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MA request - ssh - Page 2

post #31 of 63
I second Noodler! Thanks for the instructive explanation, with all the background on how you came to the "FIT" ...and how it would ripple out to the other effects you identified.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes/Colorado
PS--see you on Wednesday at the Basin!
So, we'll be seeing the after video on Thursday then!
post #32 of 63
Really great to see Bob back on the board. Enjoyed the 3-part analysis. Of course PSIMAN has always been something of a mentor to me.
post #33 of 63
Which provides the answer to the question: great skiers are made!
post #34 of 63
Bob, You absolutely positively amaze me. : Great Stuff.

GLAD TO HAVE YOU BACK AND POSTING!
post #35 of 63
Bob, I see ou are back in the groove, great. As I read the flow of your words I can see the actions in my mind. Thanks, and welcome back to the board...

....Ott
post #36 of 63
ssh, after that "bobble" in the first clip, I think you did a version of the "White Pass Turn" which was mentioned in a thread recently!
My $0.02: in general I think you might be stabler with a slightly wider stance, and a bit more "long leg / short leg" differentiation.
post #37 of 63
Thanks for all the great comments, folks. Very useful stuff.

I did notice one thing, though... No one asked what my intent was for these turns. Noodler noticed that they were different from my typical turns, which are much more retraction style.

Since no one asked and there's now been a lot of MA on this, does anyone care to consider what my intent might have been? This is not intended as a tease, but I think that we, as observers of skiing, often err when we assume that we know what the intent is without asking. Interesting thought, eh?

I think that's one reason that coaching racing can be so focused: the intent is very clear to both the skier and the coach. In free skiing, that is not the case at all.
post #38 of 63
BTW, weems, I just registered for the Copper Mountain PSIA-RM race clinic in May. :
post #39 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
Thanks for all the great comments, folks. Very useful stuff.

I did notice one thing, though... No one asked what my intent was for these turns.
Quote:
Originally Posted by faisasy
By Steve's request, here is a video (containing two clips) of his skiing just a few days ago at Vail...


...Intent: Free-skiing/carving.
?????
post #40 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by cgeib
?????
Interesting catch, cgeib. Faisasy didn't ask me. He assumed...
post #41 of 63
Actually, given that, I'll just say what I remember...

While we were free-skiing, when the camera comes out, things change (at least for me). As I said earlier, there was a bit of a focus on how well I looked on-camera, and that always messes things up, doesn't it?

In these turns I was focused on the pinch at my waist. I was trying to make sure that I got a lot of angle between my upper- and lower-body. I was aiming to simultaneously get high edge angles, as well. As a result, I lost my focus on the transition and reverted to my habitual style that I am attempting to break, building pressure throughout the turn and then releasing it more rapidly at transition than I have learned to do.

I think I accomplished pretty good upper/lower separation and decent angles. I think the result at the snow was less than pleasant, and not what I was expecting. I've learned a lot from the process, however, and am deeply appreciative for all of the insights and lengthy comments.

The good news for me in all of this is that it's helping me with the cause/effect relationships. Hopefully this week I'll be able to experiment with this a bit more...
post #42 of 63
Sounds great to me, ssh!

I'm in a glasshouse throwing stones, but having skied with you a bit, my $0.02:
First ...take the camera away
I think you can get "deeper into the well" yet, combining the off camera timing with Bob's tipping and Martin's long leg/short leg.
post #43 of 63
Yep. You got it, cgeib. Those were the big lessons for me, too. In other words, I'm not doing what I think I'm doing. And that is a pretty significant lesson for me!
post #44 of 63
I think it's very hard to ski, and be focusing on little, isolated things. Maybe it would work if that one little thing fixed the whole, but if not, it just breaks the body up into pieces. Makes you jerky, mechanical, sequential.

by all means try to fix things with smart drills, but when you ski as a whole, try to use larger movements that draw in the desirable and eliminate the undesirable, rather than thinking dire thoughts about what one's little finger is doing.
post #45 of 63
Steve,

