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Mondo Sizing and boot fitting

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I like many skiers out there am probably in a boot that is too big for me. I am a pretty consistant US street shoe size 10.5 but over the weekend I did a bicycle fit where they measured my foot in metric (heal against the back stop of the board on each foot). With only a light weight sock on I came up on the metric scale as a 27 metric. So based on that I could probably fit into a 9 or something even lower like an 8.5 US or a mondo size of 27 or smaller. I had read that you take the 2 Mondo numbers and add them together for the US street shoe size- in this case a US 9? It is only after a number of years reading about equipment and these types of forums that I know this now. My boots were too tight in spots (6th toe- right behind the little toe and the big toe area) and had to be punched out when new. I will have to try the shell test one more time- I think I have less than 2 fingers in the shell of my existing size 10 1/2 boots now but not 1 finger for sure.

I am 6 foot, mainly interested in groomed, eastern hard packed and racing, ski about 30 days out of the season, and level 8 or so (anything in the east except the very steapest tree runs) minimal double black diamonds out west.

So based on the fact that I have a narrow heel, and a standard width D street fit out at the toes (not quite duck feet though), what boot models (medium flex not high end racing stiff as can be due to my weight of 170 pounds) seem to be the best for fitting this type of foot?
post #2 of 18
Ask Jeff Bergeron . Try , try and try - this is the best advice...but who made your boots?
post #3 of 18
see a boot fitter.

1 - 2 cm fit is good, and you can make a boot bigger, and softer, but not smaller or stiffer.
post #4 of 18
My opinion (based upon many years as a retail boot fitter)

1 cm = A very close, almost race fit. Doable with a very careful set up and a skilled bootfitter. This is tough to live with for the average skier.

2 cm = A very good way to go for most skiers, but the average person still usually whines that this is "too tight"

3 cm = Normally too big, but in a few select cases (Ie: a fat ankle and instep) with a long arch length, this is not the worst thing. A goodly number of skiers will still complain that their toes are cramped.

4 cm = Two fingers. This is almost always too big, usually waaaay too big. (this is also the size that most folks want to buy)

The sad fact is, that almost every skier wants something at least one size too big. When they are sold the proper size, some will often come back crying about not being able to stand it, ripping their boots off on the hill, and walking down in their socks.

Breaking in a ski boot is a totally foreign concept for a very significant portion of the skiing public.

SJ
post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the replys SierraJim and Mtnlion.

I understand I will need a boot fitter at some point for guidance, but the 3 shops that I would trust are quite a drive (and 2 different directions), and each handles different lines of boots- one handles Tecnica, Rossi, others Atomic, Lange, Fischer (which may be on my list) but not all of them handle all the lines I have been reading about. I have not tried on Nordica boots in many years, but always have heard they are better for a wider heel foot, so far they are not on the list.
post #6 of 18
sorry for threadjacking but i didnt want to start a brand new thread for this:
does anyone know the mm difference between mondo half sizes? going from a 28.0 to a 28.5?
thanks,
Mike
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikey_10
sorry for threadjacking but i didnt want to start a brand new thread for this:
does anyone know the mm difference between mondo half sizes? going from a 28.0 to a 28.5?
thanks,
Mike
Easy..... 0.
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim
My opinion (based upon many years as a retail boot fitter)

1 cm = A very close, almost race fit. Doable with a very careful set up and a skilled bootfitter. This is tough to live with for the average skier.

2 cm = A very good way to go for most skiers, but the average person still usually whines that this is "too tight"

3 cm = Normally too big, but in a few select cases (Ie: a fat ankle and instep) with a long arch length, this is not the worst thing. A goodly number of skiers will still complain that their toes are cramped.

4 cm = Two fingers. This is almost always too big, usually waaaay too big. (this is also the size that most folks want to buy)

The sad fact is, that almost every skier wants something at least one size too big. When they are sold the proper size, some will often come back crying about not being able to stand it, ripping their boots off on the hill, and walking down in their socks.

Breaking in a ski boot is a totally foreign concept for a very significant portion of the skiing public.

SJ
Sorry SJ - I normally agree with most of your posts, but I think your off on this one (maybe it's due to the use of the metric system ).

2.54 cm is one inch. That's a typical recreational fit and for me it's equivalent to the "2 fingers" rule. One finger is a bit over 1 cm for me and that's the fit I have on all of my Flexons. I don't consider that a "race room" fit.

