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Gender Imbalance - Page 7

post #181 of 332
[quote=jinx][quote=klkaye]
So -- there are male vacationers and occaisional recreators -- what continues to bring them to the slopes? I think it's machismo and bragging rights. Women have a lot less to prove, generally speaking, when it comes to physical activities.
Quote:

The part of ant's pots that i disagree with - here it again - machismo and bragging rights on the slopes. Most people who hit the slopes out of machismo or for bragging rights usually don't last long. They are the ones who can't carve a proper turn but only ski on blacks, in trees or in terrain parks - they also tend to have very short seasons.

I don't get why everyone else equates skiing with potential injury and death : A day on the slopes is in no way tantramount to purgatory.
So what's left then? Us women just can't handle cold feet as well as guys? We don't want to? That's not a 'female' thing at all, but entirely dependent on the upbringing - woman who's been camping/hiking/skiing as a child is probably used to slight inconveniences and not quite cushy surroundings and doesn't give slightly chilly feet a second thought.

jinx
I find your sentiments hard to follow, but perhaps I should point out that I've been skiing 41 years, and teaching for the past 9 seasons. And since I'm female, I get lots of lessons where women have specifically requested "a female".

Your experience might be different, but I've been teaching fulltime (that's teaching pretty-well every day for the entire winter) in 2 hemispheres, and my observations are what I base my opinions on.

naturally, as a female with 41 years skiing under my belt (and I guess I have to point out that in those 41 years, I've skiied 51 seasons) my personal feelings about skiing are different from the majority of females also. However, I form opinions with the data I observe from a number of sources, not just my own feelings. I've taught thousands of people, and most of the people taking ski lessons are women and children.

Your calling my opinons "bullcrap" is offensive, but given the evident difficulty you have expressing yourself clearly, I imagine getting angry when writing is something you experience frequently.
post #182 of 332

Ant

Ant, what do women say about lessons from men? What do they not like or is it maybe a respect issue. I want to teach and treat women as they would wish . What can men learn from this?
post #183 of 332
Well Garry, there is a big difference between how men and women experience skiing, at lower levels. Women and men who make it to upper levels are a whole different ball game, but most never get there, and there's more men who do than women.

Male and female fear is also different, and whenever I got these "request female" women, I'd ask them why they wanted a female. They were usually vague about it, they hadn't really examined their feelings before making that booking, it was more of a gut thing.

But they'd all had various experiences where they'd either realised, or sensed, that their male instructors did not understand how they felt when in a fearful situation.

Now, many of the men I've worked with are great with fear, they have learned that fear in women is something you can't just crash through, you have to approach it differently. but these women had all had enough experiences that they plainly did not want to repeat.

Fear is a huge issue with women and skiing. Skiing's dangerous!
post #184 of 332

Ant, one more time please

So maybe to approach this part in women would be to help them learn that their tools for control will make them feel safer and more confidant to go to next level. Not to talk to them like they are afraid but to grow in them confidence in their own ability to control speed from the beginning and that their safety is in their hands and support their efforts to learn this early. Wouldn't you try to replace their fears with the ability to counter them ,
therebye giving them full control of their destiny ,so to speak. I know this is a simplistic question to a complex situation but wouldn't this be a key to getting more women on the slopes?
post #185 of 332
Garry, your approach is an excellent one, in this situation. As they build skills, they build confidence, which in turn allows their skills to work better. But they HAVE to believe in their skills, to have confidence.

the problem here is that often, these women have had their wits scared out of them by some well meaning relative or friend/s, so you are battling with fear already present, and activated by the feeling of skiing.

If you can get a woman as a raw beginner, who has never had the skis on, it's so much easier, as your approach has them feeling good about skiing from the outset (despite the mental fears they had approaching the snow). Once the fear is implanted, it jumps back into centre stage whenever something happens.

I reckon everyone learns skiing better with Wins rather that struggle and failure, but for fearful people, it's key.
post #186 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by ant
Fear is a huge issue with women and skiing. Skiing's dangerous!
You write this like it's some sort of scientific fact. Fear is a huge issue for SOME women. (and some men) I doubt skiing is any more dangerous that driving your car, and I bet these women don't freak out about that. It's what you choose to percieve. If I chose to think of myself as weak and scared, I'm sure I could make it true.


