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Blasphemous ski review

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Why, you ask, is this a blasphemous ski review? Because I am going to tell you how wonderful a 157cm ski rides. :

Consider the Atomic Metron 9. This season’s model.

This review is from a “strong intermediate’s” perspective. A little about me. Prior to last season, I skied, maybe 12 or 15 times in my entire life. I got tired of being a mediocre skier. So I bought a set of K2 Escape 5500s at the end of the 2004 season along with boots. Got a season pass and skied 47 times last season and 30 times this season. I progressed rapidly and outgrew the boots and skies. So I demoed skies and chose the M9.

Also I have no history of skiing on 205s, so the idea of short skis working well is easily accepted by me. The charts say I should be on 160s, so I say OK and I ski and have fun.


The M9 is a great ski. Compared to the K2 ( a good choice for a first ski) I suddenly am faster and can descend steep stuff with greater ease. Powder is no longer a problem. Slush no longer is a factor and ice is handled well. From my perspective this is an excellent ski for the progressing intermediate. Just using the ski makes one a better skier IMO. Another plus is that the M9 is made in Austria. The K2 is made in China. Need I say more? Do they have ski resorts in China?

Now as to the length, it appears that Atomic delivers as promised. For my weight and skill level the chart said I should go with the 157 length. So I did. As far as speed and stability are concerned the limiting factor is my brain, not the skis. I go fast and the skis do fine. Stable and smooth. Float in powder is good for a nonpowder ski. My skill level seems to be the limiting factor in powder, not the skis. .

So there you have it. Perhaps in a few years I might go to 164s, but the idea of skiing something over 170cm seems like a bad idea. I would hate to give up the technical nimbleness of the shorter ski for the sake of more speed. But that is just me.

As a "do it all" ski the Metron line seems to work. Good on the groomers and good off trail.
post #2 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by SNPete
Why, you ask, is this a blasphemous ski review? Because I am going to tell you how wonderful a 157cm ski rides. :

Consider the Atomic Metron 9. This season’s model.
Perhaps you should get the lay of the land before using words like blasphemous. You have wandered into the midst of short ski central, and into the metron hotbed of the world. Your post is about as blasphemous as saying AMEN in a church.

Oh, and welcome to epicski, you'll fit right in.
post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict
Perhaps you should get the lay of the land before using words like blasphemous. You have wandered into the midst of short ski central, and into the metron hotbed of the world. Your post is about as blasphemous as saying AMEN in a church.

Oh, and welcome to epicski, you'll fit right in.
Thanks. I got the impression from some other treads that long is good and short is bad.

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?p=483095

I do appreciate the idea that in some situations long has its place. My son does backcountry and chutes and favors 185s with AT bindings.
post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict
..... Your post is about as blasphemous as saying AMEN in a church.....
.

SNPete, welcome to the wonderful world of Metron ownership.
post #5 of 14
SNPete: Nice post. I like the detail you provided for how the ski worked for you and your description of your skiing progression and ability. I like your thoughts on how you might move up to a longer ski and I think its easy to ski most terrain with the shorter skis now a days. most importantly it sounds like you enjoyed the ski and are having fun in the sport. Keep at it, your right as ability improves there will be lots of skis that will do anything you ask of it.
post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by SNPete
Thanks. I got the impression from some other treads that long is good and short is bad.

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?p=483095

I do appreciate the idea that in some situations long has its place. My son does backcountry and chutes and favors 185s with AT bindings.
NO. There are just a few of us who don't want to throw out the baby with the bath water. Modern short skis are stable at ridiculous speeds. A modern 165-cm slalom type ski is as stable as the old 200 cm skis. That does away with the problem of having your ski do the wango-tango anytime you get it up to speed, but it doesn't negate some of the OTHER advantages of a longer ski and a longer radius ski, but that's another thread.

Nice review. Most would agree that the metron should be skied shorter than other skis.
post #7 of 14
Good post , your perspective is one that doesn't often show up around here. And great choice on skis , the M9 is a winner .
post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost
NO. There are just a few of us who don't want to throw out the baby with the bath water. Modern short skis are stable at ridiculous speeds. A modern 165-cm slalom type ski is as stable as the old 200 cm skis. That does away with the problem of having your ski do the wango-tango anytime you get it up to speed, but it doesn't negate some of the OTHER advantages of a longer ski and a longer radius ski, but that's another thread.

Nice review. Most would agree that the metron should be skied shorter than other skis.
Good to know. And I agree with you on when a longer ski is a good thing.

But for me and what my present skiing goals are, the shorter and more nimble ski is what suits me better. Goals: to ski steeper, more technical runs. Get good on ungroomed blacks, do some powder and let my speed increase as a matter of course. When I find that my skis are limiting my speed, then I will go longer.

BTW, yesterday, I was going down, what was for me, some very steep and narrow runs and I REALLY appreciated the short ski with its 11.5 meter radius.
post #9 of 14
IMHO the M9 is the underrated ski of the Metron line.
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by SNPete
Why, you ask, is this a blasphemous ski review? Because I am going to tell you how wonderful a 157cm ski rides. :

Consider the Atomic Metron 9. This season’s model.
Great. Another Metronoderator in the making... :

I appreciated the review, SNP. Welcome to Epic!
post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
IMHO the M9 is the underrated ski of the Metron line.
Just a quick question re the M-9. Oh by the way I have skied it all season and like the ski. Thanks, Phil, for the promo's. Oh, but the question. Is the M-9 difficult to bend (outside ski) in a turn. I have a hell of a time getting the ski to bend (flex) during the turn. I am on edge and I am applying pressure to the ski (outside) during the turn, but I don't see or feel it flexing. I know that the greatest possibility is that I am not working the ski correctly, or that I just don't appreciate the flex. Just wondering if those of you who have experience with this ski find it easy or more difficult to bend.

