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Fish on the Grill

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
I simply adore any fish on the grill! Preferably, I like to cook the whole fish, small salmon, mackerel, striper, bluefish, steaked shark or cobia, in a basket with veggies.

Here's my favorite marinate/seasoning: in canola oil (with a shot of olive oil for flavor) add about a quarter by volume lemon juice, and whip it good. The blend will emulsify to a creamy appearance. Add garlic (powder or fresh) and leaf oregano. Baste the fish with it, and use the sauce when serving. The sauce works well with chicken and meat/tofu/soy kebobs, and is high in antioxidants.

Bon appetit!
post #2 of 29
Great Recipe! I'll be trying that real soon.
do you use a plank when you grill fish. I just started using a plank and love it

When summer is a rush and I don't have time to get fresh fish, I buy Blue Hake from Schwans.
the filets are thick, and individually wrapped and packaged in a box. Great alternative to fresh and easy to keep on hand.
post #3 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mainiac
I simply adore any fish on the grill! Preferably, I like to cook the whole fish, small salmon, mackerel, striper, bluefish, steaked shark or cobia, in a basket with veggies.

Here's my favorite marinate/seasoning: in canola oil (with a shot of olive oil for flavor) add about a quarter by volume lemon juice, and whip it good. The blend will emulsify to a creamy appearance. Add garlic (powder or fresh) and leaf oregano. Baste the fish with it, and use the sauce when serving. The sauce works well with chicken and meat/tofu/soy kebobs, and is high in antioxidants.

Bon appetit!
Mainiac, Use this sauce all the time for seafood grilling. Try adding fresh rosemary to it....this is the same recipe that Mosca's in N.O. uses for their Bar-b-q shrimp....Serve with fresh french bread dipped in sauce!
Eh-Ahhhhhhh
post #4 of 29
Thread Starter 

Makin' Mako....

Rajin thanks for the herbal insight....a buddy of mine came up from the coast with some fresh Mako...magnificent loin cuts with salmon color......grilled them with zucchini and Vidalia onions...the onions carmelized and were killuh...be sure to get field dried onions as opposed to commercially gased ones......
post #5 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick
Great Recipe! I'll be trying that real soon.
do you use a plank when you grill fish. I just started using a plank and love it

When summer is a rush and I don't have time to get fresh fish, I buy Blue Hake from Schwans.
the filets are thick, and individually wrapped and packaged in a box. Great alternative to fresh and easy to keep on hand.
trekchick do you mean a cedar plank with Asian type seasoning? I recently had plank Salmon in Charleston for the first time...it was fabulous!
post #6 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mainiac
trekchick do you mean a cedar plank with Asian type seasoning? I recently had plank Salmon in Charleston for the first time...it was fabulous!
Yup!
We have a gourmet cooking store in our town.
They carry a lot of specialty Grill items in the summer ......planks(awesome for fish) and grill woks(great for veggies). The options for Grills are endless. I intend on trying as many of those options as I can.
post #7 of 29
Try adding the oil to the acid in a slow tream while whipping and it will emulsify more quickly.

Here's something that works well on thick cuts, such as ahi, shark, yellow tail or ono that you want to sear but leave somewhat undercooked in the middle; take mayonaise; season; add toasted sesame oil to taste and, if desired, chili powder, paste, hot paprika or cayenne. Spread, fairly thickly, on both sides of fish. Grill over hot fire. The mayo will mostly burn off leaving the spice and sesame flavor, while keeping the outer layer of the fish moist. Also makes for good grill marks.
post #8 of 29
Thread Starter 
...make that lawyers, guns, money and good recipes! Neat variant prep method, and the recipe looks delicious, irul&ublo, I will definately try it as I enjoy various peppers.

