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Freestyle skis

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
I admit, I don't know a THING about twin tips and didn't think I would ever want to. All I do know is my non-skiing husband liked the K2 Public Enemies two seasons back, but then what does he know?

Anyway, my daughter's latest boyfriend took up snowboarding for the first time last season and decided next season he wants to try skiing. Given the snowboarding background and the age (19), I recommended he try freestyle (he's a daredevil), but naturally the next question was what skis he should get. Now, he tried skiing once this year (the daughter races and of course watching her, he thought skiing looked so easy), but it was pretty much a disastrous day for him. So I can safely say that even though he is extremely athletic and picked up snowboarding quite quickly, that he is definitely a beginner when it comes to skiing. He seems to have the bucks to buy the best of anything he wants.

Any suggestions for an athletic teenager who may not be a beginner for long? He will be skiing in Montana, mostly at Bridger.
post #2 of 22

RENT....then buy

First, RENT. It's not a given that people that enjoy boarding would like skiing and viceversa. I am one of those viceversa cases.

THEN, if he likes it and given that it is going to be his first pair (and he is going to trash anyway, specially in the park) I would buy something that he would not lament trashing very much. A cheap used pair of Salomon Pocket Rockets could fit the bill. Check eBay.

After this if he really loves the park & pipe thing, then he can upgrade to a Völkl Karma/Dogen, Dynastar Troublemaker or Atomic Triplets (all great skis).
post #3 of 22
I would not recommend the rental route in this case. The kind of skis you are talking about are only available as fairly expensive demo/rentals. Something like the Volkl Karma, K2 Seth Vicious, Atomic Snoop/sugar Daddy, Rossi Scratch BC would give a wide stable platform and might make his transition easier. All of these would be a blast for powder, can cover a wide variety of conditions, and look cool; something that might appeal to a snowboarder. The wider skis and twin tips will ski relatively sloppy for a beginner, which means he can smear his turns. Perfect, as he gets better he can learn to use the edges. I would recommend buying relatively short for (size/weight dependent) a beginner to allow an easier transition into turning and jibbing.

Boots are where its going to be at. If he gets a good fit, the skiing will succeed, if not, he will probably have a painful and low performance experinece. I would focus there first.
post #4 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider
I would not recommend the rental route in this case. The kind of skis you are talking about are only available as fairly expensive demo/rentals.
The kid doesn't even know yet if he is going to like skiing at all (specially after that disastrous first try). I meant rent ANY cheap freestyle ski (not renting Völkl Karmas) to figure out if the kid enjoyed skiing. Demoing the skis I mentioned above is step 2.5 (after buying a cheap PR or 1080) IF he is to pick up skiing permanently at all.
post #5 of 22
FWIW - assuming you'll get anything more than a grunt out of a male teenager - I would actually ask him what's more important to him: to look cool (twintips with loud graphics) or to get skiing technique down properly. If he's serious about the idea of skiing, then a twintip isn't the obvious tool to learn on. If he's not particularly serious, don't waste any more money than you have to. He's not going to look particularly cool on twintips anyway if he can't control them in the first place
post #6 of 22
The K2 Public Enemy was the model of twintip I saw most at Bridger Bowl followed by the Salomon Gun and Rossignol Scratch FS. (There are lots of Volkl Karma's, too, but I rarely saw anyone in the terrain park on a pair.) All three would be a good choice for an all-around ski at Bridger that you can abuse in the park. Skis like the Seth Vicious & Scatch BC are too wide in my opinion for an everyday ski and too heavy for the terrain park.

I would shy away from recommending Pocket Rockets because an athletic skier with minimal skills could have problems with their soft tips. The recommendation of last year's 1080s as an inexpensive choice is a good one.
post #7 of 22
Thread Starter 
I am now being asked about opinions on the Line Prophet 80 for this guy. This ski has never been on my radar. Any feedback?
post #8 of 22
Why are you looking into twintips for someone who cant even ski yet, let alone use twins? Just becasue he'ssnowboarded or been a "daredevil" type in the past doesn't mean he'll be hucking huge and then landing switch to ride it out into the road his first year or even two of being on skis.
post #9 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky
Given the snowboarding background and the age (19), I recommended he try freestyle (he's a daredevil)
Oops.

So who is your daughter going to ski with while he's busy breaking his neck in the park? Watching him crash and burn gets old real fast.

Seriously, there are way better choices for a first ever pair of skis.

Here's what I tell everyone: Dynastar Omecarve 08, @ 165, 14 m radius. Really forgiving, and really really cheap, if you can still find 'em. 70 mm underfoot. They skid great, they carve great and there's not a lot of metal in them, so they're pretty light -- they pivot great. Highly underrated and overlooked. Should be able to find them with bindings for less than $250 brand new.
post #10 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Takecontrol618
Why are you looking into twintips for someone who cant even ski yet, let alone use twins? Just becasue he'ssnowboarded or been a "daredevil" type in the past doesn't mean he'll be hucking huge and then landing switch to ride it out into the road his first year or even two of being on skis.
He learned to snowboard this year, was doing trees and steeps by the third weekend. He's a former soccer player, football, baseball, etc. player. He is one of those natural athletes. I told him to just rent until he knows what he is doing as he won't know the difference for a while between one pair of skis and another. But the feeling seems to be that he will pick this up fairly quickly and maybe he should buy skis in the off season. Given that they put three days a week or more into skiing/boarding this season during the school year, more on the holidays, and that he's taking skiing as a course so he'll get some instruction, I'm sure he'll be ready to own his skis pretty soon. Is there some reason NOT to start out with twin tips? Will he be skiing in the back seat (like I see most doing) because of them?
post #11 of 22
Most of the kids on twintips are in the back seat because they work on their jumps much more than they work on their skiing technique. It has nothing to do with the skis. I wouldn't put anyone on Omecarve 08s for skiing Bridger Bowl since little of the mountain is groomed. You're better off on a forgiving twintip.
post #12 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rio
Most of the kids on twintips are in the back seat because they work on their jumps much more than they work on their skiing technique. It has nothing to do with the skis. I wouldn't put anyone on Omecarve 08s for skiing Bridger Bowl since little of the mountain is groomed. You're better off on a forgiving twintip.
I did not know that about Bridger. My apologies.

