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Post pics of your MTB's! - Page 2

post #31 of 58
post #32 of 58
28 lbs for the Mount Vision (thats the pedal up hill bike)

37ish(iirc) for the Quake (it does have 2 front rings so it can be pedalled but it is supposed to be a "north shore/whistler type park bike) in my case it will be a chairlift/truck shuttle bike with a little more versatility than a DH bike...
post #33 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by waxman
37ish(iirc) for the Quake (it does have 2 front rings so it can be pedalled but it is supposed to be a "north shore/whistler type park bike) in my case it will be a chairlift/truck shuttle bike with a little more versatility than a DH bike...
OK it comes in at $120 a pound.

Hmm, my 24 pound. Kona HT comes in at $90 per pound.
post #34 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by waxman
37ish(iirc) for the Quake (it does have 2 front rings so it can be pedalled but it is supposed to be a "north shore/whistler type park bike) in my case it will be a chairlift/truck shuttle bike with a little more versatility than a DH bike...
Ya know, and this is just my opinion, if your bike is to heavy to ride up hill, it's too heavy, period. Personally, I can't really support the downhill/freeride movement. I think, and I've seen where, lots of dh/fr riders ride irresponsibly. I think bigger, heavier bikes with ungodly amounts of travel just encourage this. DH/Freeriders do WAY more damage to trails than "regular" mtb bikers, they don't like to yield the right of way to uphill riders, much less hikers and horseback riders. From what I've seen, they are way more likley to ride off trail and ride too fast for conditions. If you have to wear a full face helmet and body armor, you're going to fast (not for yourself, but for those around you (like me)) It's all about a few bad apples I know. I also know that the same analogy can be made for skiing, but you'll never convince me that on a bike, you shouldn't earn your vertical...

L
post #35 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lonnie
Ya know, and this is just my opinion, if your bike is to heavy to ride up hill, it's too heavy, period. Personally, I can't really support the downhill/freeride movement. I think, and I've seen where, lots of dh/fr riders ride irresponsibly. I think bigger, heavier bikes with ungodly amounts of travel just encourage this. DH/Freeriders do WAY more damage to trails than "regular" mtb bikers, they don't like to yield the right of way to uphill riders, much less hikers and horseback riders. From what I've seen, they are way more likley to ride off trail and ride too fast for conditions. If you have to wear a full face helmet and body armor, you're going to fast (not for yourself, but for those around you (like me)) It's all about a few bad apples I know. I also know that the same analogy can be made for skiing, but you'll never convince me that on a bike, you shouldn't earn your vertical...

L
My bias is on the XC side myself. And I hate heavy bikes.

I share your concerns. I have no issues with bike riders of any discipline as long as they are respectfull of other users.
post #36 of 58
Ride what you like, just keep in mind that the Origins of Mt Biking is a bunch of wahoos pushing 45lbs 'clunkers' up Mt Tam so they could race back down. Sort of like freeriding, wouldn't you agree?
post #37 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom
Ride what you like, just keep in mind that the Origins of Mt Biking is a bunch of wahoos pushing 45lbs 'clunkers' up Mt Tam so they could race back down. Sort of like freeriding, wouldn't you agree?
Pushing is ok (at least you're burning calories). Riding on a lift or in a truck, do what you want, but you won't see me doing it.

I guess my real problem with this is when I see the park types try to take that activity to areas that aren't "designed" for it. Like riding on "natural" features. Rock, I don't have too much problem with that. Vegetation, is a different story. Bombing OVER regular MTB trails (which I've seen), I've got a BIG problem with that one....

L
post #38 of 58
Lonnie,

A number of years ago, I did Killington by lift. We took all the tight single track down, and it took something like 3 hours to get down. I love climbing and techie XC stuff, but I have to admit, it was fun doing some of that. I don't think I'd get as much out of bombing the fall line, but gravity assisted XC can be fun too. Plus, it made it a lot more appealing to the wives who don't ride much.
post #39 of 58
No pics

Trek 6000 vintage pre-married (1992).
Purchased used from bike shop rental while on vacation in Nantucket with the future bride.

It serves as 'Old Paint' bringing me back and forth to work for the last three years.