I admit it. I've had days where I was bruised and battered and pissed off that I can't ride (it happens biking more than skiing) as fast as some of the guys. And I've sat there commisserating with other women and we bitch and moan about how it sucks, and why are women slower racing, and I wish I was stronger or taller or had faster reflexes or whatever. It just makes you MORE MISERABLE. Quit allowing yourself to be a victim of your circumstances and just go and do your best and quit thinking "I'm weak and afraid because I'm a woman - I can't help it". I guarantee you that no real expert woman in any sport is out there tearing it up and thinking how pathetic she is or wondering how she'd drive the kids to school with a torn ACL. (Not that they might not think that when they're not actually skiing - on occasion, anyway.) You have to learn to focus on what you're doing - if you're really focused, you don't have time to think about any external fears or distractions. THAT is what is so great and so addictive about skiing and biking - it's when your in the zone and have lost yourself because you cannot think about anything but the here and now.

My point is just that I think learning to truly focus on what you want to do is infinitely more valuable than spending time figuring out how to deal with fear.
post #187 of 332
altagirl, trekgirl, jinx and thatsagirl

ant, myself and others are here, contributing to these threads, because we're VERY enthusiastic about skiing. our contributions here are focusing on the "average female skier". can we please agree that we are not average? we're women who LOVE to ski and rack up more days in one season than some will get in their lives. we identify skiing as a "chosen sport".

there is a far, far greater percentage of women on ski slopes who are there as a vacationer or occaisional hobbyist. and, everyday we see people being treated by ski patrol for all manner of injuries. getting hurt skiing is actually pretty common. there is inherent risk. we've all had our share of injuries, right?

when is the last time you took a vacation, or joined friends on an outing, in which you had to sign liability waivers. it's hard to blow out your knee on the beach.

and so, for the average person ... the risk of injury is a real concern. for you to unilaterally dismiss that is unrealistic. I understand that you may not like that women/people have such fear/anxiety, but it's real nonetheless.

if you guys disagree with what ant and I have said -- spend a season teaching at your local hill. you may find it very interesting!
post #188 of 332
On the concept of not being a "normal" woman....

Boy, do I hear ya on that one.

As an insecure teen, I think I'd have given almost anything to feel "normal" and "in the group".

As a (somewhat less insecure) adult, I'm finally starting to accept and LIKE the fact that I'm not "normal". ( No snickers from the peanut gallery on that one!) At least being somewhat off the norm is NOT boring!!

Seriously though. I've taken up things that I had no role models for - my parent's don't ski, they don't bike. My mother never did anything physical or unladylike if she could avoid it. Peeing in the snow?? When I tore my ACL at 39, she only "half" joking told me that I should "act my age".

Thank GOD for all you women out there on this board and on the bike forums -- I want to be you when I grow up!! YOU are my role models now!!
post #189 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by klkaye
there is inherent risk. we've all had our share of injuries, right?

when is the last time you took a vacation, or joined friends on an outing, in which you had to sign liability waivers. it's hard to blow out your knee on the beach.
Not really. I blew out a knee in sand on a mountain bike. I've hurt myself several times slipping on ice in the driveway. I know people who are athletes who have slipped and fell on a wet bathroom floor or rolled over in bed wrong and tore a ligament. I know a woman who totally dislocated her knee (tearing every ligament) while washing her car. There's a guy on TGR who dislocated his knee and nearly lost his leg when he tripped and fell in the backyard. Maybe I'm the only woman who thinks this way, but I HONESTLY BELIEVE that you can hurt yourself just as bad in daily life as you can skiing. And therefore I choose not to worry about injuring myself while skiing - if it happens, it happens, but I'm going to have fun in the meantime.


Back on topic, I'm not claiming that any of us here are the average recreational skier. But I also don't think there's some genetic gap between me and the average recreational skier. I used to be an average recreational skier and I decided to move somewhere that I could ski every day, and met and married a man with the same love of the sport so we ski together every single weekend day and several weekdays every week, and took a pay cut and got a job that lets me ski a lot, blah, blah blah. I made the committment to come here, put forth the effort to improve, and I've learned that I have more fun (and am actually safer) when I'm thinking about skiing that about what I'm afraid of. I think anyone who chooses the same path can get the same (or probably much better) results.

Most women just aren't interested in any of that. Why? If you go back to my earlier posts in this thread, I think society trains women not to want that sort of thing. Some of us just manage to escape the influence.
post #190 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by jinx
somehow I can't get over the fact that this is utter bullcrap : do they WANT to be weak?
scientifically and anatomically speaking women have better resistance to extreme temperatures and a higher pain threshold. what's all this fear for then?! : jinx
Let me acknowledge that I am no crazy lady when it comes to skiing. I am 54 and chutes are not in my future. I like going fast and I'll do trees on the right day, however. But it's because at some point I had to teach myself to get tougher.

