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Sailors - fast boats! - Page 2

post #31 of 57
I owned Thistle#2045 for 27 years. Talk about exciting sailing. No decking, weighing only 515 pounds for this 17ft overpowered with VERY tender round chined planing hull which at one time was considered an Olympic class and for several years was the fastest small sailboat, hiking out and flying along with the rails just two inches above the water and disaster looming, rewarding the slightest mistake with a boat full of water. Every bit as exciting as jumping into Corbets on an iffy day.

....Ott
post #32 of 57
One of my fellow sailing instructors is hot for Thistles. She is saving up for one.

I just missed out on a Soling. They wanted $600 for it including the trailer. We called at noon on the day the ad went in the paper, but they had sold it by 9am. I was going to go halves with another sailing instructor. Oh well. ^%$&*$!!!!

We are hoping the sale falls through. It has all the parts and we have all the tools, too bad.
post #33 of 57
We sold our Thistle when I was 68 and it was getting too much for us to step the mast every time and take it down at the end of the day, though we did it for 27 years...

I really hated to see her go because I had fitted that baby out with the best, ball bearing traveler, Harken ratchet blocks for the jib sheets, and swivel cleats for the centerboard and the Cunningham, 4 inch Harken block fancy swivel cleats for the main sheet, the one that opens a bit with down pressure for fine adjustments, bailers at the bottom of the hull and in the transom, spinnaker bags, the works.

I paid $1600 to buy it and got $2000 when I sold it after 27 years though it was worth more with all the improvements I put into it, but the guy I sold it to had been crewing on a Thistle with a national champion and at the races he would drool over mine. I haven't kept up with race results but I wonder.

We bought a 26ft stink pot and have it docked on Lake Erie. We had a nice trip with it last year on the Erie Canal from Bufallo to Syracuse and next month we are doing the Trent-Severn waterway in Canada, it will be 240 mile three-week trip.

I miss sailing somewhat but my best friend has a 36ft Catalina in our marina and I mess around with that sometimes, it really is a stiff boat and trimmed right it goes like hell. Also we are thinking of making one more trip to the BVI bareboat chartering with another couple. And before you know it the snow will fly again.

...Ott
post #34 of 57
Ott, The Thistle sounds like it was a fun boat to sail. Sailing a small boat is a lot different then sailing something like that Catalina. If you have some photos of your old trusty Thistle you should post them.
post #35 of 57
>>>Sailing a small boat is a lot different then sailing something like that Catalina<<<
Actually not. Except in a small racing sloop everything happens so much faster than in a large boat. One time when we bareboated in the British Virgin Islands we got a Cal-39 with a very narrow and deep keel and she was such a sweet sailing craft I could turn her 360 degrees under sail in not much more than her own length.

I actually never took any detailed pictures of my Thistle. Neither do I have any pictures of my Corvette which I drove for eight years. It just didn't seem important at the time. Doesn't say much for a professional photographer, huh?

....Ott
post #36 of 57
Sailing is one of the things I miss about not living on the Coast. I have never sailed on any of the great lakes but understand that there are some excellent cruising to be had. I know of people with boats on the Great Salt Lake but, what can I say it just doesn't appeal to me.
I just got back from a trip to The Central Coast of Calif. Seeing the Boat on Morro bay brought back some good memories of sailing in and around San Diego.
Ott , I would be worried about sailing a deep fin keel craft. In and around reefs. I have never been to the Virgin Islands but have talked to many people who have sailed the Pacific. They say one of the biggest hazards is getting in and out of the Lagoons. Openings in the reefs can still be shallow and getting in and out can depend on the tide and sea conditions. I was partners in a Columbia 27 mark II with a fin keel. It was fun boat. They do respond to the helm and like you said keep a tight turn radius.
Anyone here ever sail on a Larger Trimaran or Cat lets say around 30 foot or so?
post #37 of 57
When we picket up that boat they gave us a rough chart with markings that showed that we couldn't go between certain islands with a seven foot draft.

...Ott
post #38 of 57
I used to race on a Cal 39 in California. It was a nice boat. We chartered a 50' sloop from Moorings out of Tortola with a fin keel and 6' draft. The BVI's are pretty well marked and easy to navigate.
post #39 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by crank
The BVI's are pretty well marked and easy to navigate.
Yeah, no charts, just the guide that tells you to turn left at the house with a copper roof and don't sail after 3 p.m.

We always charter out of Tortola but the Moorings are too pricy for us so we usually go out of Maya Cove. The BVI are such a fun and varied cruising ground and all islands are close and the runs are protected in the Sir Francis Drake Channel (not really a channel) except the long haul in the Atlantice from Virgin Gorda to Jost van Dyke (got to party at Foxys).