Last summer, my wife tried to park the car with the bike mounted on the roof. More damage to the car than the bike. When I brought it into the shop, I found that this happens a lot more than you would expect. It didn't really make me feel any better.

I just can't put a bullet in it.

Also a Trek 8000ZR (The ZR stands for really frikin light) just purchased this spring - It was a successful tax season.
post #40 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Also a Trek 8000ZR (The ZR stands for really frikin light) just purchased this spring - It was a successful tax season.
Sorry to be a nitpicking PITA, but ZR refers to the ZR9000 alloy used for the frame, rather than the "alpha aluminum" used on lesser models.
post #41 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lonnie
From what I've seen, they are way more likley to ride off trail and ride too fast for conditions. If you have to wear a full face helmet and body armor, you're going to fast (not for yourself, but for those around you (like me))
Sounds like a complaint gapers make about ski racers/experts. Think about what your mental response would be if some newb skier told you that you were going too fast b/c you could carve between people or huck a cliff.

Ridiculous statement, IMNSHO. Freeriding is incredibly dangerous, but I personally enjoy jumping off of smaller stuff.
post #42 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lonnie
Ya know, and this is just my opinion, if your bike is to heavy to ride up hill, it's too heavy, period. Personally, I can't really support the downhill/freeride movement. I think, and I've seen where, lots of dh/fr riders ride irresponsibly. I think bigger, heavier bikes with ungodly amounts of travel just encourage this. DH/Freeriders do WAY more damage to trails than "regular" mtb bikers, they don't like to yield the right of way to uphill riders, much less hikers and horseback riders. From what I've seen, they are way more likley to ride off trail and ride too fast for conditions. If you have to wear a full face helmet and body armor, you're going to fast (not for yourself, but for those around you (like me)) It's all about a few bad apples I know. I also know that the same analogy can be made for skiing, but you'll never convince me that on a bike, you shouldn't earn your vertical...

L
You bring up horses, are you against horses? They do WAY more damage to trails than any DH'ers out there. Every spring they ride the trails while they are still wet and the holes and divots last all summer long. Not to mention the shi t they leave around every corner.

As far as the rest of your statement, I think it'll pull more weight when you spend a whole season sans lifts. Long live long travel.
post #43 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by zion zig zag
You bring up horses, are you against horses? They do WAY more damage to trails than any DH'ers out there. Every spring they ride the trails while they are still wet and the holes and divots last all summer long. Not to mention the shi t they leave around every corner.

As far as the rest of your statement, I think it'll pull more weight when you spend a whole season sans lifts. Long live long travel.
Horses on Sierra trails/jeep roads=a mix of beach sand and manure. Add to that flies and that fresh "piney" : scent.
post #44 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by zion zig zag
As far as the rest of your statement, I think it'll pull more weight when you spend a whole season sans lifts. Long live long travel.
Ok,

Since I've been pressed, I'm not really against ANY users. I just think all uses need to think about their impacts and actions on all other users. You have to admit this doesn't happen. In all honesty, I don't really have as much trouble with DH riding "in bounds" on lifts and in parks than I have with vehicle shuttles. I'm also not naive enough to think that all of these uses weather it be hiking, "regular" mtb, DH mtb's, horses or ORV's all have some degree of impact (I've kinda listed them in reverse order of my perceived impact). I guess it comes down not to the activity, but where folks choose to participate in this activity. For example I was out riding last year I think in American Fork Canyon and was passed on an uphill by the same 2-3 guys 3 or 4 times on a 600' climb (honestly, I was amazed they could get that many laps in). Everytime the came by us, somebody (either them or us) about biffed. I just didn't think that trail was the right one to go balls to the wall on. Too much uphill traffic. Yes this same trail is open to ORV's and horses, and to be honest the ORV's have done more damage than the DH bikes. I've seen similar activity in Little Cottonwood canyon on the pipeline trail. DH bikers bombing by hikers and other bikers. Again, it's about a few bad apples.

I guess to me, I enjoy the uphill technical riding way more than the downhill stuff, so I'm naturally prejudice on the matter. If it works for you great, but follow the rules of the trail and be courteous to others (when I say "you" I mean all trail users no matter what they ride). I know it's stupid to lump a group of people together based on the actions of a few, but from my experience, it's the DH mtb's that are least likely to not respect other users out there. Keep the long travel bikes, but the attitude that "it's all about speed, and we don't want to slow down for anybody" has got to go (not saying you have that attitude, but you have to admit it's out there). If you take that attitude away, then the "need" for super long travel aslo decrease a bit (at least on "multi use" trails).

With all of that said, given sharing a trail with a DH mtb or a dirt bike, that's a no brainer. I'll take the DH bike...

L
post #45 of 58
I should probably take a picture of my bike, but I don't have one.

2002 Gary Fischer Sugar 2+
This bike isn't sold as a fame-only, but I got one that way when someone got a replacement for one they broke taking drops (this bike is not meant for doing drops), but decided to get something stronger and sold the new frame on MTBR.

The frame is a green to gold that changes depending on the light
  • Marz MXC fork (red)
  • Mavic X317 rims with XT hubs
  • XT drive train (cannibalized off my old K2 Proflex) (BB, derails, levers, shifters)
  • Avid Mechanical disks with a 7" rotor up front and 6" in the back
  • Easton Monkey Bars 2" riser
  • Chris King head set (red)
  • red cable housings to match the other red on the bike
  • Crank Brothers Candy SL pedals
post #46 of 58
Probably needs it's own thread (or to be at MTBR), but why is it that dog owners are required to pick up after their dogs, but equestrians aren't required to at least remove those 10 lb piles of poop from the trail??: :
post #47 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH
Probably needs it's own thread (or to be at MTBR), but why is it that dog owners are required to pick up after their dogs, but equestrians aren't required to at least remove those 10 lb piles of poop from the trail??: :
Cowboys carry guns.
post #48 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by SNPete
Cowboys carry guns.
Different frame of reference, and very valid for someone from Yosemite. I live in the DC 'burbs, where equestrians are, for the most part, snobbish eliteists who think that because they are wealthy and own horses, that they have more rights and less responsibility than the rest of us. These are the same people that drive BMWs like jackasses. The ones that don't drive BMWs, are the overly spoiled children of those who do. (stereotype?? who, ME? ). Those kids wouldn't be caught dead ona horse with a western saddle. They're either into jumping or dressage.:
post #49 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH
Different frame of reference, and very valid for someone from Yosemite. I live in the DC 'burbs, where equestrians are, for the most part, snobbish eliteists who think that because they are wealthy and own horses, that they have more rights and less responsibility than the rest of us. These are the same people that drive BMWs like jackasses. The ones that don't drive BMWs, are the overly spoiled children of those who do. (stereotype?? who, ME? ). Those kids wouldn't be caught dead ona horse with a western saddle. They're either into jumping or dressage.:
They ride those funny little saddles and wear those puffy pants?

It is quite true that many if not most people who own their own horses and ride in the Sierras do carry weapons. For a variety of good reasons. Some are hunters. Some are guides (who would be negligent if they did not carry a weapon). Some are actual cowboys running cattle. Bear and mtn lions can be an issue. And other reasons.

Truth be told, the cowboys and the guides are the friendlyist people you could hope to meet.

A different frame of referrence indeed!
post #50 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by SNPete
They ride those funny little saddles and wear those puffy pants?
DING DING DING *sigh* :

Don't forget the cute little black helmets and riding crops. And their horses are *shiny* :

I'd LOVE to see some big dude in flanel, denim and dirty boots, with a cowboy hat, rifle and lasso trotting though our trail system. He'd scare the bejeezus out of the local equestrians.
post #51 of 58

Roadie Crashes Fat Tire Party!!!

hey everybody, where's the beer?

AND THE PICTURES?

post #52 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryan
hey everybody, where's the beer?

AND THE PICTURES?
The MTB thread was started because the roadies were posting pictures of their bikes on their own thread. Scat!... get outa here!... go back home!
post #53 of 58
damn roadies. all the same.
post #54 of 58
Thread Starter 
Nice bontrager tires ryan (damn I'm good)
post #55 of 58
post #56 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars

Here Ryan, this is for you!
post #57 of 58
Composite all the way...............

post #58 of 58
That bike looks a little scary. In a Holloweenish sort of way.
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