Those of us who have braved a video MA here will tell you that it's a humbling and sometimes confusing experience. You need to consider that not everyone's eye is as trained or as acute as others' and ditto for people's ability to translate what they see into analysis and prescription. Others may see things that they don't mention because they want to focus on a few high leverage points. Anyway, there's the skiing (objective) and then there's the observation and interpretation (subjective). I think you will arrive at something like truth if you take all the feedback you have received and reduce it to the common threads.
post #46 of 63
Nice comments Bob! I'm a bit confused about this section though:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes/Colorado
Look for the feeling of effortlessness, of floating through the transition, of "having nothing going on at the end of the turn." As your new edges reengage early in the new turn, extend your legs to reestablish pressure and begin the carve. You should never feel like you're "pushing" on your skis. It should feel like you're pulling yourself through with your inside foot and leg, and that your outside ski is pushing on you. Nor do you push your skis onto their edges--you pull them over, focusing on the inside ski through the turn, as the outside ski follows, until it's time to start coming out of the turn--then you start pulling yourself across with a focus on what will become the inside ski of the next turn.
This starts of by saying we should strive for a feeling of effortlessness, or "having nothing going on at the end of the turn", but ends by saying we'll be pulling ourselves into the next turn....

I can follow the notion of effortlessness, if I equate the move accross the skis with the inertial path of the CM. The instruction of pulling ourselves into the new turn seems to contradict what I'd otherwise just "let" happen.

Sign me confused!:
post #47 of 63
When I skied behind you on the cat track going over to Blue Sky and you started laying trenches on the cat track, I thought holy he!!, this guy can really lay down some arcs and load a ski up. I would describe your skiing as very dynamic. I always thought getting the ski to arc and loading it up was the objective of upper level skiing.

Am I understanding the MA analysis correctly if the suggestion is to more gradually build forces and edge angles up in the turn? If so, what becomes the implication when skiing on an 11 meter Metron ski? Not knowing any better, if you create high edge angles on this ski you will make a very short turn and a lot of rebound(that's a word that I don't think I 've heard in recent times) , maybe because most skis no longer need to be skied in this manner.

My confusion in understanding the MA analysis is if I interpreted what was being said correctly is that you want higher edge angles later in the progression of the turn not as abruptly . If that's the case, it would indicate to me as you draw the turn out more you increase the radius of the turn? How then do you make a shorter radius turn absent of steering?

The other guy we all know and love talks about the high C portion of the turn beginning very early in the turn, which I interpreted as a creation of high edge angles at initiation.

How dense am I here? My goal in life is to be as confused about skiing as golf. I think I'm well on my way.
post #48 of 63
If I may step in?

I think the suggestion was to get higher edges earlier, so that you can decrease them later to help manage pressure. The "problem" was the rapid onset of pressure at the end of the turn was contributing to the "pop"/"up and over" move. By getting more pressure earlier, you get more of the turn done sooner, and there is reduced pressure at the bottom of the arc. It is then much easier to go across instead of "up and over".

In essence, turn the "J" turn upside down. BTW, if you do that, it becomes a comma. : Bwahaha!
post #49 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler
Your posts in this thread were well worth the price of admission .
...not to mention epicski supporter status.

thanks; this is great stuff.
post #50 of 63
Quote:
This starts of by saying we should strive for a feeling of effortlessness, or "having nothing going on at the end of the turn", but ends by saying we'll be pulling ourselves into the next turn....
Good point, BigE. I can see how that could sound contradictory. The point really isn't that you aren't doing anything to start the turn, but that every movement that has to happen has already started, and you simply allow it to continue through the transition.

I described the sensation as "pulling" to differentiate it from the perhaps more common thought of "pushing" to create pressure on the skis. It's a description of a sensation ("should feel like you're pulling. . . "), not of an actual movement or even a physical reality. Clearly, when you're leaned way over in a turn, you cannot actually "pull" yourself across your skis from one side to the other, simply by tipping the downhill boot. Your body--your center of mass--must already be moving that way, as you simply keep ahead of it (so to speak) by actively tipping the downhill foot. (I did touch briefly on this point when I added parenthetically, "naturally, you must also begin to reduce your inclination into the turn at the same time, so that your body remains in balance as it moves out of, across your skis, and into the next turn.") It should feel like you're pulling yourself across. . . .

This has been a big topic of discussion here and elsewhere, for a long time. Do tipping/edging movements start in the feet, at the bottom of the kinetic chain, or is their origin in the center of mass? There are rabid proponents of each point of view. My answer is--both! Edging movements, including both angulation and inclination, originate in feet and ankles, but only if the CM is in the right place (balance) and moving the right direction already.

