New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Vacuum Waxing

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Are you familiar with this? I live in Japan, went to my local shop to order some new boards. Then the little shop rat brought out a brochure to promote his new machine. A giant steel tube in which to place skis and then seal and use a vacuum to suck the fibers out of the base to instigate a deeper wax. The statistics seemed logical enough; wax deeper in my base. But any side-effects? I've been tuning my own gear every day for the last fifteen years, this is mind-boggling to me. You shop rats got the skinny on this? Are those fibers going to settle again? I hope my independent tuning fetishes haven't excluded me from a god-send to the tuning industry. clue me in...
post #2 of 17
I wouldn't think the vacuum would cause any side effects.
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
so are you familiar with this magical tube?
post #4 of 17

Sounds like horse hockey to me...

...I'd just make a hot box and go with that. For info, go to:

www.rmmskiracing.org

Go to the SnowNews and Articles page, go down past all the SnowNews articles to Articles-->Richard Malmros--> HotBox from Hell - Redux
post #5 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by samurai
so are you familiar with this magical tube?
No, but now that I think about it I can imagine one advantage (see below)


Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiRacer55
...I'd just make a hot box and go with that.
It may have an advantage since in a hot box the wax must displace the air in the pores of the base, but under vacuum the air is removed from the pores. This should facilitate the uptake of wax. I am not sure if it is necessarily better than a regular hotbox, but I suspect it would be faster.
post #6 of 17
This sounds like a pure gimmick.

If the vacuum is "drawing" on the "fibers" ... is it not also drawing on the wax?

Heating acts at the molecular level and allows penetration .... how the heck is a vac gonna do that?

This is a job for Physics Man ....
post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 
It didn't seem to gimmicky. It's also heated. basically, it's a hotbox void of air. the presentation wasn't gimmicky. It was seriously world-class. Shocking actually. It looked like tens of thousands of dollars of development. the most impressive ski tuning machine I have ever seen. My skepticism comes from the shock value.
post #8 of 17
Hanishimasta? :

What was the cost of this new waxing? If it was a dime more, I'd tend to say that it does not cost out. You still have to replace the surface wax that is worn off during the normal course of the ski day.

Ski a lot or under poor snow conditions = wax a lot (daily).

I have yet to find a remakable difference that is detectable by the "average" skier who engages in a daily or every other time waxing.

At the race level, this may play out but it sounds like overkill. Does he claim that you can go more days with out a wax?
post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 
I'm not a racer, but still a daily waxer. I would consider it more as a seasonal, or even monthly thing. just a way to get an initial, deeply set foundation that you can still add onto. Something more to fight that dry edge you can get after two days should you not have daily access to wax.
post #10 of 17
Wax or the sword .... "practice this daily" .... Miyamoto Musashi ....
post #11 of 17
I'm with Yuki on this one.

I don't see anything intuitive or logical that suggests there's any benefit to the vacuum. The hotbox, sure, though maybe only to racers.
post #12 of 17
Waste of money. An equivalent of the power flushing of
every conceivable fluid that auto dealers try to sell.
post #13 of 17
I wouldn't wax the vaccum. I can't even keep my skis waxed.


Sounds like how we impregnate porous rock samples with epoxy. You cover the sample with the liqiuid, vacuum out all air, then allow air back in. FFFPPP!, all the epoxy goes into the pores.

Sound like a lot of work for something one day of corn snow could ruin.
post #14 of 17
I think it might work a little better, but traditional hot waxing works well enough, so I'll go along with Yuki, and parrot "Do nothing that is of no use."
post #15 of 17
I would not do this to my skis! Vacuum plus heat can cause some glues and other materials to breakdown and deteriorate. Wood can expand in a vacuum. When you put materials in a vacuum and heat them they begin to out gas. You can't control which materials are out gassing. I don't think that when the Ski Company's Designers were picking their materials for their skis that they taught "hey, these skis must survive in a vacuum".
post #16 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpudDog
I would not do this to my skis! Vacuum plus heat can cause some glues and other materials to breakdown and deteriorate. Wood can expand in a vacuum. When you put materials in a vacuum and heat them they begin to out gas. You can't control which materials are out gassing. I don't think that when the Ski Company's Designers were picking their materials for their skis that they taught "hey, these skis must survive in a vacuum".
Wood expanding in a vaccuum is exactly what I've been waiting to hear. I was concerned about the glues as well. the word out-gassing explains why it was a concern. Cheers.
post #17 of 17

What he said...

Quote:
Originally Posted by samurai
Wood expanding in a vaccuum is exactly what I've been waiting to hear. I was concerned about the glues as well. the word out-gassing explains why it was a concern. Cheers.
...I think it's fair to say that a product that costs in the tens of thousands and can trash your skis truly does suck. Make yourself a hotbox for less than $200 and be happy...see my earlier post...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs