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Begining Skis for Women

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hello,
I am new to this forum and have been reading past posts for a few days now, but still have a couple of questions.

There is a small ski area near where I live on the Eastern slope of the Sierras - it has exactly 2 lifts and a tiny warming hut. My 17 yo son has been snowboarding there a couple of times and he says it wouldn't cramp his style if Mom went, too. So I'm looking for ski gear.

I've been skiing about 5 times in the past 25 years, mostly on Hansel and Gretel slopes at Mammoth. Don't have much interest in going beyond the bunny slopes. I figure I'll ski with my son once or twice a year for 2 or 3 hours. I'm 50 and don't have much stamina or time for recreation, but I like my kid.

I'm 5'3" and weigh 110 dripping wet (probably add another 5-10 lbs for gear). I've been looking on ebay for women's skis and have a couple of options: 142cm skis that are 104/67/93 or 150cm that are 114/74/104. I would have more options if I could use gear for juniors - is that feasible at my height, weight and skill level?

I've been reading the fat-ski debate, but also read that short skis are more manuverable. Is there really much difference between 142cm and 150cm? Is there much difference between a waist of 67 and one of 74? Given my lack of experience, would I notice the difference between Dynastars and a pair of wooden planks strapped to my feet? I don't care if I look like a "gaper", whatever that is. I just want to noodle around on the hill without being too tired to go to work the next day.

Since I live in the middle of nowhere, I'm going to mail order. Skis are not sold locally and the ski area has very few rentals so if you are not first in line, your size may not be available. Whatever gear I get will just have to do.

I'm sorry to take the time of all you pros and semi-pros with rank beginner questions, but I am a bit lost. Thank you for taking a look at this.

Phoebe
post #2 of 15

Welcome to Epic!!!!

First, you found a great site for ski information and instruction. Hang around here awhile and you might just become addicted to this sport.

As for your request, please check out the search function tool as there are tons of articles on beginner and interm. ski equipment. You are also in the area of a great source of equipment. Try PMing "dawgcatching" , he can give you the best advice and prices on your needs. Good luck!

Hang tight, I'm sure that the knowledgable members will give you some suggestions....
post #3 of 15
I just got my wife skis.

We're all (2 sons, wife and myself) just beginning but she doesn't have historical (as in she never played any sports growing up) athleticism so I opted for her to get 'beginner' skis.

She is 5'3" and 100 pounds. The 150 cm Balanz 3:1 skis are working well for her.
post #4 of 15
Check out the Volkl Attiva skis for women. They have different skis for different levels. I have one of their older models, a Gamma 380 (last year's model). It is an intermediate ski, and my instructor said it is perfect for my level (around a 5).

Because of the narrow waist, some of these skis are more suited to groomed runs rather than powder skiing.

A similar ski I have seen online is the Nordica SUV series. They also have a narrow waist. This makes them turn easily, but probably not in powder. Since I am in the East, we don't worry about powder too much.
post #5 of 15
Novices in all sports make mistakes when they first buy equipment. What you want to do is buy smart and only buy once until you're ready or need to buy better equipment. I think you should talk to the professionals in a good shop who will fit you properly and sell you the equipment you need.

Check out www.sierrasnowboard.com The shop is in you're area, they respond to emails quickly with great advice, and their prices are great. I'm going to purchase a set of skis for my son from them. Email Jim and I bet he'll help you out. He's a regular poster on epicski.
post #6 of 15
Phoebe -- Atomic (Balanz) and Blizzard (X-spirit) both have decent entry level women's skis that are not too expensive. My wife has Blizzards and her sister got some Atomics.
post #7 of 15
BOOTS, BOOTS, BOOTS!!!!!

Before dropping $ on skis, go to a good shop and get properly fitted for boots. Your boots will be the most important piece of ski equipment you'll ever own. Spend as much time and money as you can on the boots. Ski technology is changing so fast that anything you buy today will be outdated in around 2-3 years, but you'll hang onto a pair of well fitting boots until they literally fall apart.

As you're advancing as a skier, you'll probably outgrow your first pair of skis fairly quickly, so just follow your shop's advice on a good pair of beginner/intermediate skis.

Welcome, and good luck!
post #8 of 15
I would agree boots are very important. I didn't have anyone special fit me, but was lucky in that due to many years of specialized shoes (I was a dancer) I was able to make a good choice for myself. I will be sure to go to a good place I know now when I get new boots in a year or two. Just make sure when you get fitted that you are clear and honest as to your skiing intentions so that they put you in the right boot.

As for skis I'll say my first skis were K2 T-9 Mystery Luvs (similar to First Luvs). These were great skis for me to learn on and I only replaced them as I started to ski too agressively for their softness (too much chatter when I went fast). I would definitely suggest these for someone like you. I am 5'3, 123lbs for reference. Also I'd suggest you look at skis in the 146cm-153cm range. I was given 146's for my first "learn to ski" day rental and quickly found them too short, but your results may vary. I ski on 153s now and wouldn't change.
post #9 of 15
I'm not a very experienced skier either. I had a pair of Rossignol ex-rentals and didn't progress very fast with them, plus they were about 6 years old so the shapes are different now. At the beginning of this ski season I finally bought a pair of Nordica Olympia Serenity women's skis and I love them....and have made huge progress on them. I'm 5'7" and my skis are 150cm....I'm happy with that length, but you might want shorter ones. Nordica rated these as "intermediate" but I don't think they are all that stiff and they had 2 models above this one that were more advanced. They had a lower more beginning model which I skied on once (I think they were called Olympia Harmony)....I'm not yet a good judge of skis, but somehow I felt they weren't quite right and I traded up for the Serenity level and I could see a positive difference with it....turning was easier and better. I have really progressed in my skiing this season and I definitely think the Nordicas helped. Nice bindings on them, too.

