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Asymmetrically mounted skis

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
So with the advent of fat and really fat skis I was thinking about the way fat skis are generally a lot slower edge to edge. This is due to the distance between your center of pressure on the ski and the edge(lets call this x) being a lot larger. So, it may sound stupid, but what about setting up each ski for a specific foot and mounting the binding closer to the inside edge. This would give a much smaller x on your outside ski and make it much quicker to roll into a turn.

This has a couple of problems that i can see:

When attempting to track straight there would be a greater pressure on the inside edge, causing problems. But mounting closer to the inside edge doesn't have to mean the binding is completely on one side, just 5mm over or so. This could be compensated for by an unusual stance. But more importantly , these days, how often are you really trying to track dead straight? It's way more fun to leave trenches everywhere you go

Secondly, you would probably have to adopt a much more uneven weighting on your skis in turns, currently i would say that i put about 65-75% of weight on the outside ski most of the time but i would think to cope with the different characteristics of each ski you would want like 90% of your weight on your outside ski and just track your inside one for balance due to the very large x for this ski. This could work because the small x on your outside ski would feel like a normal racer/carve ski.

Perhaps theres issues are larger than i predict, but i belive that there is room for development if a ski were to be specifically developed for this type of use, through asymmetric sidecut design and torsional stiffness i think the problems could be minimised and skiing style adapted.

I found it interesting to consider, and in a few years time when the current generation for fats are getting old and retiring i may just give it a try.

What are your thoughts?
(Braces for being laughed out of the forums... )
post #2 of 7
Errr....I have two pairs of old school fat that are supposed to be mounted aysmm....I mounted centered, because everybody said they skied better that way.
post #3 of 7
Well most people who buy fats don't buy them to carve, and i would guess they would create more base area to one side of you, meaning that you would be kindof unbalanced, especially when straightlining.
post #4 of 7
HS,

Good to see you back.
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by aussie_bear
[font=Verdana, Arial][size=2] So with the advent of fat and really fat skis I was thinking about the way fat skis are generally a lot slower edge to edge. This is due to the distance between your center of pressure on the ski and the edge(lets call this x) being a lot larger. So, it may sound stupid, but what about setting up each ski for a specific foot and mounting the binding closer to the inside edge. This would give a much smaller x on your outside ski and make it much quicker to roll into a turn.
Except that it would also slow down the rollover of your -inside- foot. Visualise massive A-frame shudder here.

Quote:
What are your thoughts?
Except for the natural supinators, it's probably easier to roll over medially. So, when you mount them offset, you might try them in the opposite direction (fat part in).

Then consider a cant strip with fat part mounted toward the fat part of the ski.

(and don't forget those asymmetric brake bends).
post #6 of 7
Here's another "What if?" question. Some instructors encourage more distance between the edges in most turns and keeping some weight on the inside ski. The outside ski carries significantly more weight than the inside ski so it flexes more which should make a tighter arc, although the outside ski has farther to travel. We're encouraged to ski a more two footed style. Should the outside edge of the shaped ski have a different radius to allow for the shorter radius on the inside of a turn and the reduced flex of the inside ski?
post #7 of 7
Steve, been there done that. Atomic made a GS ski (9.26?) with asymetrical edges (shape). Dynastar has played with the idea a few times also (flex, sidewall material and shape), it has never set the world on fire. Heck, Stockli's DP this year was 'asymetrical' in flex. It creates a problem if you damage an inside edge on one ski.

The offset edge idea for fat skis, see Atomic Powder Plus and Rossi Axiom. They ski funny, don't likey.
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