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Porcupine Gulch Ski Area Colorado?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
I recently recieved a "Lost Resorts" poster from the Colorado Ski Museum. It lists and gives a brief description of all the little old ski areas that once flourished in Colorado. Wow, there sure where a lot at one time....

There is one interesting one that I had never heard of before. It says: "Porcupine Gulch, Loveland Pass: portable rope tow nicknamed 'Little Sweden Freezer Co.." Years ago i worked at Loveland, and I never heard of this area.

The poster doesn't list the years it operated or exactly where on Loveland Pass it was located. Porcupine Gulch actualy comes out to highway 6, about 2.5 miles west of A-Basin. I ask management friends at A-Basin, if they had ever heard of this area. None of the "old-timers at Loveland or A-Basin knows anything about this "ski area."

I'd be interested to hear if anyone has some information on this old area. Photos would be GREAT!

Cheers,
Hacksaw
post #2 of 21
Does Colorado have a version of NELSAP?

Edit: Yes it does (Colorado Ski History), although it's far less extensive.

[ May 21, 2003, 03:12 AM: Message edited by: jamesdeluxe ]
post #3 of 21
Quote:
Originally posted by jamesdeluxe:
Does Colorado have a version of NELSAP?

Edit: Yes it does (Colorado Ski History), although it's far less extensive.
We're working on adding more stuff weekly, but it can be a slow process! Many of these lost resorts are very obscure...If you can't find the resort on my site try the colorado skier newsletters.

[ May 21, 2003, 07:46 AM: Message edited by: coskibum ]
post #4 of 21
bump
post #5 of 21
I have a friend who began teaching in Colorado in 1962. He knows every rock, nook, and cranny in the Indian Peaks area so he will be a good one to ask about the Loveland/A-Basin area. He is out of town and will be back mid month. I'll see if he knows anything.
post #6 of 21
Thread Starter 
Rusty, Thanks! I'll look forward to hearing if your friend has any information.
Cheers,
Hacksaw [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]

[ May 26, 2003, 09:28 AM: Message edited by: Hacksaw ]
post #7 of 21
It may an early reference to the A-Basin ski area.
post #8 of 21
Thread Starter 
A friend at A-Basin is the general manager. He's never heard (or seen in their files) anything about a "Porcupine Gulch" ski area. So, I don't think it has anything to do with A-Basin.
Cheers,
Hacksaw :
post #9 of 21
Thread Starter 
Rusty Guy, Have you had a chance to ask your friend about this?
Cheers,
Hacksaw [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #10 of 21
you could also contact the colorado ski museum, they have files on this area (a good part of the lost resorts poster was made using their historical data).

http://www.skimuseum.net/contact.html
post #11 of 21
Thread Starter 
Brad,
Thanks!
Cheers,
Hacksaw
post #12 of 21
I tried to call him and he is out of town. He should be back soon.
post #13 of 21
Thread Starter 
Rusty, any word from your pal?

I emailed the Colorado Ski Musume and they have not answered back. I'm getting the feeling that they won't.
Cheers,
Hacksaw
post #14 of 21
I spoke to Skip Kitely who has been teaching around here for 41 years and he was no help. He THOUGHT he had heard the name and that it might have been a hill somewhere near Dillon. He said he really wasn't sure.
post #15 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thanks Rusty.
I'll send the CSM a letter and see if they respond.
Cheers,
Hacksaw
post #16 of 21
This is all I could find:

Porcupine Gulch is a 1,570-acre parcel that encompasses the upper reaches of the Porcupine
Creek drainage, just west of Loveland Pass. Elevations range from 9,700 to 12,752 feet. The
emphasis is to be "botanical," because this area is in excellent ecological condition and provides
excellent representation for some of the high-elevation ecosystem types. There are no formal
roads or tails there, and livestock grazing has not occurred for some time. http://216.239.39.100/search?q=cache:mJzmbR8JoAsJ:www.fs.fed.us/r2/whiteriver/rfp/Information_Kit/Summit_county.pdf+%22Porcupine+Gulch%22+and+ski&hl =en&ie=UTF-8

SUMMIT COUNTY - Arapahoe Basin, Colorado's second-highest ski area, gained approval from the U.S. Forest Service to join the ranks of other resorts that use machine-made snow. The Forest Service is officially releasing its decision today. Along with facility upgrades, a tubing hill, a terrain park, some bike trails and new pedestrian access plans, the agency approved a two-phased snowmaking system that initially will help the resort open earlier and, in a few years, could allow it to stay open at least through the Fourth of July consistently.
The resort - which is postponing its opening day from today until it has a few snowstorms - is now allowed to construct two points of diversion from the north fork of the Snake River and build snowmaking pipelines. Next summer, the ski company can begin taking 90 acre feet of water from one diversion point, according to Michael Liu, special projects coordinator for the Forest Service. That amount, Liu said, is enough to cover core terrain and ensure a consistent opening date for the ski area. Then, in a second, more capital-intensive phase of construction, A-Basin will be allowed to divert 279 acre feet of water from a downstream point, near Porcupine Gulch, through a 2 1/2 mile pipe. That access is contingent upon the ski area mitigating downstream water quality effects - either by cleaning up abandoned mine sites on the upper Snake River or by augmenting water from Roberts Tunnel. The ski company will not be allowed to withdraw more than 25 percent of the streamflow and will be limited to 1 cubic feet per second of water in October for the health of trout populations. Proposed bike trails and hiking trails above timberline were denied because of potential impacts on summer wildlife. http://hpccsun.unl.edu/nebraska/stup...artsnomak.html

A few more details from the overall plan. No more than 15 people in a group will be allowed in the wilderness areas (we have 2 in Summit County, Eagles Nest & Ptarmigan), and 25 total in a combination of people & pack/saddle animals. They outlined 3 areas of special interest for protection. Porcupine Gulch, because of its excellent ecolgical condition, botanical resources and overall high-elevation ecosystem types, is one. It's west of Loveland Pass, 1570 acres. http://www.eileneatkinson.com/

[img] o39105f8.125.png [/img]
post #17 of 21
I can look up the file in August when I return to Denver at the museum. Until then either re-email them or sit tight!

-Brad
coloradoskihistory.com
post #18 of 21
Thread Starter 
Brad, I'll sit tight and wait for you to reply here.
Cheers,
Hacksaw
post #19 of 21
ok, sounds good. you might remind me by email in august (brad@coloradoskihistory.com)
post #20 of 21
Thread Starter 
Brad,
Friendly reminder about this. Have you had a chance to check this out? I have not received any answers from the Colo Ski Muesume. Thanks. [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
Cheers,
Hacksaw

[ August 24, 2003, 10:23 AM: Message edited by: Hacksaw ]
post #21 of 21
sorry for the delay...i didn't find anything at the CSM files, i'll keep looking though. It was not a major operation so info is hard to find
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