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MA request

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Hi all, This video is an assortment of terrains. I am mostly interested in the skiing on flatter, groomed easier terrain in this video.

I have been trying to work on my upper and lower body angulation and seperation. I see I haven't yet got it dialed but perhaps there is something I am doing preventing me from "getting it"

I am aware of some glaring flaws in some of the more challenging stuff. Damn Terradactyl wings , balance not very great, arms but am open to critisism in that area as well.

Don't hold back, I have my big boy pants on I can take it.

http://media.putfile.com/2006-ski-clips

Other video from xmas time
http://media.putfile.com/Panorama-2005
post #2 of 18
Relax and absorb the terrain with your lower body. That will improve your balancing act. Once you've conquered that your on the way to fine tuning other problematic areas. IMO. I see a strong, smooth skier fighting to get out.
post #3 of 18
Marmot,

I always knew wild animals were fearless. BTW - there are a few reasons I don't usually keep the sound on my ski videos. One of them is to get rid of the gratuitous chuckling when the victim screws up.

Anytime you see upright skiing on steep and challenging terrain, it's worth applause. I also see some very nice smoothness on the flatter terrain. In the flatter terrain I see a good balanced stance. But as the slope gets steeper, you get more crouched over and get put into the back seat easier. I'd like to see that belly button exposed to the wind more. Overall, I'd like to see more use of the ski edges to make turning happen and less use of the feet steering the skis.

On the flatter terrain we can see some slight stemming and stepping going on. This is because your weight is more centered and you are going so slow that tail pushing won't work. Although there are some different symptoms, I see the same root causes.

Here are some specific suggestions to work on:
1) Lose the backpack on steeper terrain for now. It makes your crouch worse.
2) Use your poles on steeper terrain and generally make your pole touches earlier in the turn so they can help stabilize the upper body during the edge change.
3) Practice side slips on steeper terrain with aggressive and rapid speed changes. Develop the ability to roll your skis onto new edges aggressively.
4) Railroad track turns on wide open slopes. Start on the bunny hill and work your way up to open bowls (get some pro help here to make sure you do them correctly). Apply the ski roll to making carved turns.
5) Phantom turns (see the PMTS online learning site - specifically - this exercise). Overemphasize lifting the tail and bending the tip of the inside ski versus what is demonstrated in the linked exercise. This will help keep your weight forward on steeper terrain and help get your upper body working to help your turns.
6) Strengthen your core muscles (abs, glutes and lower back) and improve your balance with a balance board or fitness ball. This will help you resist getting knocked around so much.
post #4 of 18
You're "handling" the gnarly stuff just fine, albeit with a lot of the interruption of movements commonly seen in such terrain. Looks like you rely a lot on skiing from one ski to the other rather than from one set of edges to the other. If you involved the inside ski/foot/leg more in turn initiations, you would be in better balance and smoother.

I'd suggest going to easy terrain and trying to turn while standing equally on the skis. Do everything else you're doing now, just try to FEEL the bottoms of both feet every time you start a turn.
post #5 of 18

Nice...

First video
Nice and sloppy . You ski like a typical twin tip junkey that started snowboarding 10y back and now your back on skis because its hipp and its soo much more fun than it used to be!

You are struggling with angulation, upper and lower body separation, polework, counter, inclination etc but skiing is all about having fun. Downside is that if you never really learn to ski properly you will never really get any better. Once you are bored with what you do you will go back to snowboarding. Its like me and my guitarplaying, if I had 20y ago stuck with musical theory and technique exersises lessons for only 1 year I would play 100 times better now. But its never too late.

IMHO, I think you could benefit from other tye of skis. All twin tip skiers tend to heavily depend on rotation when they turn. Maybe it has to do with the "relaxed new school atmosphere" and the fact that twin tip skiers ski backwards and sideways on rails and hardly ever turn. Just go straight down to the next jump. You for instance made some sloppy turns and then you just headded straight down and passed two other skiers in a "cool" fascion.