So this is what I was trying to describe to Steve, with the concept of "finishing neutral." It isn't that there's no effort involved in making, among other things, the "crossover" happen, but that the effort must begin long before the transition. Indeed, in highly dynamic carved turns, "finishing neutral" demands intense effort throughout the turn to "drive" your body forward, down the hill, into the turn, and toward neutral at the finish. When you do this, you drive your CM and your feet on separate trajectories that intersect at the transition. Because they're already moving that way, you can, indeed, simply let these trajectories continue through the moment of transition. You let go of the mountain (release your edges), which stops the direction change of your feet, and allow your CM to continue in its path across your skis (crossover) and into the new turn. ("A body in motion will continue in constant motion. . . .")

At that moment of transition ("neutral"), it really should feel "effortless," like you're just floating into the new turn. There should be no lateral forces acting on your skis or your body ("nothing going on"), at that one moment. And the active tipping ("untipping") out of the turn is what causes these lateral forces to diminish to nothing.

It is actually possible to be totally passive for that moment of release, IF you've set everything up right coming out of the last turn. But one of Steve's issues (in my opinion) was his general lack of much activity of the inside foot and leg. So I recommended that he focus on that activity, continuously, including through the transition: "That heightened activity [of the inside foot and leg] should reduce, if not eliminate, the a-frame, which is a sign of insufficient inside leg activity. And it will feel as if it is "pulling" you all the way through the transition. . . ."

I hope that helps explain the apparent conflict between "pulling" and having "nothing going on." If the intent was simply to end the turn in a traverse, rather than linking into a new turn, I would suggest that you actually could (and should) stop the active tipping of the downhill leg at the end of the turn. Even when turns are linked, the tipping ("pulling") serves no real purpose at that isolated moment of release. It is more a preparatory movement to make sure the skis continue tipping so that, when it's time to engage the edges again in the new turn, they'll be ready! It's kind of like swinging your right foot forward when you're walking on your left foot. You don't really have to at that moment, but you'll discover the movement's usefulness when it's time for that next step!

A (nearly) final note. Perhaps part of the paradox is that this "moment" I keep referring to, this "neutral," when there should be "nothing going on," has no duration whatsoever! It's the transition in a smooth S-shaped path between turning right and left--it exists, but it has no length or time. Like a doorway you pass quickly through, you really do pass through it--and someone could take a picture of your "position" at that moment, but you do not stop there. It is the middle of a continuous movement. For this reason as well, while there's really nothing you need to do at that moment, you really shouldn't stop your continuous efforts either. "It should feel like you're pulling yourself through. . . ."

And a final (I promise!) thought. It is important to note that I intentionally did NOT say in my original post that you should pull yourself into the turn, as you suggest. I said that it should feel like you pull yourself out of the previous turn, so that the movements can continue through the transition. It's a critical difference! You would have to provide some sort of force--a push or a pull--to cause the crossover (or cross under) if those motions were not already in place as you exited the last turn. This is what happens with "park & ride" syndrome--it's the failure to "finish neutral." In contrast to the "nothing going on" transition, where the activity is continuous throughout the turn, "park & riders" do very little throughout the turn, requiring their biggest effort at the transition.

I hope I didn't just throw more gas on the fire!

Best regards,
Bob
post #51 of 63

I'd say this is probably the best teaching aid...

Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
BTW, weems, I just registered for the Copper Mountain PSIA-RM race clinic in May. :
...you're gonna experience. I guess I'm biased because I'm an L3 with 5 years teaching at Breck/Copper, but for the last 15 years I've not taught, just kept up my cert and raced/trained Masters. You've got a ton of good input that pretty much covers the gamut of what I see, so I'm not going to rehash that...basically, I see pretty clean skiing and you've noted the skill areas you want to work on.

So how is running gates going to help? Here's what I think: when I was teaching/free skiing, I found that, on a certain level, we got obsessed with skills development as an end in itself. To an extent, that's fine...it's sort of like the guy who decides he's going to take up woodworking to make fine furniture, but somewhere along the way he gets fixated on how to carve a perfect free curve in a piece of oak. In a way, that's fine, because it's the true expression of the Work Ethic, which is the work for it's own sake. But it's also a little limiting...kind of like the artisans who used to paint elegant landscapes on the underside of the king's chair in the Louis the XIV era.

I started backing off from the "technique is God" approach when I got a succession of students who had to improve their parallel because: (a) They had to get better so they could ski with their wife/husband/kids/whatever (b) They had to get better so they could stick it to the guys in the office, (c) They had to get better because they were hard wired to succeed at everything they ever tried, whatever succeeding meant.