But, twintips do have long tails, so they are far more forgiving of skiing in the back seat than carving or racing skis would be -- there's more to lean back onto.
post #13 of 22
Thread Starter 
Also looking for feedback now on the Salomon Foil.
post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky
Also looking for feedback now on the Salomon Foil.
Personally, I think the Foil was a mistake by Salomon but I do know some people that love them. They seem to be a good finesse ski for lighter skiers that don't want to bomb through crud. They are advertised as the replacement for the Pocket Rockets but because of their much larger sidecut they behave completely different in powder & crud. In the Salomon line he would be much better off with last year's 1080, this year's 1080 Thuster (which is the same ski) or this year's 1080 Gun (which is made in the Pocket Rocket's molds but is a stiffer ski than the PR.)

I really can't comment on the Prophet 80 because I don't know anyone that has skied them. The Prophet 100 has a following around here but from what I've read the Prophet 80 is a much different ski.
post #15 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rio
Personally, I think the Foil was a mistake by Salomon but I do know some people that love them. They seem to be a good finesse ski for lighter skiers that don't want to bomb through crud. They are advertised as the replacement for the Pocket Rockets but because of their much larger sidecut they behave completely different in powder & crud. In the Salomon line he would be much better off with last year's 1080, this year's 1080 Thuster (which is the same ski) or this year's 1080 Gun (which is made in the Pocket Rocket's molds but is a stiffer ski than the PR.)

I really can't comment on the Prophet 80 because I don't know anyone that has skied them. The Prophet 100 has a following around here but from what I've read the Prophet 80 is a much different ski.
Thanks for all the help, Rio, I appreciate it.
post #16 of 22
Any good ski that is somewhat forgiving Twin tip would be fine for any beginner at this point.
Did you bring up the subject of boots with this Kid? Can you get him to look over this forum for some info on boots? Another Idea is talk to him about getting into a Freestyle camp this summer. A couple of weeks in a summer program would be a great start. It would be far better and a lot less cost to do a camp then a Life flight ride to the local ER. At Park City and The Canyons The number one call for Ski Patrol is some young guy who could barly ski or board going into the Terrain Park. He maybe the most talented athletic kid in the world. At 19 I'm sure he has a good size ego. As we all know skiing will humble him fast.
post #17 of 22
Thread Starter 
He's working construction this summer to pay for his college expenses. I don't think freestyle camps are in his budget.
post #18 of 22
Check your local Gart/Dicks/TSA for older 420s or Troublemakers, cheap.
post #19 of 22
I demod the foil in the largest size they had..185ish? I am 6' 197..level 8...

I knew..it would be not enough ski..sort of going in...A mistake...really a ski for someone under 150lbs..and wishing to have a super, super light and airy set up. 20% more squirlly than a pair of 175 P. Rockets...if that helps. [

quote=sibhusky]Thanks for all the help, Rio, I appreciate it.[/quote]
post #20 of 22
The newschool beginer, one word beater. That is all he will be doing for at least the first season. No point to putting any money into anything because it isn't going to be around long enough to be put to good use. My advice is to pick up a cheap pair of twins with good bindings, let him thrash the skis and buy a real pair next year and transfer the bindings. Most park skiers don't ride a ski for more than two years, a Trouble Maker or Scratch FS/BC are everywhere and can be picked up cheap. Ebay it up and remember most skis can be mounted three times.

PS: If he is short I got a pair of 163 1080's you can have for free, only mounted once.
post #21 of 22
Everyone is making great recommendations, but I have one more to add. I think the K2 Fujative would be an excellent choice. Its similar to the Public Enemy, but it is designed to be more of an intermediate ski that would serve him well until he really gets the hang of the sport. Then he would be ready for a more advanced ski like the Volkl Karma. Secondly, there is no disadvantage to twin tips whatsoever. They don't have 'Longer tails' like some in this thread have suggested, but a lot of park rats like to have their bindings mounted directly on the center of the ski which makes it seem like the skis have longer tails. I would not recomend this to someone who is trying to learn the basics. A center mount makes tricks easier because the ski is balanced which makes spinning and grinding rails easier. Anyway, that's my take on the situation. Get him a nice intermediate twintip that will last him a year or two. Oh yeah, intermediate skis are also cheaper, I think you can find the fujative for about $199 if you look hard enough.
post #22 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pilazzo
Get him a nice intermediate twintip that will last him a year or two. Oh yeah, intermediate skis are also cheaper, I think you can find the fujative for about $199 if you look hard enough.
Thanks for the info. By the way, I'm just the mom-not-yet-in-law here, he'll have to get them himself.
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