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Board Size Help Needed

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Alright Guys,

I'm thinking of buying a K2 Zeppelin board as I plan to undertake a instructor training course in New Zealnd over the summer so I need the board to allow me to progress too a much higher standard and progress with me. From the research I've done and my own knowledge (lack of) I think the 158 would be my best bet. I weigh approximately 137 pounds and I'm 6 feet tall (183cm). Being resonably tall and yet quite light, deciding what sized board is proving difficult. Any help would be much appreciated.

Regards,

thesweney
post #2 of 14
158 sounds like a good length. Width is more important than length when choosing a snowboard. With your feet at your preferred stance angles, your toes and heels should hang over the edges slightly, but not so much that they will drag when you carve.
post #3 of 14
Im about the same Height and Weight, Im about 5'11, and 145-150, and i ride a 158, and it works great. Good size. you'll be happy, and as long as you don't have really big feet, you should be fine.
post #4 of 14
Welcome to Epic.
I'm not the person to advise on this but I'm sure there are some here with great input. Hope you feel at home!
post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks for your help guys, think I'll go with the 158. I've heard/read some good things about the Zeppelin board, does anyone else ride one? What are their thoughts?
post #6 of 14
Why the Zeppelin specifically? Is this the only board you're able to proform?

Also, what type of emphasis do you want to have for your riding? What size are your feet?

The Zeppelin is basically a freestyle board. Aside from instructing, are you going to have a freestyle focus?

You would be at the bottom end of the weight range for the 158, you generally don't want to do that. Can you demo different lengths? I'd try the 156 and even the 151 or 153, even at your height. If you can't demo and your instructor course does not have significant riding off the groomed (including park in the definition of groomed) I'd actually lean towards the shortest length, as you'll be able to get it to work much more easily at medium to low speeds.
post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 
I was thinking of the Zeppelin because I've heard it's a good all mountain board. The course takes into consideration freestyle, off piste and pisted boarding, so I need a board that will perform to a reasonable standard in all of these. My feet are 9/9.5. From what I've heard/read the zeppelin ticks these boxes. Would you suggest otherwise?

As for the length I've been reccomended to get a longer board (158) because I need the board to allow me to progress, and according to the company that runs the course a shorter can cause problems with this. Also apparantly their will be problems with a shorter board (151 & 153) when going off piste as with the surface area of the board combined with my 137 pounds would just result in me sinking into the powder. Again what are your thoughts, I'm willing at accept I might bo completely wrong?

Regards,

thesweeney


Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook
Why the Zeppelin specifically? Is this the only board you're able to proform?

Also, what type of emphasis do you want to have for your riding? What size are your feet?

The Zeppelin is basically a freestyle board. Aside from instructing, are you going to have a freestyle focus?

You would be at the bottom end of the weight range for the 158, you generally don't want to do that. Can you demo different lengths? I'd try the 156 and even the 151 or 153, even at your height. If you can't demo and your instructor course does not have significant riding off the groomed (including park in the definition of groomed) I'd actually lean towards the shortest length, as you'll be able to get it to work much more easily at medium to low speeds.
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by thesweeney
I was thinking of the Zeppelin because I've heard it's a good all mountain board. The course takes into consideration freestyle, off piste and pisted boarding, so I need a board that will perform to a reasonable standard in all of these. My feet are 9/9.5. From what I've heard/read the zeppelin ticks these boxes. Would you suggest otherwise?

As for the length I've been reccomended to get a longer board (158) because I need the board to allow me to progress, and according to the company that runs the course a shorter can cause problems with this. Also apparantly their will be problems with a shorter board (151 & 153) when going off piste as with the surface area of the board combined with my 137 pounds would just result in me sinking into the powder. Again what are your thoughts, I'm willing at accept I might bo completely wrong?

Regards,

thesweeney
It's a directional twin, which means it's not ideal for sustained powder riding as opposed to hitting booters, but it does tick the all-mountain freestyle boxes. The waist is marginal but if you have a wide stance should should be ok in terms of width.

You need to define progression. A shorter board is generally less stable, but easier to spin, easier to manage on rails, and generally easier to flex. On the 158 you will need to ride faster to get the board to perform as intended, in some cases this can be good but it may be too much board for you. Unless you always ride really fast, a good rule of thumb is to avoid being on the lower end of the board's intended weight range, particularly if the board is already one of the stiffer boards a manufacturer makes.
post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 
By progression I mean I'm currently an intermediate, and on the course I will be boarding 5 days a week for 16 weeks (the whole New Zealand season). I've got no problems finding the board a bit if a beast at the start of the course and growing into it, I would hate to buy a board and be unable to progress as the board is restricting me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook
It's a directional twin, which means it's not ideal for sustained powder riding as opposed to hitting booters, but it does tick the all-mountain freestyle boxes. The waist is marginal but if you have a wide stance should should be ok in terms of width.

You need to define progression. A shorter board is generally less stable, but easier to spin, easier to manage on rails, and generally easier to flex. On the 158 you will need to ride faster to get the board to perform as intended, in some cases this can be good but it may be too much board for you. Unless you always ride really fast, a good rule of thumb is to avoid being on the lower end of the board's intended weight range, particularly if the board is already one of the stiffer boards a manufacturer makes.
post #10 of 14
Boards can restrict you, but not the way you're thinking. It sounds like you're assuming longer and stiffer is naturally better, so a better rider will be on a longer, stiffer board, other things being equal. Instead you want to select the right tool (incuding flex, length, template, etc.) for the job. One thing you might want to do is look at what some pro riders who are roughly your weight ride for their park and all-mountain setup. On average they'll be considerably shorter than 158 these days, but ymmv.

Sounds like a great summer, enjoy!
post #11 of 14
An echo to CT's comment:

Lighter people + stiffer boards = stunted progress. A wider stance has the same effect as a stiffer board = it's harder to bend the board. It's much easier to tone down high end riding to match a board's limitations than it is to learn high end riding when you are limited in getting the board to perform. It's a kind of a chicken and egg problem: it's hard to learn ride good until you learn the moves to bend the board and it's hard to learn to bend the board until you ride good. If you have a board that is too stiff for you, you will find that you have no egg to grow the chicken from.

I don't know anything about the Zeppelin. Just be careful not to get a board that is on the stiff side and expect to grow into it. Go into a shop and get them to show you the stiffest and the noodliest boards they have, flex them yourself and then make sure that you get something in between.
post #12 of 14
congrats on the K2 zeplin 158!!
post #13 of 14

NZ Instructors Course

Quote:
Originally Posted by thesweeney
...I plan to undertake a instructor training course in New Zealnd over the summer...
That sounds awesome and I'm interested to hear more about it. Would you be able to post a link to more info about the course?



Thanks.
B-2
post #14 of 14

weight, not height

yo. i bought my first two boards based on the same incorrect assumption. however, it is weight, not height, that will most accurately determine the right board for you. the key is turning and keeping your edge, and the longer boards take more weight to turn. i'm about 6'2" and 150 lbs. and i ride a Ride Theory 154 and a K2 disciple 155. this length is perfect for someone around this size, for an easily controlled ride that has enough flex to still do sick butters. but if you're focusing more on b.c. riding than doing all-mountain, then a longer board will be better.
regardless, i highly recommend demo-ing boards before you buy. the only way to ensure that a board is right for you is to try it out. you can do it everywhere, and it could save you a lot of money. enjoy the new ride!
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