So I said, "Hey, that's fine, but why do you want to get better? I always thought getting better would let me see things and have experiences on skis I couldn't at a lower skill level...don't you want to go ski the steep and deep? Run downhill? Go to Zermatt and ski over to Cervinia? All of those things are rare experiences that few people ever get to have...pick one out or make one up for yourself, and go for it...that's the reward for developing your skills."

The first time I ever ran a downhill, I didn't really know I could do it. But I figured that the risks were worth the reward, and I'd figure it out somehow. Which I did, with a little help from my friends, and the rewards...well, let's just say that my first trip down a course at 65 m. p. h. plus was better than sex.

Running gates is a good dose of reality, because there are no style points. What the judges think doesn't matter. The clock doesn't lie. Obviously, you have to have a clean turn to be fast or even make it through the gates, but you also have to have good tactics, otherwise the best turn in the world isn't going to buy you anything. Tactics...a lot of which consists of looking ahead...is something we sort of neglect outside the race course, but as we all know, tactics are really important skiing out in the weeds, or in cruddy snow, or flat light.

Running gates is good discipline for free skiing, because you don't get to pick the turns, the course setter does. It isn't that everybody has to turn in exactly the same place...slalom has maybe the most constrained line, but even there, as in all the other disciplines, there is always a green line, a yellow line, and a red line, and a bunch of other variations thereof. Watch some World Cup GS, and you'll see that Bode, Benni Raich, and Daron take vastly different lines in GS. What is common, however, to all racers is in that nanosecond where you cross the rise line, you need to get on your new edges right now...or even sooner, depending on the set. Anything less, and you're out...no second chances, no video replay.

One other thing about running gates is that skiing fast is not the same as making 45 or 50 cookie-cutter turns. I had a coach who told me to stop trying to ski perfectly (because I was skiing Perfectly Slow) and start thinking about going fast. "Look at Hermann Maier," he said. "He makes mistakes and still wins ski races."

You'll see some "perfect" runs...Benni had acouple in GS this year, and definitely his second run in the Olympic SL was pretty close to perfect. But he also hacked a turn big time at the top of Golden Eagle pitch in the 2005 World Cup GS at Beaver Creek...and still hung tough and won the overall race. Skiing well doesn't necessarily mean skiing perfectly, and vice versa. Some of my fastest runs in slalom...and the most fun...were basically a series of linked recoveries.

I got some similar coaching this year..."Attack more, be more aggressive, because it'll open up all your senses so you can read the course and terrain coming up at you and make whatever adjustments you need to keep your momentum. Be quick, because when you start skiing faster, the gates come up quicker..."

So I think running gates can amp up anybody's skills, and confidence, and because it's so much fun...which is why we all got into skiing, right?...it'll give you a whole new set of larger goals in your free skiing, teaching, and so forth.

One thing I'd say is don't try to run gates on the skis you have. Borrow somebody's GS skis (and slaloms, if that's on the menu), and definitely wear a helmet, and pad up fully for slalom...which is Full Contact Ski Racing...good luck...
post #52 of 63
Quote:
Am I understanding the MA analysis correctly if the suggestion is to more gradually build forces and edge angles up in the turn? If so, what becomes the implication when skiing on an 11 meter Metron ski? Not knowing any better, if you create high edge angles on this ski you will make a very short turn and a lot of rebound(that's a word that I don't think I 've heard in recent times) , maybe because most skis no longer need to be skied in this manner.

My confusion in understanding the MA analysis is if I interpreted what was being said correctly is that you want higher edge angles later in the progression of the turn not as abruptly . If that's the case, it would indicate to me as you draw the turn out more you increase the radius of the turn? How then do you make a shorter radius turn absent of steering?
I assume that this post is directed to me, Roundturns?

If so, I agree with BigE's concise reply:

Quote:
I think the suggestion was to get higher edges earlier, so that you can decrease them later to help manage pressure. The "problem" was the rapid onset of pressure at the end of the turn was contributing to the "pop"/"up and over" move. By getting more pressure earlier, you get more of the turn done sooner, and there is reduced pressure at the bottom of the arc. It is then much easier to go across instead of "up and over".

In essence, turn the "J" turn upside down. BTW, if you do that, it becomes a comma. : Bwahaha!
(Although I am tempted to ask, BigE, "Which font"? : )

In suggesting ways to get the carve phase started earlier, and to smooth out the pressure changes in Steve's skiing that were throwing him around a bit, I suggested a fundamental change in the timing of flexion-extension movements (and by implication, of edging movements as well). Long where he was short, short where he was long. Edges released at the end of the turn, rather than set.