Mark
post #12 of 14
There's some adventure skiing to be had in China http://www.business-in-asia.com/skichina.html and Japan (remember the olympics?) and Korea.

I'm glad you're enjoying your entree into skiing. You never mentioned how tall you are or how much you weigh, if you are male or female but that would be helpful to others who might want to make a decision based on you review.

Try short skis, long skis, fat skis, skinny skis and any logical combination. Try them for the topsheets, manufacturer, or whatever floats your boat... but realize it's not always the ski, but the skier.
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bklyntrayc

I'm glad you're enjoying your entree into skiing. You never mentioned how tall you are or how much you weigh, if you are male or female but that would be helpful to others who might want to make a decision based on you review.
Sinced you asked: Male. Height: 5-7", weight 160lbs.

IMO, if you are buying blind, I feel there is a 80% chance you will like the M9s if you are an upper level intermediate. Go for it. I paid $395 US for mine, including bindings 2 weeks ago. If you are wanting the perfect ski then wait till next season, demo stuff, pay full price and be happy. Truth be told, one can't lose paying $395 for a $900 (retail) ski that is well regarded, but...

For the perfect ski, I would be willing to pay full price (if needed) after demoing all that I could. In my case, I did demo an 07 M7 and took a chance on my 06 M9. To say I am happy with my choice is an understatement.
post #14 of 14

See/Feel Ski Flexing...

Quote:
Originally Posted by mkevenson
Oh, but the question. Is the M-9 difficult to bend (outside ski) in a turn. I have a hell of a time getting the ski to bend (flex) during the turn. I am on edge and I am applying pressure to the ski (outside) during the turn, but I don't see or feel it flexing. I know that the greatest possibility is that I am not working the ski correctly, or that I just don't appreciate the flex. Just wondering if those of you who have experience with this ski find it easy or more difficult to bend.
howdy, kidz,


mark, the reason you don't see/notice/feel any 'flexing' during a turn on a shorter (even some of the longer models) is:

1st:

you're to busy paying attention to a multiplicity of other factors (like snow conditions, finishing the turn, getting ready to start the next turn transition, other skiers, how much pressure is on which ski [ideally, 40% uphill], feeling the exhilaration of makin' the next perfect carved turn 'cause we all wanna be like phil) during the apex ('highest' or top most part of the turn) to 'feel' the ski flex.

if you look at ron lemaster's site (http://www.ronlemaster.com/), you can see in great detail the various stages of the ski flexing from the 'extreme' forces (speed, gforces, high edge angles, hardness of snow/ice, type of turn [sl or gs, carved, scarved or skidded], amount of pressure applied by skier, pitch of course, mass of skier [where c of m is can also be considered]). and, please understand what lemaster's is showing it not the averager skier (you dear reader/fellow bear, do not ski like that as difficult as it maybe to hear/read).

so just imagine what is being processed by the skier (un/consciously) as they are skiing. i will watch my skis track periodically as i'm beginning a run (even more when i'm using new or unfamiliar gear, till i 'trust' the gear to perform as i intend). occasionally, if i notice 'something' doesn't 'feel' right, i'll 'observe' myself for a few turns (possibly changing turn shape, radius and/or speed).

i can't ever remember 'feeling' the ski flex (my ski lengths are 158cm-166cm, sl & high end carvers, 6ft 220lbs, level 7/8). what i 'experience' is the edges engaging and 'biting' into the hardpack/ice which causes the skis to 'slingshot'/accelerate into the apex of the turn, then the release of the edges getting ready to make the transition.

realize all this occurs very quickly (short turns...even at medium to long turns, things are happening rapidly) and I’m not aware of all the particulars mentioned above. so the skier never gets to see or feel the ski flexing, instead we experience the results of the ski flexing.

2nd:

with all the technology (materials [composites, fabric, wood, foam, titanium], design [what is it to be used for], sidecut [what size turn]) used in skis today, rarely will you get to see the skis bending/flexing, especially when used by the ‘average‘ skier. if you’re imagining the amount of flex in long straight skis from the past (and thank goodness, it’s long past, but there are still some ‘aficionados’/ludites still hanging on…hey, you people, just wanna let you know the world is not flat & the sun doesn’t revolve around the earth…): to current one’s, you’ll never see that degree of flex.

today’s skis are much more versatile and diverse. with the ability of the average skier to go any where, to any condition (whether by flying from the west to ski real conditions here in the ne, or just by having had the good karma to be living in the rockies near a resort), it’s time to let go of the idea of having only one set of skis. you would never find a golfer w only one club, a tennis player w one racquet, a bachelor/ette w one babe/stud…

anyway…thanx, for listening, boyz & gurlz,

bruce marks


ps...every one who reads this, please fill out your profiles completely!!! AND become an EpicSki $upporter!!
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