You ask about "wanting to be weak". Well, back when I was growing up and I hit 6th grade, my mom had me stop playing football and climbing trees because nice young ladies didn't do those things. Younger girls like my daughter, who have been encouraged to be physically active all along are far likelier to ski the gnarly stuff than women who grew up trained by those 1950's moms. We had to give up the fun stuff and learn to cook and knit, so plunging down the steeps is a tough step for us.
post #191 of 332
Thatsagirl wrote:

"So perhaps rather than saying there's a difference in learning to ski as a child vs. as an adult, we could say being athletic as a child vs. not being athletic as a child. Even if you didn't ski as a child, if you were athletic as a child, learning to ski as an adult would be easier than a non-athletic child learning to ski as an adult. Being athletic, you've already settled those mind games of fear, getting hurt, being aggressive, pushing your limits, being competitive, etc. But if you were never athletic, learning to ski enters you into a whole new realm of physicality and mind games. Just learning to ski is being brave and stepping outside one's comfort zone, if that is the case. "

Yes, I think that makes a lot of sense. I'm an adult leaner who has never been athletic. My sport as a kid was swimming, which I had to give up at 12 when the chlorine started blinding me for half an hour after coming out of the pool. And then a bit of sailing (before education got in the way). I'm actually a musician/linguist so all my spare time growing up was spent in orchestras and bands, not outside. Although I did do a fair amount of ice skating at university. So even though I've done some sport, the essential part of my life, the live it and breathe it part, has been music. BUT I'm now an avid skier and beginning to head into advanced territory now (although probably never expert), since I'm lucky enough to live close to the mountains.

Altagirl wrote:

"I doubt skiing is any more dangerous that driving your car, and I bet these women don't freak out about that. It's what you choose to percieve. "

Skiing may not be ay more dangerous than driving, but we all have experience of not crashing in cars since we were little and being in a car is a "normal" activity. Yes it's perception. Skiing for me is a relatively alien activity so it takes me a long time to get to the stage where it's "normal" and "easy". And "easy" is the goal for me, because when any particular slope/gradient/conditions are easy, then I believe I can do it (absolutely, Ant!) and then I'm confident I can do it. I don't suffer from fear very much, but I do suffer from a massive lack of belief in my skiing abilities. It's a vicious circle, you need to do sth lots to believe you can do it, but you need to believe you can do it to venture there in the first place. And there is also a huge difference between knowing rationally that you can do something and actually believing it
post #192 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by klkaye
altagirl, trekgirl, jinx and thatsagirl

ant, myself and others are here, contributing to these threads, because we're VERY enthusiastic about skiing. our contributions here are focusing on the "average female skier". can we please agree that we are not average? we're women who LOVE to ski and rack up more days in one season than some will get in their lives. we identify skiing as a "chosen sport".

there is a far, far greater percentage of women on ski slopes who are there as a vacationer or occaisional hobbyist. and, everyday we see people being treated by ski patrol for all manner of injuries. getting hurt skiing is actually pretty common. there is inherent risk. we've all had our share of injuries, right?

when is the last time you took a vacation, or joined friends on an outing, in which you had to sign liability waivers. it's hard to blow out your knee on the beach.

and so, for the average person ... the risk of injury is a real concern. for you to unilaterally dismiss that is unrealistic. I understand that you may not like that women/people have such fear/anxiety, but it's real nonetheless.

if you guys disagree with what ant and I have said -- spend a season teaching at your local hill. you may find it very interesting!
You are absolutly right! There's nothing average about the women who are contributing to this thread. We are either enthusiast or advanced skiers or both.

The recreational woman skier who runs to the lodge or the local shopping center when the weather gets a little bad or when the snow conditions aren't just right, or when the sun is too bright.... Those women ski, but they are not "skiers".
Those women deserve some credit for being out there. They are making an attempt to be with their family and friends even though it's not their first choice of activity.

