or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

About ski reviews?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Hi,
Reading ski reviews by “SkiPress magazine”, “Ski-Review” and “Real skiers” left me confused. Their opinion on the same ski (Fischer RX4 in my case) varies from “Low level cruiser; best rented” (Real skiers) to “It’s stable, versatile, forgiving, fast…” (SkiPress magazine, Fall 2005, Vol 5, No 1).
Is there a problem with my reading or is it due to the amount of “sponsorship” they get from the companies? I can’t DEMO them all, so I have to get SOME info from “professional” reviews, don’t I?
BTW, speaking of DEMO, is it a common option in North America only? It seems to me that in Europe you can rent a ski, and then, should you decide to buy it; the rental cost will be taken off the ski price. None of the skiers I spoke with about Europe knew about an option of taking a ski for a few hours. Does anyone here can comment on that? I would love to test drive both RX6 and RX8, but Europe is 3-4 hours away and the U.S. - 12 hours... :
post #2 of 20
Hey , in EU there is no problem demoing skis but you have to pay a little bit , not so meny , say 15€ for 6 hours . I found that option in Italy , Austria , Czech Republique , Poland and Slovakia .
I don't rate tests ( not realized by myself ) high but those done by Keelty & Co are in my opinion most valuable .
post #3 of 20
Real skiers is generally objective compared to other sources. Real skiers does not cover low-end & mid-level products especially well, however. His target audience are often level 7 or higher skiers, so he is usually brief in describing gear that is designed for other markets.

Cheers,

Michael
post #4 of 20
I don't know much about renting at the mountain but the local ski shop I frequent gives you half of the demo rental fee's back if you purchase skis from them that year.....up to something like $200. You can rent 3-4 different demo skis for a weekend to recover 1/2 of the rental fee.

Being a newb, I opted not to demo at all and just went with a high quality ski. After my skills develop (if they ever do ), I'll probably take the demo route to pick out my next skis.
post #5 of 20
Eyal_Shahar, demos are the most effective way of finding skis that you really like given your skiing right now. However, you are also likely to find input from folks like those here at EpicSki to really be helpful, as well. With a clear description of your skiing and your goals (see the FAQ in this forum), experts and helpful members will be able to give you quite a bit of guidance.

With respect to the RX4, I'd encourage you to move up to the RX6, at least.
post #6 of 20
Highly personal opinions about my own sources if demos are tough:

Agree that Real Skiers is a great review site, populist, better for intermediates/advanced than beginners or experts. Very mainstream; don't bother if you like skis you can huck off cliffs or take to the park. Keelty admits a bias toward Heads. Which is far better than unstated bias. I'd buy cold on their rec, but you might find the ski is less demanding than you assumed from the review. If that makes any sense.

Epic threads here are simply in class by themselves. You can get a very reliable take on most skis by comparing several reviews. As a new poster, helps to match the background/ski style of the reviewer to the opinion (say, ex-racer now on Atomics tends to prefer, surprise, stiffer powerful skis), and don't rely on one post - some here have strooong brand loyalty. But unlike most mags, these reviews also tend to describe ability, style, current skis, conditions. If you simply can't demo, and are low-advanced to expert, you can trust these guys more than ANYPLACE, including most BM stores, for a cold buy. If you're beginner-intermediate, though, they'll want to put you on a fairly demanding ski for your ability. Then, compare them to Real Skier...

Of the two big mags, IMO, Skiing reviews fit my own likes a LITTLE better than Ski and they cover way more types of skis (odd, cuz they're owned by the same company). But both are stupid-cute about their descriptions and inconsistent year to year on same model (5* or RX8 for instance). Ski in particular sucks. I actually buy review issue of Skiing, but don't spread it around.

Ski Canada is better than either because it has thorough numerical grades, includes personal prefs, style/background of each tester. But they have a limited set of skis to test (no Volkls, Dynastars, Stocklis, for instance). Do nice twin-tip/park tests. Hard to find the print mag, and site runs a year behind on posting reviews unless you subscribe.

SkiPressWorld.com, by contrast, tests everything that moves, is current, has nice numerical system. But overly cutesy descriptions and bizzarely long test skis every year (as in longest lengths made, then reviewer complains about tough to make make short turns). They, like Ski Canada, tend to like skis we underplay, like Rossi's, and aren't always as sold on skis we tend to adore, like Atomics, Elans, and Volkls. So good contrast with Epic.

Freeskier(Freestyle? can't recall) is decent if you want very alternative take on a powder/backside ski. Often valid critiques, great coverage of small companies. But seriously afflicted with the hip hop urban I'm so cool writing, so read DESPITE style, unless you think you're all that.

SkiReviewsUK.com is a sales site, but has lots of down to earth, often idiosyncratic, reviews that seem valid for many skiers. Highly opinionated about particular lines within brands (thinks Volkl's AC line is way overrated, for instance), but I like the way they aren't afraid to yawn at particular popular skis and laud others no one else thinks about. On the other hand, some reviews are too offhand, obviously written after talking to someone else who actually skied.

