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Cameras to film video. Got opinions?

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
Stache posted a great idea about pulling out the old film and watching it on a rainy day.
Problem is i don't have a camera for this yet.

Can i get some recommendations for a good snow camera. Please include model numbers and general pricing if you know it.
I haven't researched this yet as far as differant formats and lenses . I would like to know what you are using and what you like or dislike and what would be a good purchase

It's never too late to film your family and friends and i better get on with it. Maybe a MA request for me also would be worthy to film:
post #2 of 27
Hi Garry, you knew it would be me, didn't you?

Do you really want "film" or are you talking about digital? The best option for capturing motion video and sound is any of a number of miniDV format recorders. They can be very inexpensive, or high-end professional models and accessorized with everything from helmet cams to tripods. So a little more input from you describing what you want, would help to narrow this discussion.

The nice thing about video is you can make it available online using compressed smaller format, or burn it to a DVD and watch it in full size. These two short videos were shot with a now 2-year old Panasonic GS120. Remember, editing requires a lot of disk space and processor power.

My daughter Alison Snowboarding Video Link

My day learning to Carve with AE at Heavenly Video Link

As far as old video or film, there are conversion methods to get it into digital, but I'll wait for your reply to find out just what you are asking.
post #3 of 27
I have noted that the 3-CCD cameras do a much better job capturing video on the snow than the 1-CCD ones. Has anyone else noticed that?
post #4 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider
Hi Garry, you knew it would be me, didn't you?

Do you really want "film" or are you talking about digital? The best option for capturing motion video and sound is any of a number of miniDV format recorders. They can be very inexpensive, or high-end professional models and accessorized with everything from helmet cams to tripods. So a little more input from you describing what you want, would help to narrow this discussion.

The nice thing about video is you can make it available online using compressed smaller format, or burn it to a DVD and watch it in full size. These two short videos were shot with a now 2-year old Panasonic GS120. Remember, editing requires a lot of disk space and processor power.

My daughter Alison Snowboarding Video Link

My day learning to Carve with AE at Heavenly Video Link

As far as old video or film, there are conversion methods to get it into digital, but I'll wait for your reply to find out just what you are asking.
Yeah . old school for capturing images. Ya gotta excuse me i got a suitcase full of Canon film gear.I have done some super 8 stuff i took in movie class about a million years ago but have no clue of what is the right thing to buy .
post #5 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider
Hi Garry, you knew it would be me, didn't you?

Do you really want "film" or are you talking about digital? The best option for capturing motion video and sound is any of a number of miniDV format recorders. They can be very inexpensive, or high-end professional models and accessorized with everything from helmet cams to tripods. So a little more input from you describing what you want, would help to narrow this discussion.

The nice thing about video is you can make it available online using compressed smaller format, or burn it to a DVD and watch it in full size. These two short videos were shot with a now 2-year old Panasonic GS120. Remember, editing requires a lot of disk space and processor power.

My daughter Alison Snowboarding Video Link

My day learning to Carve with AE at Heavenly Video Link

As far as old video or film, there are conversion methods to get it into digital, but I'll wait for your reply to find out just what you are asking.
I got the space for whatever i need. 120 drive and 1024memory. Wouldn't that be enough.? If i have to i can use bigger computers elsewhere
post #6 of 27
That's fine for starters. Its easy to add a dedicated hard drive for video. I recommend a 250 GB hard drive just because you can fill a drive so fast with this stuff. You will also need a firewiere IEEE 1394 port (cheap to add).

I still don't know what you are asking

Do you want to start using a digital video camera? What is your budget? You can get a great camera under $600. Like this much updated and enhanced version of my camera link This is a 3CCD unit with great optics, good image stabilizer. I can shoot a continuous hour on one battery outdoors with mine, so this should do fine. This camera will fit in a pocket or small pack and based on my experience tolerates some moisture and shock. You can spend from $250 to $3500 on DV cameras. It really depends on what you want.

Do you need to convert film or older VHS tape?
post #7 of 27
Thread Starter 
The camera you posted looks fine.
It has lens adaptability for macro and 2x

I would just need to download to my pc then do what i want with it from there .Yes?
Is there preferable software for this
I have the port you noted
post #8 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
I have noted that the 3-CCD cameras do a much better job capturing video on the snow than the 1-CCD ones. Has anyone else noticed that?
I found better color from a 3-ccd camera but it's more important to have a good video person with steady hands than anything else.