I dont want to rant on you because I liked your video and I like your attitude and the fact that you managed to produce such good and entertaining low-fi amateur film. No pro film can capture such inocense and pure joy. And you are a very good skier. Just need to work on issues you allredy know about.

Second moovie.
Did not watch due to domestic duties....
post #6 of 18
Twin tip skis have mount points that are farther ahead than usual.

There are fewer hurtful consequences from skiing in the back seat when using twins because the tails are so very long. The main effect is that the use of rotation and heel pushing increases.

marmot_mb, you need to get out of the back seat before you do anything else. There are points in the video where you're so far back, you're actually "popping a wheelie".

The quick and dirty solution:

Get good on a pair of snow-blades (with releasable binding of course). Carving only, no skidding allowed ever. Learn to lay trenches. Then take that back to the skis, and learn to make the shovels engage....

In the Panorama video, there was an instructor leading someone else down the hill. Compare your movement to that of the instructor -- it's hard to move that much when you're too far back.

You are getting better at a style that has dead-ends, but is ultimately very dangerous. There are fewer hurtfull consequences with the twins because you'll fall less than if you were riding a hp carver.

But, when you crash, do you usually fall backwards? Backwards falls, especially twisting ones, can pop your ACL. And the huck need not be huge..... A darn good reason to get more forwards!

Hope this helps!
post #7 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson
Looks like you rely a lot on skiing from one ski to the other rather than from one set of edges to the other. If you involved the inside ski/foot/leg more in turn initiations, you would be in better balance and smoother.

just try to FEEL the bottoms of both feet every time you start a turn.
I did take lessons this year for the very first time in almost 20 years. They allowed me to feel a real carve and some points to work on. I found I kept standing too much on the up hill ski, downhill was then hard to dis-engage from the turn.

I used to ski mostly with weight on the downhill, and my inside was slightly engaged and ready to stand on but not fully engaged. Since my lessons I think I try to use both ski's to much.

Feel the bottoms of both feet when starting a turn, Check I will try that. thanks.
post #8 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6
First video
Nice and sloppy . You ski like a typical twin tip junkey that started snowboarding 10y back and now your back on skis because its hipp and its soo much more fun than it used to be!
Sort of right, I started alpine skiing at 13, x country before that, I started snowboarding before they were "allowed" onhill and did so for about 6 years. Wanted to join the ski patrol 8 years ago but foolishly thought I wouldn't pass on board so after 6 years picked up the sticks again and have not looked back. I did pass on the board easily later that year. I ski because it is far more efficient for billy goating around and it is far more challenging.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6
You are struggling with angulation, upper and lower body separation, polework, counter, inclination etc but skiing is all about having fun. Downside is that if you never really learn to ski properly you will never really get any better. Once you are bored with what you do you will go back to snowboarding.
Struggling yes but I think baby steps were acheived this year if you saw some of my 2004 videos posted earlier this winter. Sometimes I just say screw the details and just go and have fun. but I do take improvement serious. I will always snowboard, the same as I still skateboard. It's fun, it's different and it makes me feel like a kid. But I am a "skier" and that is my main focus and I doubt that will ever change.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6
IMHO, I think you could benefit from other tye of skis. All twin tip skiers tend to heavily depend on rotation when they turn. Maybe it has to do with the "relaxed new school atmosphere" and the fact that twin tip skiers ski backwards and sideways on rails and hardly ever turn. Just go straight down to the next jump. You for instance made some sloppy turns and then you just headded straight down and passed two other skiers in a "cool" fascion.
A assumption has been made it appears that I am a new schooler LOL Yes I love skiing backwards (again a challenge and it's a new sensation) I love to jump anything and am easing myself back into it after a 5 year abscence from doing much because of being out of shape. I hate going straight, I love to turn, I do go straight but only to gain speed to make turns going faster. No harm done but I am not a park rat twin tipper, I love SL type turns the most but 8800's suck at this so I do GS and love them too.

My quiver is going to have a rather high end SL / short radius ski added for next year, thinking Contact ST11, or a Soly not sure yet. but something that turns super quick and will highlight and challenge the finer points of technique.