.....Ott
post #40 of 57
Always good for a few looks. Go up to the harbormaster in some place like Beaver Island Michigan with the Rand McNally open to Michgan and ask whereina fk you are.
post #41 of 57
Charts are overrated! My old neighbor, who may not actually have had a pilot's license, I think, used to fly his Pipercub float plane on fishing trips up to New Brunswick using a roadmap. They only flew during the day, I'm told, and used to follow the highway.
post #42 of 57
Ain't no highways on the ocean. Ain't no rocky reefs in the air. You don't have the aerial view/perspective from an altitude of 6'. You are often out in the night and in fog. On a boat, charts are essential.

On another note, I crewed on a J/30 in a local beer-can race last night. My first race in over 20 years! Had a lot of fun and took 4th out of about a dozen in our class. (Not all J's)
post #43 of 57
I use to love doing the Wednesday night Beer Can races in San Diego. Had a MarkII Columbia 27. Boat was a lot of fun to sail.
post #44 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by crank
On a boat, charts are essential.
Reminds me of the guy who often used to compete in the local PHRF races back when I was crewing on J24s. He was easily spotted from afar by the way his great bulk depressed the stern of his Soverel 33. This fellow seemingly navigated by feel or perhaps by ear. I'm sure his boat left paint marks on most of the local shallows and it was often to be seen hoisted up in the local boatyard, having parts of its keel replaced, repaired or reattached after his frequent navigational encounters. He always bounced back, so to speak, so I would guess that he, at least, was not without a sense of humor.
post #45 of 57
post #46 of 57
Another Hobie 16 guy here. I have a house outside of Bethany Beach,De. and sail in the Rehobeth bay. I installed these www.sitnsail.com which added a whole new dimension to the boat. my back no longer hurts at the end of the day
post #47 of 57
That vid of the Black Pearl is nuts!
That's the way you sail a dinghy or a J80, pick up the wave and off you go...

Thanks Gill for posting those. Made me even more bummed I missed out on my first season of competative sailing in years due to injury.
post #48 of 57
That Black Pearl video is extremely cool. Man those boats are fast! Would I want to race one across and ocean? No effn way.
post #49 of 57
Interesting thread everyone. I was a sailmaker for 6-7 years and sailed many a craft. Living on the Isle of Wight which you may know hosts Cowes week each August, I've seen some good sailing, and some dreadfull sailing! I've sailed F27s, Illusion model 12 meters (solo model J class), Redwings with the likes of Sir Brabason, Sir White andolympic medalist V. Stratton.
I sail a simple radial laser dinghy in Majorca each summer holiday but don't get as much water as I used to. I'm getting into kitesurfing but am finding it increasingly difficult with a torn knee cartlidge.

Kayaking is my curnet love, I just wish I could get a perception Caster without all the rod holders bolted on, but coming from the US I can't source one!
post #50 of 57
Burnsy I live quite close to where the kayaks are made. PM me and I will round up contact info.
post #51 of 57
A CAl 40 won first over all in the Newport Bermuda race. A freakin' CAl 40! What's that like a 40-year old design?
post #52 of 57
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crank
A CAl 40 won first over all in the Newport Bermuda race. A freakin' CAl 40! What's that like a 40-year old design?
Was 1st place determined by 1st across the line in the shortest amount of time, or was it (most likley) handicapped? My guess, without looking it up, is that they made a slow boat somewhat fast, and due to the math, it won.

I have a friend who's an occasional poster here, who races the N-B or Annap-Bermuda a lot. I can ask him how boats are placed. But I was under the impression that there are a bunch of classes, so someone has to win the Cal 40 class.
post #53 of 57
First over the line was this boat, Belle Mente, a JV66.



I can't seem to find who won on corrected time.
post #54 of 57
No, of course it wasn't first across the line. That is a big deal in a distance race like the Bermuda Race, but only a few boats really have a chance and nothing in the 40' range is gonna be there. It's first over all on a handicap and, of course first in it's class as well. There is no class just for Cal 40's it will be mixed in with boats of a similar rating or handicap. BUt for a 40-year old design that was designed around racing rules in the 60's to do that well is something.
post #55 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by crank
No, of course it wasn't first across the line. That is a big deal in a distance race like the Bermuda Race, but only a few boats really have a chance and nothing in the 40' range is gonna be there. It's first over all on a handicap and, of course first in it's class as well. There is no class just for Cal 40's it will be mixed in with boats of a similar rating or handicap. BUt for a 40-year old design that was designed around racing rules in the 60's to do that well is something.
Link for results?

Please.
post #56 of 57
post #57 of 57

Are you the guy with the Piouspuffin? If so I so want to talk to you. Could you email me back at everettwalton@yahoo.com. I have just bought a permacraft 26 and would like to talk, I'm in Alaska and the boat is in Florida.

Everett

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