In fact am going to the Farmer's Market this Saturday morning for a bushel of Cayennes to can. I call them my "beer buddies."
post #9 of 29
My favorite, when I can get it is Achiote sea bass. Achiote is a mayan spice one can find in little blocks at Mexican specialty shops. Dissolve it in lime juice, soak the fish, and cook over real charcoal. It turns the fish bright orange.
post #10 of 29
Achiote is great for grilled fish, newfydog

I make my achiote rub with OJ concentrate instead of the lime juice. I also add a good shot of canola oil and a little chopped fresh garlic.
post #11 of 29
How about Bluefish "cheeks" ... the best part of a Blue!
post #12 of 29
I have been eating a lot of fish of late about 2:1 over meat. A variation in the mayo, wasabi mayo adds a bit of flavor.
post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by MisterK
Achiote is great for grilled fish, newfydog

I make my achiote rub with OJ concentrate instead of the lime juice. I also add a good shot of canola oil and a little chopped fresh garlic.
What fish do you use? I first had it on fresh caught Barracuda. I've heard Northern Pike is good, and trigger fish is ok. Salmon so-so, halibut is a waste because it doesn't soak in. Chilean sea bass is heaven.

I've used white wine, which is ok. haven't tried OJ.
post #14 of 29
The belly fillet from a summer flounder. So much more tasty than the more meaty top fillet.

Done lightly on the grill, a bit of butter and a smidge of fresh dill.
post #15 of 29
Snapper blues (7" baby blues) .... slick a few fillets and onto the tin foil for a light ride on the grill. Sometimes with bread crumbs.

Make plenty cause the next day left overs can be a killer cold sandwich. Home made "tartar sauce" (Hellmans Mayo and a bit of relish mixed) and served on a fresh Portuguese roll.
post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog
What fish do you use? I first had it on fresh caught Barracuda. I've heard Northern Pike is good, and trigger fish is ok. Salmon so-so, halibut is a waste because it doesn't soak in. Chilean sea bass is heaven.

I've used white wine, which is ok. haven't tried OJ.
You're right about sea bass, but grouper is probably my favorite - it does well on the grill. Give halibut another shot sometime, but use halibut steaks instead of filet (because they are cut radialy you will get better penetration from the rub.)

The OJ is very good with the achiote because it provides a nice bright counterpoint to the earthy flavor of the achiote. I use the same marinade for chicken breast sometimes which I grill and slice for fajitas and it's also great for pork tenderloin cooked on the grill.

For grilled salmon I like to baste it with sweet cherry BBQ sauce. The easy route is to get a can of sweet dark cherries in light syrup and puree them in the blender with regular bullseye BBQ sauce. Make sure to use the syrup too and season the sauce to taste with a little fresh lemon juice and a couple of hits of tabasco. The cherry BBQ sauce is also great on grilled jumbo prawns.
post #17 of 29
My favorite fish - steaks or fillets, not whole fish - marinade:

Sesame oil, soy sauce, FRESH (dry will not work) ginger juice squeezed through a garlic press, garlic and an acid. You can use lemon, lime, orange or white wine depending on what you feel like. marinate for an hour at least. Then roll the steaks in seseame seeds and plop on the grill. Makes a nice, cruchy outside.

Optional: Serve with a chutney of mango, cilantro, sweet onion and red and yellow peppers.
post #18 of 29
I like to do Salmon on the grill, one of my favorites here in the NW. It is simple to do and tastes great. Depending on how big it is the amount of ingredients will vary, but you can eye ball it and be safe.

Ok, so take some FRESH dill, chop about 1/3 of what you have. If you have a larger salmon you will want several good size sprigs.

Now take a couple of lemons and slice them, as well the juice of half another lemon...no seeds please.

Also will need salt, pepper, and a cedar plank.

Now take the cleaned and gutted Salmon, pour the juice of the lemon around the inside, salt and than pepper. Than evenly stuff it with the Dill and Lemon, and set on the cedar plank.

Now at this point you can than wrap it with foil if you choose and put it on the grill, or just put it on the grill by itself. Whatever you choose...however once its on the grill....cover it....and leave it alone until it just starts to flake....you will know when its done.


Also another way of doing this without the plank, is to have wood chips soaked and than placed in a small tin down in the coals.
post #19 of 29
I'm doing some salmon right now on the Weber Smokey Mountain. I put a hot fire in the bottom instead of the middle and leave the water pan out. Put the fish on the top position. This provides roasting heat and a bit of direct heat.