Mostly I love to play with terrain and use every little lip and goofy bit to have fun IE last clip of my first vid. It was just a cool looking line (see attached pic) and I figured it might make good vid. Alas I missed my last gate and bloopered a otherwise good clip. Bah well was still fun.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6
I dont want to rant on you because I liked your video and I like your attitude and the fact that you managed to produce such good and entertaining low-fi amateur film. No pro film can capture such inocense and pure joy. And you are a very good skier. Just need to work on issues you allredy know about.
Rants are fine as long as they are polite and civilized as yours was, input is appreciated, and thanks, the vid was just a slap together, my bud is the one to compliment as he seems pretty good with the cam. I know there is something hidden in there somewhere that someone on here will see and this in turn might help me get better.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e3...e/IMG_9533.jpg
post #9 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE
marmot_mb, you need to get out of the back seat before you do anything else. There are points in the video where you're so far back, you're actually "popping a wheelie".
I would so love to and I think it's better now than it was. At times I am fine but others I default back. Will try the snow blade route, have skied them before but not since this years lessons on how to carve properly.

http://media.putfile.com/2004-powder-days

this ones gross to watch sorry.
http://media.putfile.com/Opening-Day-Marmot-Basin


Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE
In the Panorama video, there was an instructor leading someone else down the hill. Compare your movement to that of the instructor -- it's hard to move that much when you're too far back.
I picked up on that when I made that vid, and afterward used it to try and make some changes. worked out kinda good for me as my video is only for shits and giggles and to help me get better. My bud is awesome for taking the time to shoot it for me.


Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE
But, when you crash, do you usually fall backwards? Backwards falls, especially twisting ones, can pop your ACL. And the huck need not be huge..... A darn good reason to get more forwards!.
I would probably have to say yes, but more of a hip check into the hill as the easiest and least painfull way of stopping once I loose ski control. Much less this year than past years for sure. I think because this year I stayed very focused in getting forward but I still get back out of bad habit when the skiing gets tougher. Bad habits are hard to break.

Hope this helps! [/quote]

Thanks for the input.
post #10 of 18

Really strong skiing...

...basically. You handle the steeps really well. Good aggression. It's just like racing, it's not enough to let the mountain come to you when you get into something gnarly, and you're doing a really good job of sticking your nose in it.

A lot of good advice from the other posters, especially re steering vs. carving. But remember that steering is a skill, and there's lot of times you have to make windshield wiper turns because that's what the terrain demands. So don't lose the steering skills, just put in some work on your carving skills.

I'd also say to think about your hands. You've definitely got a lot of activity going on, and it's not all good. One of my coaches used to say "The hands don't do much, but they can undo a lot"...namely, your balancing act. Sometimes your hands are pulling you back and to the inside. A lot of the standard advice about hands and arms makes it worse...trying to get them up or in front usually turns students into a stick figure. You've got really good flow, and you want to keep that.

I'd say (a) just keep both hands where you can see them. A way to do this is to think not of upper/lower body...you really have the torso and the legs, with the hips being the connection between them. The hips have to be a universal joint so your torso and legs can do whatever they have to. I'm not getting into the whole countering/angulation thing. It's just that one of my coaches told me to keep the hips nice and loose and everything else will fall into place. (b) There was some bumpster from Vail who wrote an article about bump skiing a couple of years ago that I really liked. One of his tips was "Elbow Diddley"...elbows out and a little higher than waist level, but hands closer together in front. Kind of the same as (a). Elbow Diddley has a way of keeping your hands disciplined without getting stiff or mechanical.

I'd also go run some gates. Running slalom in the ruts will let you use and sharpen your existing skills. Pretty soon, you'll think running slalom and skiing bumps are the same thing...which they are...
post #11 of 18
To my humble eye, something that I think will have a big payoff is to spend some time refining the elements of your turn initiation ...

Both have been said earlier: 1) pole technique, and 2) edge changes.

