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post #151 of 165
[quote=cjb]
Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpdad
3) whaaattt?? Colorado home to more excellent microbrews then any other state. Try the Hazed and Infused for example. QUOTE]

Tried a Hazed and Infused last week for the first time. It was average at best. I'd rather drink a Hop Devil IPA, Victory Brewing from Pennsylvannia.

CJB, I was mistaken. The beer I bought back east that was terrible was Hops Infusion by Weyerbacher. It was right next to the Hop Devil IPA by Victory in the store. I was back there recently and was telling my friend about it and he corrected me (I had brought the six pack to his house). He drank the Hops Infusion mixed 1:1 with bud or similar swill. I picked up a six pack of Hop Devil (right next to Hops Infusion) and it is quite tasty. I still favor the Hazed, but I wanted to acknowledged my mistake. Cheers
post #152 of 165
My most favorite thing about skiing the east is the constantly changing conditions.
The hard snow conditions, Ice, and Pow, all in a day do wonders for ones skiing abilities. When I go out west and ski the soft deep snow with the nice cornice jumps and cliffs, I truely TEAR IT UP.
I love how the east has made me a stellar, well rounded skier!
Bring a western lad who never skiid the east and watch them fumble around like newbie on our rough conditions.
Bring an eastern lad out west and watch them tear the mountain limb from limb!
post #153 of 165
1- I live in the east.
2- If you can learn to ski the snotty eastern conditions, you can ski anywhere in the world.
3- Closer to Europe than California.
4- No avalanche threats.
5- No AAS syndrome.

RW
post #154 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by connor
My most favorite thing about skiing the east is the constantly changing conditions.
The hard snow conditions, Ice, and Pow, all in a day do wonders for ones skiing abilities. When I go out west and ski the soft deep snow with the nice cornice jumps and cliffs, I truely TEAR IT UP.
I love how the east has made me a stellar, well rounded skier!
Bring a western lad who never skiid the east and watch them fumble around like newbie on our rough conditions.
Bring an eastern lad out west and watch them tear the mountain limb from limb!
Good skiing is universal. Let's see some video of you tearing it up...
post #155 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron White
2- If you can learn to ski the snotty eastern conditions, you can ski anywhere in the world.
I'd like you to ski old cascade concrete crud, please.
post #156 of 165
One more vote for the conditions... they are miserable; and it's great. The nasty conditions here really do build strong skiers - especially when it comes to racing. You learn to ski well on ice or you don't ski well. The crowds and narrow trails make you learn to control yourself. Places like Jay and MRG can give most skiers out there a decent challenge... and if thats not enough, run the Whiteface WC DH course (scary, narrow, and steep)... The east is also more home-like (for me anyway). The smaller ski areas really build a community of their own as you ski there every week during the season and get to know all the regulars. It becomes 'your' mountain, 'your' space in the lodge, and in some extreme cases 'your' trail and 'your' lift. Most times I can go ski at my home mountain(s) and run into several people I know, or oftentimes meet new people.
Later
GREG
post #157 of 165
My Favorite thing about being in Burlington:
Powder days are more appreciated
Ice makes for good technique fast
We dont get spoiled with soft snow that doesnt hurt as much
Im only 50 minutes from like 5 mountains, more if i think about it
post #158 of 165
excuses, excuses
No really, I like ice. {Ice makes for good technique fast}
I want to get injured this week.
I'm a better person for this.
I like starving because when I eat it tastes so good. {Powder days are more appreciated}
You guys and gals can come up with better.

Let's see - Summit County/Eagle County -> A-Basin, Keystone, Copper, Breck, Vail, Beaver Creek all within 50 minutes of one another. I used to drive 5+ hours to ski Vermont, now if I drive 6 hours I could ski at any off the above and Winter Park/Mary Jane (90 minutes), Steamboat (3 hours), Crested Butte, Telluride, Aspen, Aspen Highlands, Snowmass (3 hours). Even little ole Eldora beats many of the Mt's back East.

Tell us about your fav trails back east, the Mt's vibe, local scene or about the quaint towns, winding roads etc. MRG has the such a great attitude, like A-basin does out here. I'm tired of hearing about the ice and how it is such a good learning surface. Yeah right.
post #159 of 165
The Charm and history of Northern New England, its such a beautiful and magical place, even without snow.
I spent many vacations in Northern N.E. and some sparce years where even more fun than the snowiest years, (almost...)
Great little restaurants, bars, and hang-outs. Most locals are super friendly and will chat over a brew.
The food is exceptional in certain pockets, Woodstock VT, Manchester VT, Killington VT, Burlington VT, North Conway NH.
The traditional new england trails sinewing down mountains make my mouth water.
Can't wait for snow...
post #160 of 165
I like a lot of things about skiing. I like powder skiing. I like bumps. The powder skiing and the mogul skiing is usually better in the Rockies based on my limited experience, but I like powder and bumps where I find them and I find them in the east sometimes.

