddling. also, It said it had "auto shift", so it was supposed to shift by itself. But then they said it had a front shilamo dirailer so it would have to be shifted in the front. Also, they compared it to road bikes, but it was in the mountain bike class. it also said it's the only bike with a frame designed to keep you up-right but mountain bikes have that up-right frame. And, it had brakes that fall apart easily.
Rule number 3 of life: don't believe what you see on TV. Rule 3a. infomercials are not to be trusted. A road bike is a light fast sleek machine that will outride anything on pavement.

Autoshift bikes are for fools and suckers. Get a real bike. Modern bikes are easy to shift. Autoshit, sorry , autoshift bikes are just a gimmick.
post #6 of 29
Thread Starter 
yeah, my dad is a bike genius. His first job was to assemble bike and he got into harder stuff too. He has done a lot of work with bikes. thats how we knew this land rider was a cheap N.S bike.

Even if you did not know alot about bikes, you could tell that guy on the road bike was going slow on purpose. I mean, his bike was going up a hill on a really high gear.
post #7 of 29
What do you mean by a really high gear? Just kidding, but a lot of people just can't get it, even if you tell them it's like a car, lower number gear easier, higher number faster. They just can't or won't do it. I can't drive a car with manual shifter, so I kind of understand. It's for people who buy a bike and ride it twice then its buried in the garage. Maybe they want to own a bike but don't want ride it or learn anything about riding that they hadn't learned by age six. I would like to try one, but for my daily transportation, I'll ride a geared bike, front and rear, thank you.
post #8 of 29
A few years ago, a coworker of a friend (Gill here in Epic) came mountain biking with us on one of those auto shift POSs. To put it simply, it didn't work and was a friggin boat anchor. And we were on easy, smooth, totally non-technical single track. I think he rode the bike twice, then bought a normal low to mid line MTB. Don't know what he did with the auto shift bike. Gill may know. It may work for slow, easy bike path (paved or packed gravel) stuff, but that's about it... Assuming you don't mind riding a 45 lb hunk o' crap.

Just to say that you bought anything from an infomercial is embarassing enough.
post #9 of 29
I have shimano ultegra flightdeck controls on my bike. It's like having paddle gears on a car - very easy to work, and no need to move your hands from where they are. To shift to a larger gear, you push the brake lever sideways in. To move to a smaller gear, there is a lever under the brake that you push in. Right hand does the wheel gears, left does the pedal ones.

This is a newer version than mine, but it's the same principle...
post #10 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wear The Fox Hat
I have shimano ultegra flightdeck controls on my bike. It's like having paddle gears on a car - very easy to work, and no need to move your hands from where they are. To shift to a larger gear, you push the brake lever sideways in. To move to a smaller gear, there is a lever under the brake that you push in. Right hand does the wheel gears, left does the pedal ones.

This is a newer version than mine, but it's the same principle...
Yeah, I think I saw a few minutes of that infomercial last year, and noticed that the road bike rider they showed, who was having a hard time shifting gears, was on an old bike with down tube friction shifters. The modern shifters from Shimano and Campy are a different animal all together. I have Shimano also, but I like the Campy ergo shifters, where the down shift is a thumb trigger on the side of the hood. Seems easier to use, although probably not enough to really matter.
post #11 of 29
yeah, I like the campagnoli ones too, but I'm very happy with the shimanos. My old MTB had thumb selectors, but they weren't that good, and before that I had a road bike with down tube ones... there's always that fun bit where you take your eye off the road, your hand off the wheel, and try to push the lever JUST enough...
post #12 of 29
My 10-speed has the old friction levers on the frame. No indicators to click into the gear, but I don't care; If I'm not in top gear, or 1st any gear in between will do. I've occasionally knocked the bike into a higher gear with my knee at exactly the wrong time. And they are in a pretty scary place if you crash:. The twist-grip shifters on my daughter's bike seem to work OK. I don't know how bad they will be once they get a little wear on 'em though.

infomercial description reminds me of a Mazda commercial that gives the impression Mazdas are faster that sport bikes: .
post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wear The Fox Hat
I have shimano ultegra flightdeck controls on my bike. It's like having paddle gears on a car - very easy to work, and no need to move your hands from where they are. To shift to a larger gear, you push the brake lever sideways in. To move to a smaller gear, there is a lever under the brake that you push in. Right hand does the wheel gears, left does the pedal ones.