A lot of the 3ccd camera's are pro quality systems so it's more than just the sensors.

I'm very happy with the Sony DCR-PC5 that I have been using for many years now. List price was 1500.00 avail on ebay from time to time for around 200-250 depending on condition. Mini DV format, pretty rugged and decent battery life.

DC
post #9 of 27
Thread Starter 
What is the difference between 3-CCd and !-CCD. Resolution?

Obviously the image stabilization is important ,being hand held.
post #10 of 27
Charge-coupled devices... the things that act like "digital film". See http://cameras.about.com/od/digitalcamera101/g/gCCD.htm for more.
post #11 of 27
Thread Starter 
Thank's for the links. I'll do my homework now.
I don't want to spend a fortune on this stuff. I got skis to buy too.
If i can get one in the price range (600$or so)
The one Cirque linked me to was 520 and 264 for the extras and that seemed pretty reasonable to me
post #12 of 27
The best accessory is a polarizing filter for shooting on snow. It saturates the color of the sky and people on the close...well like polarized sunglasses do. A 3-CCD camera has a dedicated imager for Red Green Blue. It tends to be more accurate. Here is an extensive review of that camera. REVIEW I used the PV GS120 antique on my Carson Pass trip, and the battery outlasted my still digital camera. This is a still image (below) from the camcorder. It is a fully capable digital camera as well as video recorder, and uses separate SD memory for images.

Don't buy accessories until you use the camera. Shop price at a reputable dealer, then get the best price on quality accessories separately. I have purchased lots of gear from the link I gave you before. Be careful about prices that look too good. There are a lot of grey market items out there not made for distribution in the US, or refurbished. Warranties may be affected. Accessory packages are usually a rip-off of a great camera, and no-brand imported stuff. You may find you don't need a Macro or 2x, expecially since those funcitons are built in, and the camera has a 12X zoom. Any more than that, and you better have a tripod. This is my editing software.

post #13 of 27
the big advantage 3ccd camera's have are better color saturation and low light performance.

Both of the above I find are not big problems when shooting outdoors in the snow. Ease of use, quick focusing and good image stabilization has been the the most important in shooting video. An easy to control Zoom and good viewfinder are also very helpful. Watch out for some of the cheaper new camera's. I've seen a few with no view finder, Just the screen. How do you expect to see what you are shooting on an LCD in super bright light (snow). Sorry I don't understand that feature being left out on a camcorder..

If you are looking for a multipurpose camera to handle all your camera needs then it might make more sense. I'm lucky to have access to a high end 3ccd video camera for indoor "shows or programs" You can't beat a dedicated digital camera for stills. And a small video rugged, not too expensive DV can't be beat for MOST ski video.

Just food for thought.
post #14 of 27
I will say that this spring here in Colorado, the 3CCD cameras did a much better job of pulling the skiers' clothing colors out from the bright white snow. The 1CCD camera left us staring at black shadows against a white background, while Bob Barnes' 3CCD camera left us with clear differentiation between the skier and the snow. That's my primary source of judgement for this discussion.

The pictures that the 1CCD camera took were effectively worthless. I could not discern myself until I skied past the camera, and there were enough skiers with similar technique that I really couldn't tell it was me without the aid of a bit of color. That was a very frustrating experience, and certainly not the fault of the videographer. That's what has me asking about and leaning towards that 3CCD camera.

I just want to learn to be as "fast draw" as Faisasy. He's amazing. Although it seems that Cirque is pretty "quick draw", too!
post #15 of 27
Thread Starter 
I found a Panasonic gs300 for 429.00 and a gs 5oo for 499.00

Anyone familiar with the differances between these models.?
Cirquerider you said you had a similar model to the gs300 .Any thoughts on the gs500?
The gs500 is supposed to be the replacement/improvement of the gs400.



Any others that are of good value that could compete with these in price and quality?
post #16 of 27
There is a huge difference. Much larger than the price difference. The 500 does true widescreen video the 300 doesn't. The 500 has much higher performance. If you read the review linked above, the review does not give the GS500 a really stout recommendation, mainly because is is not seen by some to be a big improvement to the landmark 400; but a dumbed down version.