But do not mistake my thoughts on "smoothing" as implying that edging movements must be "gradual" or even "progressive." They can be, but it's your choice! The edge angle of skis on the snow, especially on hard snow, and especially with skis with deep sidecut like Steve's Metrons, has an enormous effect on the radius of the turn they want to carve. So that desired radius should dictate the edge angle at any point where you are actually carving (which also requires sufficient and accurately focused pressure to bend the skis into reverse camber). If you want to carve a different sized arc, at any moment, I suggest you waste no time adjusting your edge angle! Only if you want "maximum smoothness" must you make these changes gradually.

I am also not a proponent of the common direction that your edge angle necessarily "should" always be either increasing or decreasing. There's no particular reason you couldn't, or shouldn't, tip your skis quickly to a desired angle on the snow, then strive to hold that angle for a period of time, finally reducing it and releasing the edges quite quickly to finish the turn. It would require an adjustment of the timing of all your other movement as well, but it's exactly what you would have to do if, for some reason, you wanted to carve a turn as "round" (by BigE's definition--constant radius, circular) as possible. This is a highly hypothetical example, because I don't think we need or try to make such a perfectly round turn very often, although "railroad tracks," "uphill carved arcs," and carved 360 degree circles on the flats come close!

So it all depends on your needs, your intent, and your motivation. If you're looking for the sensation of maximum smoothness, you'll find it in a line that is more or less sine-wave-shaped. Here, your movements must indeed be smooth, gradual, and progressive, and your edge angles will change constantly. If you're looking for carved turns of "maximum roundness" (which someone who chooses the name "Roundturns" might well be!), you'll need to establish pressure and edge angle as early as possible (but not earlier!) and hold both as constantly as possible, as long as possible, in the turn. If you're looking for maximum rebound to spring you out of the turn, you'll delay the maximum pressure and edge angle 'till the end.

But if you're "just skiing," or racing, you'll incorporate all these options, constantly adjusting your movements, and adding in active steering as needed as well, to accomplish whatever end you desire or require at any given moment. Virtuosity demands versatility! It's how expert recreational skiers express themselves, and how racers win races. Racers don't necessarily want "round" turns, or comma-shaped turns, or z-shaped turns, or any other shape in particular, and they certainly aren't tied to any single movement pattern. They simply want the fastest possible line they're able to ski, whatever shape it may take. And every different turn shape requires different movements!

(For what it's worth, and all else being equal--which it never is--I understand that the theoretically fastest line around a gate is the mathematical curve known as the "cycloid." PhysicsMan--any thoughts here?)

Best regards,
Bob Barnes
post #53 of 63
Thanks Bob, that's what I thought was going on in your description. Not that I can ellucidate it that well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes/Colorado
Do tipping/edging movements start in the feet, at the bottom of the kinetic chain, or is their origin in the center of mass? There are rabid proponents of each point of view. My answer is--both! Edging movements, including both angulation and inclination, originate in feet and ankles, but only if the CM is in the right place (balance) and moving the right direction already.
That's a gem. Especially how you snuck "intent" in there!

I think by releasing at the base of the chain your gonna get that cross-over happening. It's just a matter of timing to release when the CM is "moving in the right direction".

Look at edge re-engagement. The trajectory of the CM accross the skis is certainly defining how quickly the edges are going to re-engage, as well as which part of the ski is preferentially being pressured upon re-engagement. (The latter is not defined by the tipping process alone. Therefore, one cannot ignore the trajectory.)

The tipping of the inside foot will also produce some angulation, which will assist in re-engagement and also help drag that CM accross.

Proponents of the base camp, suggest that the movements at the base define the position of the CM in the new turn. That's great! But the CM is not going to get to that spot if your timing is off. ie, if your CM is going elsewhere upon release.

Bottom line -- you need to know where the CM is going regardless of the sort of release you choose to make.
post #54 of 63
Great post, SkiRacer! Your thoughts on the mental attitude needed to win races being quite different from "worshipping the technique God" or trying to ski "perfectly" (slowly) are exactly what I'm getting at! We practice to hone our technique and develp discipline. There's room for identifying "ideal" and "perfect"--and for practicing it. But practicing and performing are two different things!

Thanks for the great post!