This is a newer version than mine, but it's the same principle...
I just got a new bike that has these. It is such an improvement from the finger tip control on the bars. But I just have the vastly inferior 105's
post #14 of 29
Hey Skilom why don't you have your daddy build you a auto shift bike from his spare parts.?
Any genius could do it easily
. Why buy some P.O.S. when dad can make you the finest in all the land??
post #15 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ
I just got a new bike that has these. It is such an improvement from the finger tip control on the bars. But I just have the vastly inferior 105's
GarryZ,

Does this new ultegra shifter work any different than the olde 105 or Ultegra STI shifters? Or are you referring to pre-STI? I have a mix of 105 and Ultegra on my bike (105 shifters), and by appearances, the Ultegra in the picture looks like it functions the same way. I really like my shifters. Am I missing something?
post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH
Am I missing something?
I don't think so wrt. the above shifters.

Check out the new SRAM Force though, you can shift up OR down with the brake fully squeezed.
post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex
I don't think so wrt. the above shifters.

Check out the new SRAM Force though, you can shift up OR down with the brake fully squeezed.
Ohhhh, I like that! I often have to let go of the brake to downshift when coming to a street crossing on my commute.

I lust for a Sram X0 rear derailleur for my MTB. Why it took so long to invent a straight pull rear derailleur, as opposed to that stupid 180 degree bend that the Shimano forces is beyond me.

My next bike, if not purcased built, or my next derailleur will be Sram. I've heard nothing but great stuff about them.
post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH
GarryZ,

Does this new ultegra shifter work any different than the olde 105 or Ultegra STI shifters? Or are you referring to pre-STI? I have a mix of 105 and Ultegra on my bike (105 shifters), and by appearances, the Ultegra in the picture looks like it functions the same way. I really like my shifters. Am I missing something?
I am not familiar with those. You shift down by pushing brake lever in and up shift by pushing a smaller lever on the brake in . The front sprocket works in reverse. I would guess they are very similar and mine is just a newer model .
My British made Raleigh had fingertip controls that take more action and alteration of balance to shift them.

I am very impressed with my 105's
post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ
I am not familiar with those. You shift down by pushing brake lever in and up shift by pushing a smaller lever on the brake in . The front sprocket works in reverse. I would guess they are very similar and mine is just a newer model .
My British made Raleigh had fingertip controls that take more action and alteration of balance to shift them.

I am very impressed with my 105's
I must have misunderstood your original message. The 105s you have are the standard 105 STI shifters, same as mine. Although I don't know what STI stands for, it refers to the system where you can connect the Shimano Flight Deck cyclocomputer to them, and it will show you what gear you are in, front and rear. I find it easier to just look down if I need to :
post #20 of 29

To each his own..this is what I ride


post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH
Although I don't know what STI stands for, :
Shimano Total Integration
post #22 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by carbonissimo

Someday you can get the rest of the bike, huh
post #23 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ
Someday you can get the rest of the bike, huh
Not so much, these are his:


Full record on most of them I think, the King (bottom left) for sure.
post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by doublediamond223
Not so much, these are his:


Full record on most of them I think, the King (bottom left) for sure.
I guess those are adequete. I think the land rider would still power past them up hills:
post #25 of 29
"Full record on most of them I think, the King (bottom left) for sure."


88 SLX C Record Delta 7spd
95 ELOS Record Ergo 8spd
01 UD Record Carbon 10 spd
02 King Record Carbon 10spd

much more then adequate:
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by carbonissimo
"Full record on most of them I think, the King (bottom left) for sure."


88 SLX C Record Delta 7spd
95 ELOS Record Ergo 8spd
01 UD Record Carbon 10 spd
02 King Record Carbon 10spd

much more then adequate:
Brother Carb, did you see the sarcastic icon?

Your bikes are some of the finest I have seen anywhere. I would love to ride any of them.
post #27 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ
Brother Carb, did you see the sarcastic icon?

Your bikes are some of the finest I have seen anywhere. I would love to ride any of them.

Roger that GarryZ!...much more then adequate : I'm with ya...
post #28 of 29
Much is made of this feature (and the lack of a Hyperglide tooth lag), so:

How often DO you double up or down shift?
post #29 of 29
I double upshift quite a bit when I've got a good steep downhill, and want to hit top gear and leave it there. Also when starting off. I double down when I'm coming to a halt.
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