But look at the consumer comments. for $70 the 500 is probably a better deal by $200 in any comparison of technology. You can easily do some research on the 300 and 500, but the equipment is not even in the same league. The 300 is a 2-year old camera in a rapidly changing technology; the 500 is a brand new release. Like comparing a 486 with a new 3.4 Ghz P4 or better. BTW, PM me with the vendor/link, cause the price sounds too low for a legit deal. If its real, I might be in the market to upgrade.
post #17 of 27
I'd like to know, too. That price is unbelievable!
post #18 of 27
Thread Starter 
Too unvbelieveable.
The lowest sellers have the crappiest ratings i have ever seen.
Most had review titles, that said DON'T BUY FROM THESE CROOKS
Back to the starting point for me
Cirques link has best price so far for a recommended seller, 529, for the 300 and 699 for the 500
post #19 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
I will say that this spring here in Colorado, the 3CCD cameras did a much better job of pulling the skiers' clothing colors out from the bright white snow. The 1CCD camera left us staring at black shadows against a white background, while Bob Barnes' 3CCD camera left us with clear differentiation between the skier and the snow. That's my primary source of judgement for this discussion.

The pictures that the 1CCD camera took were effectively worthless. I could not discern myself until I skied past the camera, and there were enough skiers with similar technique that I really couldn't tell it was me without the aid of a bit of color. That was a very frustrating experience, and certainly not the fault of the videographer. That's what has me asking about and leaning towards that 3CCD camera.
I'd make sure both camera's were set in "ski/beach" mode or backlight mode. I find if I forget to set my camera into the ski/beach setting I have the same problem (black images against white screens) Being that Bob is using his camera all the time and for skiing, he probably has this part figured out.

Also the TRV900 is heads above many other video cameras. even other 3ccd units.

If you have the chance to get one of them and are willing to carry the extra weight, it's a great camera in almost any price range.

DC
post #20 of 27
and to give you an idea of price, the trv-900's are still selling USED for around $1000.00 on ebay.
post #21 of 27
We have the GS-400 3 cdd and a Cannon IS2.

These two simple set ups get great pictures and video.

Go 3 ccd in the snow and get a camara that allows you some control. Set your white balance on every shot or you will get the blue snow effect.

We could chat for hours on the subject. Check out my video loop at the link below.
post #22 of 27
Nice to hear from the pro. Basically confirming the same camera.
post #23 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan
and to give you an idea of price, the trv-900's are still selling USED for around $1000.00 on ebay.
Found a couple for less .One buy now with many extras for 875. The secondary market might be a good place to look or one of these since i don't want to spend 1700 for one

I looked at product reviews and they really speak highly of this one.
post #24 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ
Too unvbelieveable.
The lowest sellers have the crappiest ratings i have ever seen.
Most had review titles, that said DON'T BUY FROM THESE CROOKS
Back to the starting point for me
Cirques link has best price so far for a recommended seller, 529, for the 300 and 699 for the 500
679 for the 500 i meant to write. This seems the best deal so far and the 300 would work fine i am sure if i were to settle for it. But 150 extra for a nice camera. That seems like the smartest deal
post #25 of 27
Just say no to Sony. Any company that is willing to put software onto your computer without your permission and obfuscate it so that you can neither find it nor remove it doesn't deserve my business.

Sorry, but that really frosts me! Even when I use a Mac and it didn't directly effect me. YMMV.
post #26 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
Just say no to Sony. Any company that is willing to put software onto your computer without your permission and obfuscate it so that you can neither find it nor remove it doesn't deserve my business.

Sorry, but that really frosts me! Even when I use a Mac and it didn't directly effect me. YMMV.
That is pretty sleazy , and then to be smug about it.
We are constantly under attack as far as our computers are concerned,they don't need my money .
.I really like Sony products but i think also they are overrated and if you look and study the market you can find damn good alternatives
post #27 of 27
GarryZ, I agree. There was a time when I was a Sony fan, but they've lost this guy, in likelihood forever. If they had owned up to it and done the right thing, they might have kept me, but not the way they handled it. No way. I wouldn't trust another Sony CD again ever.
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