As for me. If I never enter another shopping center in my life I'd be ok. Don't take away my skis! If you try, I will be a force to be reconed with!:
post #193 of 332
ant, I'm sorry if I offended you, the 'bullcrap' was not meant in regards to your opinion, but to the situation itself - the fear that seems to be such a roadblock for for women and mostly the fact that any small disomfort like cold feet can actually stop an average woman from skiing.
you certainly have had more experience then me with this (I'm 23 ), so you probably know better how the average women approaches learning how to ski. My gripe is mostly with the fact that there is no need for women to be more fearful then men, no need for them to handle cold feet worse then men etc it's not genetic, it's not part of being a women.. it's a stunted upbringing! blame it on the parents, on society, on what men want, on whatever, and hope that for the next generation, women will be encouraged to grow to their full potential and not stunt their growth to fit some mold.

rant over.
i'm sensiteve when it comes to this, i've felt like an outsider often enaugh because i dared to be capable and independent. still do on occsion, and it p*sses me off :

jinx
post #194 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by klkaye
altagirl, trekgirl, jinx and thatsagirl

ant, myself and others are here, contributing to these threads, because we're VERY enthusiastic about skiing. our contributions here are focusing on the "average female skier". can we please agree that we are not average? we're women who LOVE to ski and rack up more days in one season than some will get in their lives. we identify skiing as a "chosen sport".

there is a far, far greater percentage of women on ski slopes who are there as a vacationer or occaisional hobbyist. and, everyday we see people being treated by ski patrol for all manner of injuries. getting hurt skiing is actually pretty common. there is inherent risk. we've all had our share of injuries, right?

when is the last time you took a vacation, or joined friends on an outing, in which you had to sign liability waivers. it's hard to blow out your knee on the beach.

and so, for the average person ... the risk of injury is a real concern. for you to unilaterally dismiss that is unrealistic. I understand that you may not like that women/people have such fear/anxiety, but it's real nonetheless.

if you guys disagree with what ant and I have said -- spend a season teaching at your local hill. you may find it very interesting!
You've addressed me in this post: I would like to know what I said that put me in the ranks of saying I disagree with what you and ant have said about the issues the average woman deals with. : I have not said anything about women shouldn't be afraid, women shouldn't be concerned with injury, etc. In fact, if you read my last post in which I quoted eng_ch, I even provided some insight as to why some women who learn as adults might find it intimidating. I also have mentioned my own head games that I deal with on the mountain, how hard it was for me as a female to go against what peers and society told me was "acceptable" for women, how society does not teach women to be "risk takers," and how important it is for guys to introduce their wives/girlfriends to skiing in ways that will promote enjoyment, such as through women's clinics (like Phil did ). Not once have I said anything about what you, ant and other instructors have contributed to this thread.
post #195 of 332
I've been involved in skiing as a certified instructor for longer than Jinx has been on Earth, and my perspective is that more women are skiing and taking it seriously than ever before. Our women's programs at Bridger do a booming business, as I expect they do elsewhere. At ESA women students are almost equally represented with men, and our goal is to get our coaching staff to those proportions too. It's a sport that women can do equally as well as men, so it's no wonder that more women are getting into it, having a blast, and in many cases blowing the doors off their male counterparts.

This is the new generation of women skiers.
post #196 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo
I've been involved in skiing as a certified instructor for longer than Jinx has been on Earth
when i grow up i want to be able to say that too

Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo
This is the new generation of women skiers.
now if that was entirely true, there would be no point to this thread. but i guess maybe we're getting there.

jinx
post #197 of 332
I wonder if you could guess everyone's ages by their responses on this thread ... ie, the older you are (older being merely a relative term), the more likely you are to think society has much bearing on how women "should act." The younger you are, the sillier this notion seems ....

(I'm not saying anyone on here is AFFECTED by what society expects of women, but that they are more apt to see it as a factor.)

On the other hand -- it must have a great deal to do with what our own mothers told us (not necessarily modeled), as well. My mom has skied for more than 50 years, but she is the classic "woman" skier: slow, controlled, nervous. She's very touchy about her boots, doesn't carry her own skis, quits in bad weather .... This is who raised me.

We are completely different people when it comes to sports, yet she never discouraged any of my athletic pursuits, even as I was the only girl playing on boys' baseball and soccer teams (well, she wouldn't let me play tackle football when I was 8).

I am not sure what I'm saying -- except that it's both nature and nurture. Even in today's environment, I don't think my mom would have been anything but a slow, controlled intermediate skier, because of her NATURE. I think there are a lot of women like that, no matter how they are NURTURED. She isn't the kind of person to say, Oh, girls shouldn't DO that (except with tackle football), but that didn't mean SHE wanted to do it.

Then there are those of us (many of us on this board) who by nature just don't have a lot of fear. We don't care about "nurture." We did what we wanted to.