Best regards,
Bob
post #55 of 63
Quote:
Look at edge re-engagement. The trajectory of the CM accross the skis is certainly defining how quickly the edges are going to re-engage, as well as which part of the ski is preferentially being pressured upon re-engagement. (The latter is not defined by the tipping process alone. Therefore, one cannot ignore the trajectory.)
Another great point, BigE! In all this discussion, we haven't even begun to address the fore-aft issues that are also so critically important!

post #56 of 63

You're welcome...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes/Colorado
Great post, SkiRacer! Your thoughts on the mental attitude needed to win races being quite different from "worshipping the technique God" or trying to ski "perfectly" (slowly) are exactly what I'm getting at! We practice to hone our technique and develp discipline. There's room for identifying "ideal" and "perfect"--and for practicing it. But practicing and performing are two different things!

Thanks for the great post!

Best regards,
Bob
...and let's not forget the goal of having more fun than you can shake a stick at! Don't you feel sorry for people who don't ski?
post #57 of 63
I had everything bassackwards as usual. Thank you for explaining this again. Sorry to put you through all that again!
post #58 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiRacer55
One thing I'd say is don't try to run gates on the skis you have. Borrow somebody's GS skis (and slaloms, if that's on the menu), and definitely wear a helmet, and pad up fully for slalom...which is Full Contact Ski Racing...good luck...
Thanks so much for all of your thoughts, SR55! Perhaps we can get together sometime and have some fun rippin'...

Part of the clinic is the availability of Nordica demos. Anyone got shin guards I can borrow? :
post #59 of 63

Nordica demos...

Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
Thanks so much for all of your thoughts, SR55! Perhaps we can get together sometime and have some fun rippin'...

Part of the clinic is the availability of Nordica demos. Anyone got shin guards I can borrow? :
...will work fine. You also need pole guards and shinguards, plus I'd have something like a Dainese slalom top and a face bar or helmet. You can use my stuff if you want...just send me a PM.

I'm not going to be at the clinic...did one at Vail in February before the Master's GS weekend, and I have Domestic Points to make, plus it's now tennis/biking season....but I'm sure we'll hook up at some point. I will probably be at A-Basin on Saturday to run some GS with SwissAm. My home hill for training is Eldora. You can see all the info about Rocky Mountain Masters, including training, gear, and so forth, at:

www.rmmskiracing.org

There's plenty of things to amuse/instruct the casual passerby on the SnowNews and Articles page. I'd especially recommend the February 2003 issue of SnowNews, one of the most fun ones I did when I was editor. Below all the SnowNews issues, you'll see a bunch of articles. I strongly recommend you immediately go there and read Goals for 2007 and Hotbox from Hell...that'll loosen you up proper for your race clinic.

Richard Malmros
post #60 of 63
Once again, my thanks to everyone who posted MAs and comments in this thread and also to those who chose to PM me with those thoughts. I learned much from them all.

I had the great fortune to ski with Bob Barnes (and Faisasy) yesterday (unfortunately, we lost Mike_m early and didn't find each other to ski together!). What a wonderful day of spring skiing we had! And what an incredible skier Bob is, too (but, more on those in a trip report to be posted "soon"). During the day, however, I was grateful to hear from Bob that I was accurate in commenting that the "pop" isn't a normal part of my skiing and that the turns shown in this video are actually more a result of intent and performing for the camera than they are representative of my everyday skiing.

That said, in a video that Bob took yesterday, I was able to see the impact of my hand movement very dramatically. Interestingly, I tend to overdrive my turns early in a run (i.e., just after I push off; the first few turns), using my hands in that old vestige of racer flash, moving them across the front of my skis and back out to plant my pole (more frequently the left than the right). As a result, my skeletal alignment gets shifted, my outside ski drifts, when it finally gets to critical edge angle, the edge angle is radical and causes a rapid hook-up, and, on the Metrons, tightens the turn so dramatically that it can launch me.

However, again in this same video, after a couple of turns, I relaxed into the turns, moving my upper-body with the skis into the turns, standing in the middle of the boot shafts, and generally allowing the skis to turn rather than making movements intended to cause more than the slope, speed, and conditions were willing to give. The good news for me is that I can do this, and am doing it in my skiing frequently. The learning is that I need to work less and allow more. Still more. At least I think I can remember that feeling and go after it on my next day out.

One of the more interesting games that we played was skiing by banking. Instead of angulating, we just skied very upright and used tipping our bodies to turn the skis. It gave insights. Any thoughts on what those insights might be?
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