I know you have a lot more experience fitting boots to customers, but I find it hard to believe that anyone would find a 4cm fit equivalent to 2 fingers. To me, 2 fingers was always about 1 inch.
post #9 of 18
4cms = 2 fingers seems like pretty chubby fingers... but then your fingers might be chubby if you ripped at boot liners and messed with heat guns and glue everyday too. I thought those four points were a pretty good assessment of the reality of fitting people into boots (as opposed to people here fitting their own boots.) Point remains it's still the size most people want to buy.
post #10 of 18
The rule of finger...........:..........sideways that is.

Index finger @ first joint = 1.7 cm.
Middle finger @ first joint = 1.9 cm.

So my fingers are chubby, hey I'm kinda chubby (and I'm old too)........

Besides, big hands usually means a big..........uhhhhh............

SJ
post #11 of 18
Better yet, use a mini mag light.

Small end 1/2". Large end, 3/4"

small end for a closer to race, tight fit.
Large end for a closer to sport recreational fit.

Skip the finger test because everyone has different size fingers.

A lot of good boot shops have a piece of wood or dowel cut to the different sizes on each end so they can use the same measure for everyone.

and I agree, most skiers "whine" big time about "too tight"

Today I had 2 people come out with boots so big that I couldn't even buckle the top boot tight enough to close the top. They were already complaining about how tight the boot was and with the buckles as tight as was possible I could slide my fingers (yes multple) between their calf and the back of the boot.

And we wonder why they can't seem to get those skis turning!

DC
post #12 of 18
Check out the Solomon coarse ProModel SC boots. Boot fitter at Alta deep powder House recomended these for my skinny calves, heel, it is a low volume boot, 95 flex, not stiff, not soft. My right foot I measured at 28 cm. he put me in a 26 mondo. fit is very good as is the boots performance. http://www.salomonski.com/us/product....asp?id=784340 and http://www.untracked.com/highlight-175844.html
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by L7
Easy..... 0.
do you mean the shells are the same size for 28.0 and 28.5, & only the liners change?
is that standard for pretty much all boots?
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikey_10
do you mean the shells are the same size for 28.0 and 28.5, & only the liners change?
is that standard for pretty much all boots?
Yes, generally all brands have one shell size for each whole and half size. Most brands generally change shell size at the whole size, but there are some that change at the half size (can't seem to recall which at the moment).
post #15 of 18
Thread Starter 
When doing the finger test, do you start with a completely bare foot, or the foot with the ski sock on it?

I have been wearing and happy with the smartwool Ultimax ski socks which are probably a half of finger added. So what are the recommended starting point, sock you ski in or bare foot?
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by RShea
When doing the finger test, do you start with a completely bare foot, or the foot with the ski sock on it?

I have been wearing and happy with the smartwool Ultimax ski socks which are probably a half of finger added. So what are the recommended starting point, sock you ski in or bare foot?
If I'm remembering the Ultimax correctly I'm surprised you think it would add half a finger to your test measurement. By all means though, go ahead and wear your normal ski socks (no harm there).

However, I do strongly recommend using your footbed when checking the fit. Your footbed will change the "effective" length and width of your foot and should be used when shell fitting. Generally the increased support will shorten the length of your foot as opposed to when you are flat footed.
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler
However, I do strongly recommend using your footbed when checking the fit. Your footbed will change the "effective" length and width of your foot and should be used when shell fitting. Generally the increased support will shorten the length of your foot as opposed to when you are flat footed.
that makes a lot of sense - I am surprised that the shops I have been in have never done this!
post #18 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler
If I'm remembering the Ultimax correctly I'm surprised you think it would add half a finger to your test measurement. By all means though, go ahead and wear your normal ski socks (no harm there).

However, I do strongly recommend using your footbed when checking the fit. Your footbed will change the "effective" length and width of your foot and should be used when shell fitting. Generally the increased support will shorten the length of your foot as opposed to when you are flat footed.
That makes sense, as I have been told that my arch needs support and the foot spreads without it. My footbed pretty much is the exact length of my foot, so I should probebly measure it in metric (the measurement on my foot was without any support...so it may change a small amount from the 27 but the socks were thinner than the ski socks.)
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