It's the ones in the middle that are the new generation -- imo. There was a conflict between nature and nurture that is lessening; the nurture (or expectations) aspect is changing.
post #198 of 332
Thatsagirl,

Sorry that I perceived a division that didn't exist.

kiersten
post #199 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by jinx
when i grow up i want to be able to say that too

jinx
Don't grow up...thats no fun.
post #200 of 332
Hi jinx (haha, been dying to say that),

I graduated high school just as Title IX legislation was passed, ten years before women used Title IX to lever open the door to the clubhouse/locker room. Those were the Dark Ages compared to now. But even then the sport of skiing was an arena where women could shine. I didn't play varsity sports but I was on a ski team and a swim team. There were plenty of outstanding female role models in ski racing and swimming in those days. In fact, because there are so many more sports for girls today, skiing probably got a greater proportion of interest from female athletes than it does now.

There may actually be a really good balance of gender participation in skiing. The cautiousness that women bring to skiing may actually contribute to longer lifetime participation, once they get past the initial risk/benefit proposition. I do know, as someone pointed out, women control the family checkbook and make the lioness's share of vacation decisions, so it behooves the ski industry to understand what makes mama happy.

Not disagreeing with anything that's been said, just sayin'. (With respect to Notorious Spag's wife.)
post #201 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
Don't grow up...thats no fun.
This dear ladies is exactly why this thread was started.

Men have a natural inclination to respond like this

Quote:
Originally Posted by jinx
when i grow up i want to be able to say that too
Women naturally concur that someday, you have to grow up.

I've been successful at fighting that inclination to grow up.
post #202 of 332
I am a little late to this party (can't ski here so we had to go to Belize) but segbrown's allusion to nature vs. nurture gives me the perfect opening. As a geneticist (and father of two daughters) I am very sensitive to the differences between those of us with one vs. two X chromosomes. IMO alot of our behavior (including how we respond to fear and stress) is hard-wired. Go into a day care center - you'll see the girls playing together nicely with toys (be they dolls or dump trucks) while the boys are hitting themselves and each other with blocks. Boys will similarly respond to a fear-inducing situtation more aggressively than girls (ON AVERAGE) and will therefore more often (ON AVERAGE) both a) gain the skills to master the situation (after a few crashes) and b) enjoy the associated adrenalin rush.

It is the ON AVERAGE qualifier that is key. This refers to the population as a whole, and not to any individual. There is no reason (other than genetic strength differences) that any woman cannot be better than any man at skiing (or anything else). And that is pretty clear, because there are plenty of chicks that can rip. (See, for example, http://www.kristenulmer.com/photos/?album=skiing)

altho I must say this one is a favorite: http://www.kristenulmer.com/photos/?album=skiing&img=20
post #203 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by klkaye
Thatsagirl,

Sorry that I perceived a division that didn't exist.

kiersten
No problem. You certainly made me go back and read all my posts to see if I said something that didn't come out right!

That said, I think there is a genuine frustration among those of us who are avid skiers about the fact that many women are afraid of skiing, injury, etc. We love the sport so much and want other women to share in the joy. Which is why, I think, we are ALL being so passionate in this thread.

Thatsagirl
post #204 of 332
Maybe there is also something about learning styles here. When you learned to swim, did you get in shallow end, learn that you could float and only go out of your depth once you could actually swim? Or did you dive in the deep end on the sink or swim philosophy? Is that representative of a typical gender difference? Or am I thinking too much again?
post #205 of 332
there's a great book: Why Men Don't Listen and Women Can't Read Maps: How We're Different and What to Do About It
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/076...Fencoding=UTF8

The Pease's wrote this book together after about 20 years of research. I like this book because it's not all the pop-psychy mumbo jumbo. It's a book that explains the results of experiements and discusses the different ways male and female brains work and are mapped.

One thing that I think correlates to this discussion: Vision and eyes.

Studies show that Men can see farther in one direction than women and women have wider peripheries (up/down and side to side). Conclusion -- men are less distracted by, or fail to see, what is around them as they focus on what's in front of them -- what they are looking at. The feeling is that these skills/abilities were developed because men hunted and women maintained the home and nurtured. Men had to be able to spot an animal off in the distance or just sit and stare for hours whereas women had to move about an area and keep an eye on their children while they cooked, etc.

So, when women ski -- are they more aware of what's going on around them ... scanning the whole trail for the place that looks best to turn? Hearing and seeing people whizzing by -- are they in control? And, men ... do they look down the hill to the bottom seeing that as the place they are going -- and nothing else?