What I saw (in one viewing of your video, so take it for what it's worth) is a pole technique that:
- has a very distinct PLANT and push off
- reaches the hand forward and sticks the pole in the snow and then drops the hand back to the hip area
- appears to plant the pole somewhere from the middle to front of your binding and just out to the side

While watching your turns, I see:
- a big "up" movement and a hopped turn on anything steep(ish)
- an outside leg that flexes a bit less than the inside
- a distinct two-footedness
- a stance that narrows and widens at different phases of the turn

Three things to try with your poles:
1) concentrate on the swing instead of the plant ... blocking pole plants inhibit a lot of good movements (yes, they do have their time and place, but not on groomed or easier terrain)
2) keep your hands up and ahead of you at all time and let the poles swing from that position
3) try to make contact with the snow just ahead and a bit to the outside of the binding

Three things to try with your edge changes:
1) keep both feet weighted and roll feet to initiate the edge change (instead of moving UP and unweighting)
2) work feet (and legs) in unison (same width of stance, simultaneous movements) ... AND making extremely subtle adjustments throughout the course of the turn instead of just parking and riding (this might feel like ... bend the outside knee a bit more to tip the foot a bit more to apply a bit more pressure -- not weight -- to the outside ski/edge to slightly alter the turn ... etc.)
3) let the skis flatten for a second between turns ... patient/soft edge changes ... sure we still want it to happen quickly, but not to RUSH it

post #12 of 18
Marmot--I wish I could watch your video, but my little antique dial-up connection makes it all but impossible. Is there any way you could host it somewhere that would allow us old-fashioned dialupers to download and save it as a file, so we could play it from our hard drives? The site you have it on threatens to ban me for even trying!

Best regards,
Bob Barnes
post #13 of 18
Marmot - OK, I gotta ask - At about 2:33 on the first video it looks like you hit a tree! Obviously you survived, but what happened?
post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler
Marmot - OK, I gotta ask - At about 2:33 on the first video it looks like you hit a tree! Obviously you survived, but what happened?
well you see... this little section of the hill is cursed for me. Every time I ski it with someone videoing I seem to wretch in some form or another. When there is no camera I rip it and I always say to myself "if only you caught that on tape"

So this time I had a line eyed up to turn around that tree and then towards the camera in the nice open space you see. I got some speed, made the turn and the uphill tree well spun the tails of my skis downhill, I was trying to turn hard and the snow gave out, then my side / rib cage area then hit the tree full force and stopped me dead in my tracks.

The best part is unheard of me cursing and swearing trying to get released from the snowy grip of a tree well, all my weight on the tree and both ski's firmly stuck in the snow and no leverage to un-wrangle myself. About 5 minutes later I emerged, sweaty, pissed off and knowing yet again I was taped waxin out on my cursed area.

Buddy laughing just had to stay in the clip for full effect.

Thankfully I wasn't going fast and the tree simply slowed the last of my momentum looking far worse than it really was. I did have an existing pulled muscles in that area from having bronchiatis for about a month and refusing to stop skiing and hence coughed so much for so long I pulled muscles.

The tree I don't think made it worse but it didn't help and the next day I could not hardly move, but the day after........ I went skiing. Still hurts to this day but I am still coughing.

Maybe it's a good thing ski season is almost over. June skiing at Sunshine Village is a good possibility this year, leaving a few months before the fun starts again.
post #15 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes/Colorado
Marmot--I wish I could watch your video, but my little antique dial-up connection makes it all but impossible. Is there any way you could host it somewhere that would allow us old-fashioned dialupers to download and save it as a file, so we could play it from our hard drives? The site you have it on threatens to ban me for even trying!

Best regards,
Bob Barnes
Not sure what could be done about this. If you are really interested in seeing it, PM me with your email addy and I can email it to you in the smallest version I can create. 4.28 mb.
post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 
Kkaye, wow lots of good stuff there, thanks for that. Lots of it makes sense. This will get printed and stuffed into the ski coat to review on the chair on my next ski outing (hopefully this weekend)

Thanks
post #17 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiRacer55
...basically. You handle the steeps really well. Good aggression. It's just like racing, it's not enough to let the mountain come to you when you get into something gnarly, and you're doing a really good job of sticking your nose in it.
Thank you, I figure you only live once, it's only snow and I'm still young enough to heal fast, plus I love a rush.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiRacer55
I'd also say to think about your hands. You've definitely got a lot of activity going on, and it's not all good. One of my coaches used to say "The hands don't do much, but they can undo a lot"...namely, your balancing act. Sometimes your hands are pulling you back and to the inside. A lot of the standard advice about hands and arms makes it worse...trying to get them up or in front usually turns students into a stick figure. You've got really good flow, and you want to keep that.
My vids from early this year and POW 2004 my arms and hands were everywhere I really tried this year to keep them quiet and in front yet watching this vid it still happens just not all the time.

My pano vid I was trying hard then to keep my arms in check as previous vid analysis from Bears clearly stated this was a major problem for me. I would like to think it's better but It still doesn't look as smooth and effortless as some great skiers I have seen. I think the saying "less is more" is applicable.

I tried different poling techniques but old habits are hard to break, I will take your position advice and try again and again and again lol.


Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiRacer55
I'd also go run some gates. Running slalom in the ruts will let you use and sharpen your existing skills. Pretty soon, you'll think running slalom and skiing bumps are the same thing...which they are...
Can I have a note saying I'm allowed and supposed to. I sneak in gate runs whenever I can but of course the racers and the coaches don't like it and bitch me out. I wish sometimes resorts, hills would put up public gates.

Thanks for the input.
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marmot mb
Sort of right, I started alpine skiing at 13, x country before that, I started snowboarding before they were "allowed" onhill and did so for about 6 years. Wanted to join the ski patrol 8 years ago but foolishly thought I wouldn't pass on board so after 6 years picked up the sticks again and have not looked back. I did pass on the board easily later that year. I ski because it is far more efficient for billy goating around and it is far more challenging.



Struggling yes but I think baby steps were acheived this year if you saw some of my 2004 videos posted earlier this winter. Sometimes I just say screw the details and just go and have fun. but I do take improvement serious. I will always snowboard, the same as I still skateboard. It's fun, it's different and it makes me feel like a kid. But I am a "skier" and that is my main focus and I doubt that will ever change.



A assumption has been made it appears that I am a new schooler LOL Yes I love skiing backwards (again a challenge and it's a new sensation) I love to jump anything and am easing myself back into it after a 5 year abscence from doing much because of being out of shape. I hate going straight, I love to turn, I do go straight but only to gain speed to make turns going faster. No harm done but I am not a park rat twin tipper, I love SL type turns the most but 8800's suck at this so I do GS and love them too.

My quiver is going to have a rather high end SL / short radius ski added for next year, thinking Contact ST11, or a Soly not sure yet. but something that turns super quick and will highlight and challenge the finer points of technique.

Mostly I love to play with terrain and use every little lip and goofy bit to have fun IE last clip of my first vid. It was just a cool looking line (see attached pic) and I figured it might make good vid. Alas I missed my last gate and bloopered a otherwise good clip. Bah well was still fun.



Rants are fine as long as they are polite and civilized as yours was, input is appreciated, and thanks, the vid was just a slap together, my bud is the one to compliment as he seems pretty good with the cam. I know there is something hidden in there somewhere that someone on here will see and this in turn might help me get better.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e3...e/IMG_9533.jpg
nice that you took the time and posted feedback on my post. You are a good guy with your ego in the right place. Im glad I did the right assumption with you snowboard background. I have been skiing all my life and teaching for over 10y so I have a good hunch and eye for what is happening out on the mountain. People that never skied with a videocamera in their backpack and tried to capture cool skiing on tape dont know what all it involves. I think you have some really nice shots in there and with a little editing you will be able to cut away unnessesary stuff so that you get fluency in the video. Get yoruselfe the free one month demo version of Sony Vegas and start editing. PM me if you need advise. Next year you will be posting films of quality and camreaman work that will blow away this years production by miles.

Reg

Tom
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