If you read French, Ski Pass Reviews.com are interesting, thick description (after all, they're French), useful numerical scores, tons of skis, and they test some you'll never get reviewed here, like Movement or Line. Like above and Canadian sites, seem more in touch with new school/freestyle/freeski readers than here and Real Skiers.


Hope this helps. Try to demo anyway, after you've narrowed the list...
post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eyal_Shahar
Hi,
Reading ski reviews by “SkiPress magazine”, “Ski-Review” and “Real skiers” left me confused. Their opinion on the same ski (Fischer RX4 in my case) varies from “Low level cruiser; best rented” (Real skiers) to “It’s stable, versatile, forgiving, fast…” (SkiPress magazine, Fall 2005, Vol 5, No 1).
Is there a problem with my reading or is it due to the amount of “sponsorship” they get from the companies? I can’t DEMO them all, so I have to get SOME info from “professional” reviews, don’t I?
BTW, speaking of DEMO, is it a common option in North America only? It seems to me that in Europe you can rent a ski, and then, should you decide to buy it; the rental cost will be taken off the ski price. None of the skiers I spoke with about Europe knew about an option of taking a ski for a few hours. Does anyone here can comment on that? I would love to test drive both RX6 and RX8, but Europe is 3-4 hours away and the U.S. - 12 hours... :
Be aware that skipress groups skis into categories and then scores them compared to other skis in that same category, and by people who fit that category. A beginner ski ranked as very stable will not be more stable than a race ski ranked as unstable for example.
post #8 of 20
Thread Starter 

So, it's not the question of waht's best but what best fit...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost
Be aware that skipress groups skis into categories and then scores them compared to other skis in that same category, and by people who fit that category. A beginner ski ranked as very stable will not be more stable than a race ski ranked as unstable for example.
Yes, I have notice that skis are categorized. It was clear to me that when they call my RX4 “fast” it’s not to say they are FAST . But then, am I fast? Isn’t the fist question I should ask when coming to choose my ski “what is my current skiing level and where do I see myself in the next say, two seasons?” I think it was Michael who wrote me “...if you are happy with your RX4…” which means, the way I see it, “use what’s best for you”. I guess that an old pickup truck is a lot better in carrying vegetables to the market place than a Ferrari, so it’s the issue of “best is what best fits”, isn't it?
Now, let’s assume that I estimate my skiing abilities as “Intermediate ++”, (my woman say that for her I’ll be always be the best, so I am relived here… ), I ski Europe’s reds and some blacks, and I already have the RX4 (previous year model - bought them last November), is it worth using them for the next couple of years and then move to more advanced model? Will the RX4 hold me back? Does it worth spending the money now on RX6 and use them for the next few years? Let’s say that I bought the RX8 right from the beginning, wouldn’t they be “too much” for me and therefore prevent me from getting better?
How will I defined what skis are good for me now and are good skis to “grow up with”?
Thanks.
post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eyal_Shahar
Will the RX4 hold me back? Does it worth spending the money now on RX6 and use them for the next few years? Let’s say that I bought the RX8 right from the beginning, wouldn’t they be “too much” for me and therefore prevent me from getting better?
I asked a similar question awhile back.

I'm a complete noob to skiing....started middle March of this year and opted to just go for it. I got SUV 12.1 (rather than SUV 6.1 or 8.1) skis after my first ski day and haven't looked back. No, I'm not able to handle them as well as I should but I get down the mountain without injury...most times . I do find that they behave much better if I go faster than my 7 yr old.....going slow on those skis is A LOT of work. Of course, going faster has lead to a few more falls.....:. But making mistakes is how we learn....I keep catching the downhill edge of the uphill ski 'cause I'm too inexperienced to turn the uphill ski on the uphill edge.....

Anyrate, I think from my own experience and what I garnered from others - if you are well coordinated, aggressive and like to push yourself but don't have the budget to change your skis often, get skis that are a level ahead. If not, you might fare better with skis that are more tame.
post #10 of 20
Eyal Shahar, First let me say welcome to epic ski.
are you happy with your RX4 skis? If so don't let the reviews good or bad bother you. At this point in your skiing career buying a so called better ski won't improve your skiing. Your money would be better spent on a few lessons. There is a saying here, "It's the Indian not the Arrow." In other words, a really good skier can do some amazing things with on a bad ski. A really bad skier won't be made into a great skier by buying a top notch ski. In fact skiing a ski that is to advanced for your current ability just might hinder your progress.
post #11 of 20

what Utah49 said....

Eyal-
I would say that you are probably fine with the Rx4's and should make a decision about trading your current Fischers in for something different only if you are trying to work on something different in your next ski season. I agree fully with Utah49's post above. However, if you expect that in the next season you will have lots of time to get out and ski (maybe a good snow year is forecast for Ramat HaHermon?), you have solidified your skills on groomed terrain, and you are interested in venturing off-piste, you might consider moving to a ski with a fatter waist, for example.

