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Goggle's that never FOG UP... (what do u guys recommed) - Page 2

post #31 of 58
The Smith turbo goggles my husband had had the best luck with for dirtbiking does not have a double lense.
I believe that could be the difference for you.
Some how you are getting moisture between the lens'
post #32 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ
You got a separation between the layers that make up your lens. Look carefully and you should be able to find it. Or you got a crack ,which you would have noticed already.

You need a replacement lens or new goggle
thanks bud.... I looked closely and the seal on the lens is not set properly...ill return them later on in the week..

thank you all very much
post #33 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xtremity
thanks bud.... I looked closely and the seal on the lens is not set properly...ill return them later on in the week..

thank you all very much
The same thing happenned to me but then i had a fine face plant and cracked them right in the middle. I used mine all season so i got enough use out if them
post #34 of 58
Fog in between the lenses is a problem any goggle can have. Personally, I have fogged ever goggle I've ever owned, including Smith Turbo's. For me though, I have a "hot head", I throw a lot of heat from my face when I ski. For me, I have had success with Smith and Oakley (I NEVER used to be able to wear Oakley's) since I got a helmet. However, it should be noted that the helmet I got has a TON of vents on the top of the head, and I Duct taped the front vents and sliding vent on my helmet, so no direct heat went through. Beyond that, I try to vent my face when I feel heat starting up. But, when you lift the goggles, you have to make sure that they "split" the ridge of the helmet, so air can flow around em.

For me, changing a few habit's has allowed me to wear goggles, whereas for years I wore glasses becuase goggles would always fog.
post #35 of 58

It Works for The Hermanator

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xtremity
thanks bud.... I looked closely and the seal on the lens is not set properly...ill return them later on in the week..

thank you all very much
I was a fog problem-child for years... been strapping the Carrera Kimerik to my dome for 3 years now with ZERO problems. When I heard that "The Hermanator" wore the Kimerik for his fog problems, that was good enough for me.: They have adjustable front vent portals that work great.

They also fit my K2 Ultra helmet very well.
post #36 of 58
Smith Prodigy, all the way. Get the sensor mirror lens for low-light conditions, and the platinum red lens for bright conditions, and platinum grey for in between.
post #37 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manus
However, it should be noted that the helmet I got has a TON of vents on the top of the head, and I Duct taped the front vents and sliding vent on my helmet, so no direct heat went through.

I'm not sure if I'm reading this wrong, but if you have taped over the vents on your helmet, then your head will pump more heat through your face. Open up the vents, and let your body pump the heat out through the top of your head, not your face.
post #38 of 58
I really like Smith Prodigy or regulators but a lot of people with fogging issues are because they have their hair or a hat or something under the goggles. Also, taking them off and putting on your head is also a problem. Once you put them on, they stay on and keep anything that wicks moisture away from the foam
post #39 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wear The Fox Hat
I'm not sure if I'm reading this wrong, but if you have taped over the vents on your helmet, then your head will pump more heat through your face. Open up the vents, and let your body pump the heat out through the top of your head, not your face.
I only taped over the front vents, all of the other vents are on the top and were left unobstructed (including making sure that the padding did not interfere), even with the couple taped over vents I think my helmet still has about 10 vents on top.
post #40 of 58
Thread Starter 

Gdogg, 

 

this was 6 years ago..lol crap I've been here too long..

post #41 of 58

Hi Xtremity,

 

What do you mean this was 6 years ago?

 

Thus far I have tried everything to stop my fogging issue even got a hammer helmet with integrated visor, didn't work so well and cost a few notes :-(

 

Heat seems to make sense to me!  Keep the temperature above the dew point and you don't get fog?  Is that not the logic for the double skin lens i.e. air gap insulation to reduce chilling of inner lens?

 

I'm open minded just need to get it sorted as its killing me - ruined my trip to whistler last year.

 

Cheers,

G

post #42 of 58

What he means is that you resurrected a thread that had been dead for 6 years to post what looks like spam for a product that doesn't yet exist.   So how did your buddy get a pair of these, is he an investor? 

post #43 of 58

Hi Mycyclist,

 

Sorry bit slow of the mark there...I now see the date of the last post!  No my buddy's not an inventor he works in a University Enviromental Test Chamber lab where the prototype for these goggles was being tested.  Apparently the tests showed that these new goggs cleared fog in less than 60 sec where the established brand, a goggle with fans in them only partially cleared and this took over ten minutes.

 

Its an interesting idea, not sure why it hasn't been done before!  The fans only seem to be part of the solution i.e. humidity control.  In fact from my understanding you only really need a heated lens which maintains the temperature above the dew point - I guess I should know this stuff being a nuclear design engineer specialising in heat transfer.

 

I have tried loads of things but I always get bad fogging - I might buy a pair if they are not too much, already spent loads on this problem with no success.

 

Cheers,

G

 

 

post #44 of 58

There is a good deal more to the problem and the solution than heat alone.  That's the short answer.  Although heat can be used to help stack the deck in the users favor against fogging with everything else being precisely equal.  The biggest problem with goggles however, is that everything else is never precisely equal when skiing.  Heat can be useful, but it cal also cause serious and permanent damage to certain ophthalmic lens materials - even in small amounts.  Huge swings in effectiveness and/or potential damage can occur depending on the manner in which heat is applied, how evenly it is distributed, the thermal conductive nature of the different polymers used in the construction of the goggle's optics itself, and the atmospheric conditions and weather environment in which the goggle is being used.

 

Can you shed any more light on the precise nature of the heating element in the elk-sport design?

 

B~

post #45 of 58

Hi B,

 

Not sure about the materials in the goggs lens or the method in which heat is applied to the lens, I'll see if I can find out.  All I know was that the heating element was not visible on the lens.

 

Cheers,

G

post #46 of 58

Sounds good.  Certainly am interested in whatever you're able to find.

 

Cheers!

 

Bri~

post #47 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lostboy View Post

I've had various models of Smith, Uvex and Scott.
I've finally more or less settled on Scott. They simply tend to be less expensive.

A Friend of mine has who wears glasses has the Turbo Fan Smith's and loves them. To me the Scott's seem to work every bit as well as the Smith's and Uvex which is most of the time.

If I'm really sweating all goggles that I've owned fog up. Simply pulling them away from your face until the fog dissipates works fairly well. Short of spending over $100 for the Turbo Fan, if there is a magic bullet goggle out there I haven't discovered it yet.


I've basically given up on ALL goggles in warm humid weather.  Peeps here seem to like Smith Turbos.  I have Smith Turbo fan goggles which stink

and have fogging problems most of the time. Not just the goggle but mostly with my eyeglasses inside.

 

Goggles only work in temps below 20 deg F.   If I remove the helmet and wear a light knit hat then the goggle may work to 28 deg F. Fog if warmer.

 

Body heat ot a hot face or head,as being discussed here seems to be much of the problem. I don't see much I wish to do here.

 

It may look stupid but  a wide rimed ball cap or visor under a knit cap to keep warm wet snow/rain off my glasses is the only solution I've found

during snow in 30 years.   

Maybe contact lens?

 

post #48 of 58

is it the goggle that is fogging or the glasses?

 

Are you using anti-fog products on your glasses? (smith wipe is very good)

post #49 of 58

Just an update: Since I switched to new smaller glasses under my goggles, the fogging problem I have is much less of a problem.  (on the other hand if I forget the goggles or have to take them off, I have to ski much, much more slowly.

 

Also, it's not just hats and helmets, it's all your clothing; the worst fogging day for me was one where I was dressed for -40 but it was really only about -20 F.   If you can avoid sweating too much it helps.

 

Heated lenses should work, just like those heated windshields in cars, less chance of a stone chip too, but still will likely prove too expensive, IMHO.

post #50 of 58

I can create an anti-glare ophthalmic Rx lens for any member that will be about as close to fog-proof as it gets - period.  If it's your regular glasses or your goggle's Rx insert that is the main problem, that it easily overcome.  Moreover, a custom digitally generated, free-form, wrap compensated lens is a perfect fit in a goggle.  The quality of vision is phenomenal and for any who can't or don't like to wear contacts, it's another means to excellent ski vision.  Stop into the shop anytime you're in town.

 

Cheers!

 

Brian~

post #51 of 58

I'm currently having issues with my contacts! I have never been skiing with my glasses can only image its a nightmare!  Can you get prescription goggles?

 

Uilleann - I believe that the ELKs use ITO as the heating element and have two micro fans located in them with diffusers.

post #52 of 58

Does anyone use cat crap anymore?

post #53 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by greenlander View Post

Does anyone use cat crap anymore?


 

I think i stated this previously in this thread,, my position is if you're putting this on your snow goggles that came with permanent factory anti-fog you just ruined them (or at a minimum made them less effective).  All modern snow goggles say on the box never use any anti-fog on them.

 

So then it's just for glasses under goggles or your other optics (scopes/binos, maybe swim goggles, safety glasses/ non-snow goggles).

 

It's $10, which is kinda pricey, the $2 smith wipe seems like a better deal and easier to use

post #54 of 58

Both

  Especially the glasses. I've tried the Smith No-Fog cloth & Cat Crap etc with no luck.

Also running the fan for 2 or 3 minutes after each run in damp weather.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post

is it the goggle that is fogging or the glasses?

 

Are you using anti-fog products on your glasses? (smith wipe is very good)



 

post #55 of 58

I don't see me trying the cat crap option! Guess I'm just not that hard core :-)

 

I just feel that coatings aren't good enough they seem to be overwhelmed with the moisture we generate when skiing hard or walking up the mountain!

post #56 of 58

MDSkier - where in MD are you located?  (feel free to PM).  My family is all back there (married a couple years back up in Havre de Grace at the lighthouse actually, next to Aberdeen), and I might be able to direct you to a good optician in your area that I happen to know.  You need to address the Rx lens fog issue first, and then look at the goggle and what's causing the secondary lens fog issues.  In some scenarios, there is nothing that will eliminate all fogging 100%, 100% of the time.  But you can do much to minimize the potential both on the Rx lens (probably easier there actually), and the goggle itself.

 

Stay in touch

 

Bri~

post #57 of 58

One more important factor about anti-fog that I was thinking of.

 

 I think you need to be careful to define what "fogging" is.

 

On my glasses, if I don't use anti-fog, they actually fog up, that is white effect you get when you breath on a clean piece of cold glass.

 

However, with anti-fog, when I breath on it, they don't "fog up".   However, if I keep breathing on it, eventually enough moisture condenses and forms a film of water, then actual drops of water show up, both of which begin to blur the vision.  But this isn't a fog in that it is white/opaque, it is water film then eventually water drops.  

 

I think if you're surfaces are at this stage and not really "fogging" but condensing, then it's moisture control that is your issue and no amount of surface treatment is going to help.  It could be just the makeup of your particular set of glasses is just prone to condensation (maybe the specific material of your glasses (glass, polycarb, coatings might all have an effect).

 

If you are getting actual FOG and not droplets or water film, then I think yes a surface treatment like smith wipe or the catcrap (or new lenses if you've wiped away the snow goggle's factory coating) is going to help.

 

If you aren't getting fog, but excessive condensation overwhelming the anti-fog and forming water film/droplets; then it's not anti-fog you're seeking but factors to reduce the overall amount of moisture produced.

post #58 of 58

Fogging is actually microscopic droplets of water.  But they are so small that they appear as a translucent white film on the interior of a lens/window etc.  The mechanism that anti-fog treatments of any form generally implement, is a one that helps to overcome the inherent surface tension of water, which then turns the micro beads into a flat sheet of water.  Changing the surface from billions of micro droplets into a single sheet doesn't eliminate the water or condensation, but it does change the optical properties and allows clear vision through the water almost as if it wasn't there.

 

To a point.

 

You're absolutely correct in mentioning that if you have so much moisture that you're getting full sized drops and it's running down the inside of the goggle lens, then there is no lens nor treatment process that will offer relief.  You'll have to change other aspects of your skiing set-up then, and improve ventilation while reducing or removing (if possible) the main source(s) of moisture.

 

Cheers

 

Bri~

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