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KISS my powder - Page 5

post #121 of 142
Thread Starter 
AHA! (Light goes on). Thanks, Rusty, it's becoming clearer.
No reason to stop hijacking if it's going to be this simple and instructive!

No wonder I fall down. Going too slow!
post #122 of 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonni
AHA! (Light goes on). Thanks, Rusty, it's becoming clearer.
No reason to stop hijacking if it's going to be this simple and instructive!

No wonder I fall down. Going too slow!
Yah - I did at least learn that one in Utah this past winter Bonni -- need a bit of speed and need to keep aiming everything more down the fall line. When I got sideways, I stopped and fell over!! But at least in the West the falls are SOFT
post #123 of 142
Don't get too cocky over the soft snow. I got a cuncusion in the soft snow. It was also up to my armpits when I had to struggle up to my skis. I've heard those trees and rocks can be pretty hard too.
post #124 of 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhcooley
Todd is also one of the most enthusiastic skiers I've ever skied with. You can tell if he thinks you're OK, because both his critique and the lines he chooses will be brutal. (Loudly: "This clinic is about VERTICAL DROP!!")
last winter i went out with him in a "short radius turn clinic". he headed down norwegion and made twenty or thirty great turns.

i followed and thought my turns were pretty good.

as i passed him he continued to look up the hill at the next skier and said, "rusty......those were the shitiest turns that i have ever seen.".

i replied with, "could we at least start the day by saying good morning?"

he is without a doubt one of my favorite people, teachers, skiers, and clinicians.
post #125 of 142
my problem is that i have to lean way way back....as soon as my tips sink i start falling face forward. well i guess thats my problem right now. as soon as i get passed that there will be another im sure
post #126 of 142
o yeah and how deep does it have to be before i have to get fat skiis im using the recons right now
post #127 of 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bingers View Post
my problem is that i have to lean way way back....as soon as my tips sink i start falling face forward. well i guess thats my problem right now. as soon as i get passed that there will be another im sure
What kind of skis are you on? I was in the Alps last year with my short SL skis and in some deep heavy snow I had the same problem. In fluffy powder everything worked as before, just had to pay serious attention to balance.
post #128 of 142
i was on b3's 162 cm i am 160 pounds...maybe i needed to go longer.....anyway i picked up a pair of 167 recons for this year....less fat than the b3 but i needed to enjoy it on harder snow too.
post #129 of 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
What kind of skis are you on? I was in the Alps last year with my short SL skis and in some deep heavy snow I had the same problem. In fluffy powder everything worked as before, just had to pay serious attention to balance.
Those Heads are great powder skis if you mount them on the boot center mark
post #130 of 142
Apparently I don't ski Powder like most skiers. The first thing I do is find my center mark(balance), stay collected get those skis on the base under the Snow and speed is a product of good soft snow skiing. That would be on skis 78mm to 65mm underfoot. I don't really care for wide skis.
post #131 of 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bingers View Post
my problem is that i have to lean way way back....as soon as my tips sink i start falling face forward. well i guess thats my problem right now. as soon as i get passed that there will be another im sure
Instead of changing your balance to control the skis try changing the pressure on them when they start to dive. Skiing in manky, deep or variable snow requires subtle pressure awareness and management. Soft supple legs are required,,,stiff will definetly make your tips dive when the resistance increases and the skis slow down, because your body wants to keep moving the same speed. Reducing the pressure on the skis reduces the resistance and thus balance stays intact and the skis keep moving with you. Just remember that what gets shorter must also get longer, so for everytime you flex you will also need to extend. slow continuous deliberate movements are key here,,,,like a dance. If you stay moving in the lower joints (ankles, knees, and hips) then the pressure adjustments will be able to be made on the fly.
post #132 of 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bingers View Post
my problem is that i have to lean way way back....as soon as my tips sink i start falling face forward. well i guess thats my problem right now. as soon as i get passed that there will be another im sure
Instead of leaning way back to get the tips up, try picking up the ski tips by raising your toes (closing your ankles).

Similar to water skiing, when you are starting up, snow skis often do not have enough momentum to "plane" across the snow. As a water skier gains speed from a standing start, they transition from weight back to toes up to centered. Skiers need to make similar adjustments in powder.

Powder skiers who sit back never let their skis get on plane. If they just move their weight forward, their skis are not going fast enough to plane and they nose dive. If you move your weight forward, but keep the tips up slightly by raising your toes, the skis will start to "plane" and pick up enough speed to prevent the tips from submarining. Once you get going fast enough, the skis generate enough lift that you can allow them to briefly dip below the surface during your turns without having them get stuck and cause face plants. In some powder conditions you actually want to drive the tips down to the subsurface and have them rebound back to the top layer. If you're not aggressive enough with this move, you won't hit bottom and you will get stuck.