I put the a salmon fillet on foil skin side down, sprinkle with the same southwest style rub I'd use on BBQ. I fold up the edges of the foil and then just plot it on the top grill. Then add a chunk of hickory to the fire. THe fish smoke/roasts and also fries a little bit in its own fat on the foil.
post #20 of 29
im getting hungry reading about this
post #21 of 29
favorite SAlmon recipe:
nice fatty wild salmon, try to get consistent thickness
marinate it good bourbon for about an hour. You don't have to drown it.
Season with sea salt and pepper
heat grill to about 500
Soak cedar plank about 1 hour
Place plank on grill for about 15 minutes before putting salmon on plank. Once it starts to smoke, I put the salmon in the plank and monitor to make sure plank doesn't catch on fire.
Cook as desired, I like a little on the rare side.

Whole fish: ( any kind of fish but best with snapper, grouper, sea bass, or my favorite, branzini)
stuff inside thyme, rosemary, sage. Salt, pepper, olive oil,
Cover fish in olive oil and sea salt. Heat grill to 450-500, place on grill sprayed with PAM or any other non-stick spray (this works very well - do not use foil! The fish will brown up and the skin will become wonderfully crispy-YUM) sear for a few minutes on one side, lower temp to about 400, bake until almost done, flip after 12-15 minutes, finish on other side for about 5-8 minutes (depending on thickness)
post #22 of 29
I have found the best flavor if you like smoke is from alder or apple wood/chips. Hickory and mesquite too strong IMO. That farm raised salmon we get tastes great using these if you like that kind of flavor.
post #23 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
favorite SAlmon recipe:
nice fatty wild salmon, try to get consistent thickness
marinate it good bourbon for about an hour. You don't have to drown it.
Season with sea salt and pepper
heat grill to about 500
Soak cedar plank about 1 hour
Place plank on grill for about 15 minutes before putting salmon on plank. Once it starts to smoke, I put the salmon in the plank and monitor to make sure plank doesn't catch on fire.
Cook as desired, I like a little on the rare side.

Whole fish: ( any kind of fish but best with snapper, grouper, sea bass, or my favorite, branzini)
stuff inside thyme, rosemary, sage. Salt, pepper, olive oil,
Cover fish in olive oil and sea salt. Heat grill to 450-500, place on grill sprayed with PAM or any other non-stick spray (this works very well - do not use foil! The fish will brown up and the skin will become wonderfully crispy-YUM) sear for a few minutes on one side, lower temp to about 400, bake until almost done, flip after 12-15 minutes, finish on other side for about 5-8 minutes (depending on thickness)
A1!
post #24 of 29
i really like smoky flavors with salmon too..
post #25 of 29
Try good wild salmon and poach it in beer. Light tasting, crummy beer is best; Bud, or PBR, etc. Put it in a container that you can barbecue (I just use foil) and fill it so that the fish is not completely covered. Do not cover with anything, just put the lid on the barbecue. Some alder chips for smoke go good here. Watch it like a hawk. If the beer begins to disappear, pour on more. When the fish is just cooked, haul it off and dig in.

IMHO good salmon can be ruined by too much extra flavoring and overcooking. You might add a little lemon, or some Yoshida's sauce but it works great without anything else but beer. Bad or average fish needs some help and I tend to put more stuff on depending on my mood, but the really good stuff is best when its flavor is not covered up.

This simple recepie works well when camping.
post #26 of 29
poaching salmon in orange juice or cranberry juice or an orange/cran combo works quite well, too.

i just baked oysters with Anchor Steam the other night, btw.
post #27 of 29

....

As far as trout is concerned, having cooked up gazillions in my youth, there's a distinct difference in taste between the fish that, pretty much....feed exclusively on the aquatic flies....and those that are either meat eaters...or are fed pellets while in hatcheries. ....Just a heads up...unfortunately, I don't know of any restaurants that have their own angling personnel.;-) Wrapping em' up in aluminunm foil with some carrots, and a few onions & cranberries, then adding a little butter...etc...works and is easy over a campfire.
$.01
post #28 of 29
I follow Finndogs recipe as above almost to the letter. It works well with all kind of fish from mudcats to shad too!

One little exception however!

I usually just toss out the damned fish and eat the plank.
post #29 of 29
Unique problem here. The bears (not barking bears) come to lick off the grill. Even burning it off won't stop them. Found it dumped over with a big pile of what-bears-do-in the woods next to it today.

Thr trouble is we live in town and if people complain they come shoot the poor bear. No more barbeque until they bed down for the winter.
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