Also....I agree with the others in that the BOOT is absolutely #1 in importance...get fitted by someone who knows how to fit ski boots. Not all boots will work for all feet. I got the Nordica Beast boots from REI last year, and they are great for my particular foot. Other brands were too narrow for me. So find a good boot fitter and check out the various brands for how they fit you.
post #10 of 15
FIRST, forget fat skis, that's not for beginners.

SECOND, get a good boot (not too stiff, 80 flex max). THIS IS PRIORITY in terms of spending your ski budget.

THIRD, buy anything soft, short and used (if it's your first pair you will trash it anyway), and you'll be fine. K2, Dynastar, Rossi, Atomic, Volkl, etc. almost all ski companies have a specialized woman line. Used K2, Rossi and Salomon would be cheaper. Good luck on your search.
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219
Phoebe -- Atomic (Balanz) and Blizzard (X-spirit) both have decent entry level women's skis that are not too expensive. My wife has Blizzards and her sister got some Atomics.
We just got the Blizzard version for the wife this season. She seems to like them quite a bit. She was skiing on a pair of Volants before. She quit skiing for quite a few years because she hated the weight, the length and the stiffness. Bottom line, unless you're very athletic and expect yourself to progress quickly, pick something light, short and soft -- like most late model entry level skis.
post #12 of 15
Just found these on overstock.com for <$180, check these out...
http://www.overstock.com/?page=proframe&prod_id=1081396

Shipping should be free today with 10% off (ending tomorrow). So, it makes the deal much more attractive. And, overstock.com is certainly far less risky than eBay. Use the links found in this for the discount and free s/h...
http://www.bensbargains.net/ktalk/11...7,58769,.shtml

BTW, don't forget the boots. I would not recommend online purchase for a good fit which is very important. But, if you have to do online, rei.com has some good deals (at least half off) on some recreational women's boots. http://www.rei.com/shop/Ski.htm
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phoebe3
Hello,
I am new to this forum and have been reading past posts for a few days now, but still have a couple of questions.

There is a small ski area near where I live on the Eastern slope of the Sierras - it has exactly 2 lifts and a tiny warming hut. My 17 yo son has been snowboarding there a couple of times and he says it wouldn't cramp his style if Mom went, too. So I'm looking for ski gear.

I've been skiing about 5 times in the past 25 years, mostly on Hansel and Gretel slopes at Mammoth. Don't have much interest in going beyond the bunny slopes. I figure I'll ski with my son once or twice a year for 2 or 3 hours. I'm 50 and don't have much stamina or time for recreation, but I like my kid.

I'm 5'3" and weigh 110 dripping wet (probably add another 5-10 lbs for gear). I've been looking on ebay for women's skis and have a couple of options: 142cm skis that are 104/67/93 or 150cm that are 114/74/104. I would have more options if I could use gear for juniors - is that feasible at my height, weight and skill level?

I've been reading the fat-ski debate, but also read that short skis are more manuverable. Is there really much difference between 142cm and 150cm? Is there much difference between a waist of 67 and one of 74? Given my lack of experience, would I notice the difference between Dynastars and a pair of wooden planks strapped to my feet? I don't care if I look like a "gaper", whatever that is. I just want to noodle around on the hill without being too tired to go to work the next day.

Since I live in the middle of nowhere, I'm going to mail order. Skis are not sold locally and the ski area has very few rentals so if you are not first in line, your size may not be available. Whatever gear I get will just have to do.

I'm sorry to take the time of all you pros and semi-pros with rank beginner questions, but I am a bit lost. Thank you for taking a look at this.

Phoebe
I love being called a pro. Even a semi-pro.

IMO the answer is boots. In a good shop, not by mail order. they will last for years, so it's not wasted money. (do not over buy either !)
For skis, if rentals are not an option, yes, anything soft and short 'for beginner' at a low price (second hand or over stock). Anyway, if you get hooked you will outgrow them quickly but will have fun anyway, if you don't get hooked and stay on the bunny slope, who cares ?
And you shouldn't ski dripping wet . You'll get a flu.
post #14 of 15
After reading this thead and the one about bindings, I'll suggest some lessons ! If you can't get to the bottom of a bunny slope without a fall, you obviously have everything to learn. Which is perfectly OK ! You have to start someday and kudos for doing so at 50. I wouldn't !
But some hours with a coach will save you a LOT of time and skiing will very quickly seem more fun.
Really.
Go back to school, you wont find everything by yourself.
post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chanwmr
Just found these on overstock.com for <$180, check these out...
http://www.overstock.com/?page=proframe&prod_id=1081396

Shipping should be free today with 10% off (ending tomorrow). So, it makes the deal much more attractive. And, overstock.com is certainly far less risky than eBay. Use the links found in this for the discount and free s/h...
http://www.bensbargains.net/ktalk/11...7,58769,.shtml
Thanks! I had already purchased a pair of Dynastar Exclusive 8's, but I did buy a set for my husband - who is not yet aware he will be skiing next fall . Fortunately, he's really good about that sort of thing and since he had been skiing several times before we were married, back in the Dark Ages, I'm sure he'll be delighted.

I do intend to take lessons. I just want to have some confidence in my equipment.

Thanks again!
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