And, in terms of gender -- masculine and feminine. Some women are more masculine and some men are more feminine.
post #206 of 332
[quote=segbrown]I wonder if you could guess everyone's ages by their responses on this thread ... ie, the older you are (older being merely a relative term), the more likely you are to think society has much bearing on how women "should act." The younger you are, the sillier this notion seems ....

You have it dead on segbrown. We're at least 2 generations of women here and I'm sure some who fall in between. I'm 50 and learned to ski at the same time as my kid. My mom's reaction was to tell me that I was too old to do this and didn't I know that it takes longer to heal at my age (close to 40 at the time). Fortunately I ignored her. I did not play sports as a kid, since there weren't any. I did however own a several pairs of white gloves. On the other hand, my daughter has been on teams since she was very little and skied since she was 3. Her cosmetic of choice is dermatone and since she races, she’s regularly cold, uncomfortable and bruised. She tunes her own skis and knows the pros and cons of each model race ski.

I often thought that girls didn’t think of a sport of being for boys only anymore, but when my daughter learned to race, there were 2 women and a man who ran the course and the class was ½ girls, ½ boys. When the women left, the class was run by only male instructors and the class was now all boys. The type of instruction didn’t change, but without a woman instructor, they couldn’t get girls to join. Absence of a role model perhaps? I couldn’t believe that 7 yr olds would actually think that racing was a boy’s only activity, but they now did. I’m sure this applies to the adult women too. A woman instructor is more like you, small talk is easier and lets face it, when you learn as an adult, you often end up looking really really ridiculous at times, and having a woman instructor is probably a comfort thing.

What the younger girls and women have learned since childhood, a lot of older women are trying for the first time, and we’re trying it with older bodies that we’ve often neglected. I’ve had friends who were in much better shape then me stop skiing because it was “too hard” and they felt “too old”. Many people think that they just can’t become athletic for the first time when they’re past 40, and others fortunately don’t care about looking less then dignified while learning to ski. Yes, people have snickered at me, but they can just go out there and get life. This one’s mine, and I’m going to spend it skiing.
post #207 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by altagirl
Heh - and this also made me think that I should try listening to myself more often when I'm scared. A big part of the thrill of DH mountain biking for me has been that it creates a regular peer pressure situation that coerces me to do things that are over my skill level (and thus quite scary, though it makes you learn faster). Which sometimes results in my having a concussion or needing stitches or massive hematomas, or some such thing, but I get such a rush from having done it, I go right back out and do it again.

I guess if I were "normal", I'd spend a lot less time in the emergency room.
I just had to laugh when I read this....I'm sitting here with bruised ribs, a huge hematoma on my thigh, and a "road rashed" right leg from stunt biking on Saturday. The hubby and both sons did it, so I had too, of course .
post #208 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by volklgirl
I just had to laugh when I read this....I'm sitting here with bruised ribs, a huge hematoma on my thigh, and a "road rashed" right leg from stunt biking on Saturday. The hubby and both sons did it, so I had too, of course .
OUCH!

You should have seen the bruise I got on my hip when I was skiing at Big Mountain at the end of March. It started out tiny and grew to be about the size of a large grapefruit. : One of my friends who was with us said to me, "You should buy an accessory to go with that thing!" One afternoon I was getting into the hot tub, which was occupied by a woman and her husband, and they couldn't hide their dismay at the bruise. She asked me if it hurt and I said, "Only when I try to sleep on that side." A few minutes later, their two young sons got in the hot tub with us. We were chatting away and I said, "Well, we've got to go get ready for dinner." As I climbed out, one of the boys said, "Momma, look at that lady's monster bruise! It's got a gazillion colors too!" She tried to shush him, telling him it was rude to say anything, but I laughed and said, "It'll only get prettier before it goes away!" He grinned! He asked me how I did it and I told him how I caught an edge and slammed into the ground. He said, "Oh, I've done that. It really hurts! But it will feel better soon." Cute kid!

Anyway, it took more than 2 weeks for that bruise to disappear...
post #209 of 332
My daughter the racer, took in her old xrays and turned them into an art project.
post #210 of 332
Bruises on the bone can take months to heal. I slipped on some sheet ice just by our letter box before Christmas and landed right on my hip/top of thigh and even now at the end of April I still can't lie on that hip comfortably for some Pilates exercises. It's only a few weeks ago that I stopped feeling it in bed
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