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binding storage

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
I hope I'm not asking a question that is already answered here but I couldn't find it. What is the current advice for summer binding storage. Is tension release still recommended?
post #2 of 21
I think it's still recommended, but I haven't done it for a couple years. I'd be curious what other people think.
post #3 of 21
you might be increasing the life of the spring by the # of summer months they are turned down, and can't be any worse than leaving them cranked up. it also only takes 10 seconds to turn them down when you wax for summer storage and 10 seconds to turn em back up when you scrape off the wax and dust in the fall.
but, i dont think any extremely scientific studies have ever been conducted to actually determine the + & - of both.
post #4 of 21
Also, does it matter if heel pieces are stored up or down?
post #5 of 21
I dont think it should matter the dirrection they are stored, just make sure there is no moisture at all , anywhere on the ski. Also dont leave any skis cement, it sucks the moisture out of them pretty quick.
post #6 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by JM3K3
Also dont leave any skis cement, it sucks the moisture out of them pretty quick.
standing vertically?
post #7 of 21
I always turn binding settings down to zero at the end of the season.

Skis should be placed in a climate controlled area and not hung by the tips (as in between pegs). NEVER on concrete. Under the bed or in the back of a bedroom closet works pretty good.

If you ski in an area where there is a lot of warm/wet/greasy or dirty or machine made....or if (God forbid) you drive around with them on the roof rack without a binding cover or bag......remove the binding from the ski and clean out the inside of the binding from the back....You won't believe the grunge....Then lube it...spray lightly with silicone spray and reinstall on the ski.

This will take about 45 minutes....knee surgery costs about 10,000 ......your choice
post #8 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Louie
Skis should be placed in a climate controlled area and not hung by the tips (as in between pegs). NEVER on concrete. Under the bed or in the back of a bedroom closet works pretty good.
I'm interested in the "why" for the never on concrete comment. I've never stored my skis with any part touching concrete, but I am considering it for this off-season (either in the unfinished part of our basement or in the garage). What is the danger?
post #9 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler
I'm interested in the "why" for the never on concrete comment. I've never stored my skis with any part touching concrete, but I am considering it for this off-season (either in the unfinished part of our basement or in the garage). What is the danger?
I don't know exactly, but the folks at the mini-storage area I rent at said moisture rises up through the concrete, and that I should use pallets for storing anything that might be susceptable to water damaged.
post #10 of 21
Noodler,

Place a piece of clear plastic over a couple of square feet of your dry cement floor and then come back in a day or so.....you will be suprised by the amount of water.
post #11 of 21
My dad has been designing springs since the 1960s, so I asked his opinion about backing off binding springs:

More than likely the springs were designed to sustain a static load for long periods of time without setting ( losing free length ). It's probably not a bad idea to back off on the compression load of the springs if they are not going to be used for a long period of time, certainly would not hurt the spring's function.

So this is not definitive one way or another, but it sounds like not backing them off is probably OK. BTW, he's not a skier.

Craig
post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by UK2TX2CA
Noodler,

Place a piece of clear plastic over a couple of square feet of your dry cement floor and then come back in a day or so.....you will be suprised by the amount of water.
This is the practical application that shows the point. Concrete can saturate and is prone to radical temperature swings which causes condensation. Leave your skis against that surface and it's like leaving them in a puddle...

Noodler....you may actually get away with it where you live due to such low humidity rates....but I wouldn't chance it.

About binding springs. I agree that the springs probably can take constant tension. Here are the points to consider.

If you leave tension on the spring It's almost certain that in time there will be a reduction in the springs tension vs taking tension off the spring. For those that keep their gear for several years you may experience a din setting that differs from the number (and original setting) on your binding. Weaker spring = less tension.
So what would be the disadvantage to turning them down ?

Second for those of you with bindings that are a few years old with a lot of miles on them.....you wouldn't believe the gunk that combines with the grease inside the binding, especially if you drive with them on a roof rack. The gunk stays between the springs.....just like sandpaper.