The only thing I found in the east that was better than what I found in the Rockies is trees. The eastern woods are a lot tighter than trees found at higher altitudes. They present a great challenge and a special freeling of being in nature away from it all. In the glades I've skied in the Rockies, I could see many turns ahead and could see nearby open slopes. At Jay Peak, I felt lost in the woods. I skied a long time without seeing anyone else or a way out. If was freezing and very windy on the lift but deep in the woods was complete calm and didn't feel cold.
post #161 of 165
I have 11 days lifetime in the East, 3 shoulder season days at Killington around business trips, one late April day in Tuckerman Ravine and a week in March when the annual ski journalist meeting was in Quebec. These days are by no means representative, but I have analyzed 25 years of daily weather data from Mt. Mansfield and have read numerous TR's from avid Eastern skiers over the past decade.

As a fellow SoCal resident, I can put Ryan's question in a familiar perspective. The areas favored by the more skilled skiers that I skied in March 2003 (Stowe, Mad River and Jay) are similar to Mt. Baldy in scale. Topography is different. Baldy is steeper, but with much wider tree spacing, so I'm inclined to agree that the Vermont trees require stronger technical skills. These areas average more snow than Baldy (250 vs. 175) so skiers who actually live in Vermont (not the NYC/Boston people for whom the commute is comparable to ours to Mammoth) can get at least as many powder days as we do in Baldy's better seasons like 1998, 2001 and 2005.

Most other eastern areas are more similar to Big Bear/Mt. High: groomed and mogul trails, terrain parks, minimal off-trail skiing and very high skier density, though several are considerably bigger. Once you get away from the northern half of Vermont and a few Quebec areas near the Gulf of St. Lawrence like Le Massif), almost no one back there gets as much as 200 inches a year of natural snow.

The problem with a westerner making a trip back there is that it must be scheduled in advance so you have little control over the conditions wou will get. The upper 10% of conditions (the powder days) is not that different from western areas that have a similar 250 inch snowfall average. It's the other end of the curve you have to worry about. With the high incidence of rain, thaw and freeze, conditions by our standards suck at least 1/3 of the time, even midwinter in Northern Vermont.

So the short answer to the question is that if you are an addicted skier like me who likes to try different experiences, you should check it out. But realistically do it when you're back there for other reasons, as the $ you spend to get there are more than to Utah, interior B.C etc. if you're just going skiing. I used this rationale also to ski a day in Australia when I was on a family vacation there in 1997.

The NY Times article was pretty good in terms of capturing the "cultural" difference between eastern and western skiers. With regard to ability, the eastern skiers who have had intense technical instruction or who ski frequently in the woods adjust to to western powder and steeps quickly. Those who are just used to eastern trail skiing do have a few things to learn when they come out here IMHO.
post #162 of 165
Tony, you've hit the proverbial nail on the head. What you say about the risk of booking an eastern ski vacation is true for this Western PA skier also. Fortunately I have the flexibility to get to VT when the weather is good. Cost is always a concern of mine so it's more realistic for me to drive 12 hours to get the goods up north then to fly 6+ to go out west (I usually have my family of 4 in tow).

The frequent freeze/thaw cycle is the ultimate killer of eastern skiing, unless you love real ice. You can find steeps, great tree runs (both natural and more open gladed areas) and if you’re lucky you can find powder although it may not be as dry and light as out west.

What's my favorite thing about skiing east? I'm near, I can get there when it's good and I can afford it.
post #163 of 165
1) Real ice forces you to learn about your edges. Transparent ice forces you to become intimate with your edges. Come back and see if you're as good as you think you are.

2) New England resorts have real towns with real history, not to mention cool white steeples on their churches. (Well, Killington excepted. And it has some reality up the road.) Out west, even once real places like Aspen, Park City, Jackson, Truckee, or Breckenridge have become tee-shirt/stale clam pasta/inspirational wildlife photo factories.

3) You can drive up after dropping your kid off at pre-school.

4) No Texans wearing mink parkas.
post #164 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by doublediamond223
Good skiing is universal. Let's see some video of you tearing it up...
I agree good skiing is universal. Which leads me to believe there are not that many truely rounded skiers out west. Just ask Dan Egan when he brought a couple prominent skiers from colorado I believe, to Sugarbush VT with him. It was a terribly icy day, a day that they were no means used to. They had trouble all over the mountain. Definately could not keep up with Dan. The thing is they ski just as good as Dan in there home state. Just not here in the east.
You have to admit that when you grow up skiing whiteface from age 3 (or should I say "iceface") like I have, you tend get extremely used to shredding on icy conditions day in and day out. When you hit a nice powder day or venture out west it becomes a field day. Ton of fun. You don't have to worry about creaming yourself on a big ice patch at 40mph unless you earn your turns and happen across a rough section.
I also would much more like to ski in the west every day. I am just not that fortunate I guess. I ski what I get and love every minute of it. I really don't care if he or she is better or worse than me. I'll ski with he or she and have a blast.
This is just what I have picked up over my 26 years of skiing and traveling. Plus skiing with friends from colorado who are great there but suck here when it is rough and complain all day long about how bad it is. Just ski it
post #165 of 165
Ski a "Blue State"
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