A lot depends on the snow consistency, but in general you can adjust for grabbier powder snow by raising the angle of the skis by raising your toes instead of moving your weight back.
post #133 of 142
I haven't had any chance to ski powder except for sniffing out bits on the side of trails - I found the transitions between powder and packed disconcerting because of the different amounts of friction. However at Winterpark earlier this month I got to experience about 6" to 8" of nice untouched powder in the trees on Mary Jane - man, talk about smoooooth. Hopefully one of these days I'll luck into a wide slope covered in the stuff.
post #134 of 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
Instead of leaning way back to get the tips up, try picking up the ski tips by raising your toes (closing your ankles).

Similar to water skiing, when you are starting up, snow skis often do not have enough momentum to "plane" across the snow. As a water skier gains speed from a standing start, they transition from weight back to toes up to centered. Skiers need to make similar adjustments in powder.

Powder skiers who sit back never let their skis get on plane. If they just move their weight forward, their skis are not going fast enough to plane and they nose dive. If you move your weight forward, but keep the tips up slightly by raising your toes, the skis will start to "plane" and pick up enough speed to prevent the tips from submarining. Once you get going fast enough, the skis generate enough lift that you can allow them to briefly dip below the surface during your turns without having them get stuck and cause face plants. In some powder conditions you actually want to drive the tips down to the subsurface and have them rebound back to the top layer. If you're not aggressive enough with this move, you won't hit bottom and you will get stuck.

A lot depends on the snow consistency, but in general you can adjust for grabbier powder snow by raising the angle of the skis by raising your toes instead of moving your weight back.
This is one of the most exciting powder tips i have seen and cant wait to try it out. Thank you.
post #135 of 142

How to ski powder?

Come out west, Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, Taos, etc., and take a lesson from a pro who can assess what you need. Reading about it doesn't get it done. Just do it!

You can do it, it's easy.

Ken
post #136 of 142
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kemrick View Post
Come out west, Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, Taos, etc., and take a lesson from a pro who can assess what you need. Reading about it doesn't get it done. Just do it!

You can do it, it's easy.

Ken
Do us all a favor.

Take a few minutes to read this forum and especially this thread, get to know the people here, and then post. Please, please don't post drivel without substance like this and expect us to listen. Ain't gonna happen. :

Now go do some homework and stop back in so we can welcome you.:
post #137 of 142
Things to remember when skiing powder...

post #138 of 142
Tip of the week -Ski more powder.

Or as Bob B has said. If you want to get good at skiing powder you're going to have to eat some
post #139 of 142
mtbakerskier
2. BALANCE ON BOTH SKIS

This is number one. You must balance on both skis. Here is a slightly challenging drill to practice this on groomed:

make turns using the INSIDE EDGE OF YOUR INSIDE ski
you will find it really difficult. but if you master this you will be able to transfer the skill to powder. you will probably have to lift your outside ski up into the air to balance/force yourself to do this.
post #140 of 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reinhard View Post
mtbakerskier
2. BALANCE ON BOTH SKIS

This is number one. You must balance on both skis. Here is a slightly challenging drill to practice this on groomed:

make turns using the INSIDE EDGE OF YOUR INSIDE ski
you will find it really difficult. but if you master this you will be able to transfer the skill to powder. you will probably have to lift your outside ski up into the air to balance/force yourself to do this.
the charleston is a great way to improve 50 /50 balance. try to pratice running med to long turn skilz-drilz if you don't have any training gates use objects on the snow like bits of trees.
post #141 of 142

Hey Bonni, having fun yet? Leigh and I just got back from Wyoming traveling west on I90. It snowed most of the week we traveled and we got fresh snow for Bridger Bowel at Bozeman and Silver in ID. I have never seen such beautiful snow! Dry, soft and it made powder skiing a joy that I have never known. You know what the snow is like in the NW...wet, heavy almost grabs your ski as you try to get up to speed but that Montana snow was a wonder to behold. We did not get any fresh snow at Big Sky but this trip was a real eye opener about quality of snow. When you plan a week off don't decide where until you are ready to go. Then check the weather reports and follow the snow.

BTW, I never could ski powder but began to study how I made turns. Found out I was turning with my heal instead of my toes. Now my turns are better and I can ski powder. Who knew?

post #142 of 142

I think the advice I got 30+ years ago still applies:

 

Hands in front, not so many turns and point-um! .... oh and ski a lot of powder.

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