If you ski in an area of the country where there is lots of snowmaking, grease or dust visable on the hill in the spring or put them on a roof rack...all that stuff you see on the base of the ski....is imbedded in the binding...kind of like the inside of a septic tank....but doesn't smell as bad:
post #13 of 21
does anyone know of a source for a really wide headed screwdriver to use for turning binding screws that won't strip the metal

I use a normal big screwdriver but it' still too small and seems to deform the metal of the screws

anyone know of a really big & wide driver to use? and if so where to get it

ie. what do the binding manufacturers use to set the base tension?

thx
post #14 of 21
I use one of these with 10mm blade.

http://www.wihatools.com/308serie.htm
post #15 of 21
Squawman - #3 Posidrive works on all of my bindings.
post #16 of 21
UL,
What harm comes from hanging skis by the tips? I have done this for years because my house came with ski racks in the basement.

Also, Marker toes do not have to be turned down. There is no tension on the spring until the boot toe starts to move sideways. Marker lit does recommend storing with the heel engaged. I am guessing that there is less tension on the spring that way. But if this is true, I would think they should always be left engaged. LewBob
post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler
Squawman - #3 Posidrive works on all of my bindings.
My 916's have a massive 3/4" screw head for setting the DIN. And they require a massive slotted screwdriver in order to turn them. My other bindings accept either #3 Pozi or both for the DIN screw though.
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by real9999
I use one of these with 10mm blade.

http://www.wihatools.com/308serie.htm

would the 12mm blade be too big? it fits other applications I might need it for better

by too big I mean the vertical height of the head.... .472 for the 12mm _vs_ .393 for the 10mm

http://www.wihatools.com/308serie.htm
post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by SquawMan
would the 12mm blade be too big? it fits other applications I might need it for better
Hmm. I'm not sure. It depends on the binding since there's no standard size like there is with #3 Pozi screws. I use mine because it just happens to be the biggest slotted screwdriver I have. The Wiha's are very well made tools BTW.
post #20 of 21
Thread Starter 

summer binding storage

I started this thread a couple of weeks ago and researching since discovered another thread from 2003 that addresses the issue of whether or not to release binding tension. Here is the link:
http://forums.epicski.com/showthread...ding+sto rage

The most succinct feedback came from member ronaldp who said this (slightly edited):
I am an engineer and ski very seriously (for a flatlander.) Here's my input from an engineering perspective on the issue of releasing binding tension over the summer:

1. You could leave your bindings set for 30 years and not affect performance one way or the other, at least in regards to the springs.

2. You could also adjust them back to zero after every ski day and not affect performance one way or the other, again only in regards to the springs.

3. The concept, however, of prolonging the life of a device such as a ski binding, or a component such as a compression spring, by lowering the duty cycle or "releasing the DIN setting" periodically, is indeed based on sound engineering. The principle is to minimize performance degradation, in other words extending the life, by reducing the potential for fatigue, creep, and stress loading.

It may very well be overkill for ski bindings though. Starting with the right spring is far more important than how you use it in service. It's not an easy subject. Springs seem to baffle a lot of good engineers and designers, even predictable compression springs like these.
The springs themselves are not the nemesis. The skis will wear out before the bindings. And within the binding design and component quality, several other components or functions will usually fail, or at least become unreliable first.
post #21 of 21
Thread Starter 

summer binding storage

I started this thread a couple of weeks ago and researching since discovered another thread from 2003 that addresses the issue of whether or not to release binding tension. Here is the link:
http://forums.epicski.com/showthread...ding+sto rage

The most succinct feedback came from member ronaldp who said this (slightly edited):
I am an engineer and ski very seriously (for a flatlander.) Here's my input from an engineering perspective on the issue of releasing binding tension over the summer:

1. You could leave your bindings set for 30 years and not affect performance one way or the other, at least in regards to the springs.

2. You could also adjust them back to zero after every ski day and not affect performance one way or the other, again only in regards to the springs.

3. The concept, however, of prolonging the life of a device such as a ski binding, or a component such as a compression spring, by lowering the duty cycle or "releasing the DIN setting" periodically, is indeed based on sound engineering. The principle is to minimize performance degradation, in other words extending the life, by reducing the potential for fatigue, creep, and stress loading.

It may very well be overkill for ski bindings though. Starting with the right spring is far more important than how you use it in service. It's not an easy subject. Springs seem to baffle a lot of good engineers and designers, even predictable compression springs like these.
The springs themselves are not the nemesis. The skis will wear out before the bindings. And within the binding design and component quality, several other components or functions will usually fail, or at least become unreliable first.
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