I would use the reviews as a guide, but they are not necessarily always looking at the same things as you are. I demo'ed the skis that I am on as an afterthought because the reviews suggested that I would not like them- and I found just the opposite. It is hard to appreciate the subtle differences until you have lots of on snow experience with lots of different skis, and even then it is hard to tell right away what is "better" and what is just "different". Until then, spend the money on lessons and bootfitting- which make, I believe, the biggest difference of all. If you have the chance, find a really good instructor who can dynamically evaluate your stance and boot fit. That might make an enourmous difference for you- it did for me. (and have a belated Chag Pesach Samayach!)
post #12 of 20
Good point about Boots.
post #13 of 20
The above 2 bits of advice are dead on. Don't let others who would recommend a ski that's currently over your head live vicariously through you.
post #14 of 20
Replace your RX4s when you feel that they are letting go of the snow when you are telling them to hang on tight.
Replace your RX4s when you want to ski faster on steeper hills, but feel that they are very unstable at the speed you want to ski at.

If neither of those things is happening, don't replace them.
post #15 of 20
Thread Starter 

Good snow forecast for Mt. Hermon?

Thanks DP, for the Chag Sameach.
Good snow forecast for Mt. Hermon?
We don’t even know what a snow forecast is… : Mt. Hermon (7,200 ft.) does get snow every year but the temperature will rise above freezing level so quickly that I have to drop everything I am doing at a time, school, work (the kids loves it!) and run for it. I will try attach a picture. I used to ski in my motorcycle suit (I guess writing here about my ski suit is ok since IT IS a gear discussion, isn’t it? ). When skiing here - it was enough. This year I moved to using SPYDER, boy are they expensive here!
Any way, since you guys helped me as a support grope in my efforts to convince myself that I used my money wisely , I’ll stay with my RX4 and my NORDICA easy move 10 boots for now, until I grow up to be a skier.
Thanks.
BTW, I can't find a way to attach a picture here, I'll have to read and/or aske about that.
Thanks again.
post #16 of 20
Thread Starter 

Thanks Ghost, I’ll do that :-)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost
Replace your RX4s when you feel that they are letting go of the snow when you are telling them to hang on tight.
Replace your RX4s when you want to ski faster on steeper hills, but feel that they are very unstable at the speed you want to ski at.

If neither of those things is happening, don't replace them.
BTW, I was in your home site, Blue Mountain, Last January. Just for the weekend. Landing (from Israel on Friday morning and going back on Saturday night) It was nice.
It was my first ski for this year. I enjoyed my new skis & boots so much that I skied for two day with my boots on “walk” position. :
To show you what a great skier I am…
post #17 of 20
Here's a web site that can help. Check out Ski Canada's annual Ski Test reports at http://www.skicanadamag.com/Gear/home.html Ski Canada has been testing skis for 25 years and is the only ski test in North America to mask the skis to remove colour and cosmetics as a bias.

The Fischer RX4 was reviewed under the Sport skis category in the December 2005 issue. It did OK but definitely not a ski for anyone beyond intermediate.

Hope this help, Skimag

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eyal_Shahar
Hi,
Reading ski reviews by “SkiPress magazine”, “Ski-Review” and “Real skiers” left me confused. Their opinion on the same ski (Fischer RX4 in my case) varies from “Low level cruiser; best rented” (Real skiers) to “It’s stable, versatile, forgiving, fast…” (SkiPress magazine, Fall 2005, Vol 5, No 1).
Is there a problem with my reading or is it due to the amount of “sponsorship” they get from the companies? I can’t DEMO them all, so I have to get SOME info from “professional” reviews, don’t I?
BTW, speaking of DEMO, is it a common option in North America only? It seems to me that in Europe you can rent a ski, and then, should you decide to buy it; the rental cost will be taken off the ski price. None of the skiers I spoke with about Europe knew about an option of taking a ski for a few hours. Does anyone here can comment on that? I would love to test drive both RX6 and RX8, but Europe is 3-4 hours away and the U.S. - 12 hours... :
post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond
...
If you read French, Ski Pass Reviews.com are interesting, thick description (after all, they're French), useful numerical scores, tons of skis, and they test some you'll never get reviewed here, like Movement or Line. Like above and Canadian sites, seem more in touch with new school/freestyle/freeski readers than here and Real Skiers.
...
If you read french you may also use the Au Vieux Campeur site. It's a shop, but I've found their reviews usualy rather unbiased and informative. And they review a ton of skis.
post #19 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skimag
Here's a web site that can help. Check out Ski Canada's annual Ski Test reports at http://www.skicanadamag.com/Gear/home.html Ski Canada has been testing skis for 25 years and is the only ski test in North America to mask the skis to remove colour and cosmetics as a bias.

The Fischer RX4 was reviewed under the Sport skis category in the December 2005 issue. It did OK but definitely not a ski for anyone beyond intermediate.

Hope this help, Skimag
Thank.I looked at the nice table they provide and tried to locate MY position in their grading table rather than my skis, and decided to declare myself as an Intermediate/Advance skier. :-)Therefore, I am between the RX4 and the RX6. Now, all I need is a justification for a new RX6 (my RX4 are one season old…). My birthday (50) will be on this coming June, so… :-)
post #20 of 20
As a side note: pay very close attention to what length was tested by Realskiers (150cm) or SkiPresse (170cm). SkiPresse have somewhat of a reputation for testing skis on the long side (of proper?).

That teeny detail would certainly explain the apparent disparity.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion