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Skating downhill

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
This is a version of skating downhill. It is far different than the exercise in the PSIA video.

Firstly, the stride must be athletic, coming from a bent leg (a 90 degree bend is too far). The weight transfer to the glide ski must be complete. The outside edge of the glide ski must be engaged, and the rolling of that ski onto it's inside edge must be complete prior to the next stride.

In fact, the stride must be delayed so that a turn happens. The turn should be at least 1/2 of the way to complete (1/2 way between down the fall-line and across the fall-line). At that point the leg will be flexed, and you can push yourself onto the outside edge of the new glide ski. The stride ski does not touch the snow while the glide ski is engaged.

If you try to go fast, there is considerable movement of the CM downhill to change edges.

It is very dynamic. Careful of the knees.

Comments? Why would you use this drill?
post #2 of 14
I did that in whistler although he was a bit less demanding re how far the turn was to go.... any turning was Ok .....

he let us use pretty flat terrain too...

was fun.... but a prissy girl in the class thought exercises were "boring" and complained.... it was HER that could not edge and so started the whole damn thing!
post #3 of 14
Love that one to get the victims .. er .. clients to really feel their edges and turning the ski with pure pressure as well as getting many into their first agressive comittment to the fall line.

I had a prime piece of "real estate" picked out for this drill that was pretty flat and got a bit steeper so they were lulled into the last phase. I would start them out with just a few "skates" and then take them into a longer and steeper progression .... a few would usually cop out in the end .. but for many, it was a breakthrough moment.
post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki
Love that one to get the victims .. er .. clients to really feel their edges and turning the ski with pure pressure as well as getting many into their first agressive comittment to the fall line.

I had a prime piece of "real estate" picked out for this drill that was pretty flat and got a bit steeper so they were lulled into the last phase. I would start them out with just a few "skates" and then take them into a longer and steeper progression .... a few would usually cop out in the end .. but for many, it was a breakthrough moment.
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki
Love that one to get the victims .. er .. clients to really feel their edges and turning the ski with pure pressure as well as getting many into their first agressive comittment to the fall line.

I had a prime piece of "real estate" picked out for this drill that was pretty flat and got a bit steeper so they were lulled into the last phase. I would start them out with just a few "skates" and then take them into a longer and steeper progression .... a few would usually cop out in the end .. but for many, it was a breakthrough moment.

a FEW cop out??
miss prissy tried maybe one stroke of a skate...(thats what happens when you work for a TV company you think life is like that...)
a few others tried a few skates... but it was "hard work"
left myself and one other still skating/turning while the rest straightlined and then complained of being "bored"...
post #6 of 14
I'm interested in the landing on the outside edge piece. All of the variations I've done have involved landing the skate step on the inside edge. Taking such skating steps into short radius turns worked well for me this year.
post #7 of 14
therusty I was always taught OUTSIDE edge feels the snow THEN you start to pressure it... and it rollls and glides.... sort of like the start of Fastmans ILE.... in that you (I) use the same sensory cues on pressuring the ski...
post #8 of 14
Landing on the outside edge also requires a more dynamic and commited movement of the core in the direction of the skating stride, along wiht the edging skills. I use these frequently in classes. Later, RicB.
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty
I'm interested in the landing on the outside edge piece. All of the variations I've done have involved landing the skate step on the inside edge. Taking such skating steps into short radius turns worked well for me this year.
I've been always taught to land on the outside edge and then during the glide roll on the inside one.
Looking at people who land on the inside edge, I have a feeling that it limits their dynamic range of movements (e.g. the stride is shorter) in comparison to those who land on the outside edge.
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE
This is a version of skating downhill. It is far different than the exercise in the PSIA video.

Firstly, the stride must be athletic, coming from a bent leg (a 90 degree bend is too far). The weight transfer to the glide ski must be complete. The outside edge of the glide ski must be engaged, and the rolling of that ski onto it's inside edge must be complete prior to the next stride.

In fact, the stride must be delayed so that a turn happens. The turn should be at least 1/2 of the way to complete (1/2 way between down the fall-line and across the fall-line). At that point the leg will be flexed, and you can push yourself onto the outside edge of the new glide ski. The stride ski does not touch the snow while the glide ski is engaged.

If you try to go fast, there is considerable movement of the CM downhill to change edges.

It is very dynamic. Careful of the knees.

Comments? Why would you use this drill?
I call it skating using all 4 edges, this is a great drill/ task that helps me to feel where and when the engagement of the edge occurs especially when rolling from outside to inside edge. that is the movement in skiing the commitment to release old uphill edge to the downhill edge on the cross over. If you do it right it feels like you are locked on to the slope. Best as others have said to start out on really gentle terrain then ramp it up after one starts to get the feeling of the move and the results of clean edge engagement.
post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 
At what stage in a skiers development would you consider using the drill?
post #12 of 14
I'll suggest a varation I call scribing that I like to use to develope better feel for using the feet to control the skis edges and learning to better manage the relationship between what the inside and outside feet/skis are doing. (Start this on flatter terrain in the falline).

Goal is to keep both skis on the snow at all times and learn to roll the feet independantly to use the sidecut of each ski to have the skis first diverge, and then converge, then match thru each 'skate'. At the start of a skate begin by edging the leading foot/ski more on to it's outside edge so it diverges. Then roll it over and manage the converging of the skis until the following foot/ski is rolled over and the skis are momentatilly matched on cooresponding edges. Then repeat the process in the opposite direction. Work from a narrower stance to keep the divergance within reason to avoid stressing the knees.
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE
At what stage in a skiers development would you consider using the drill?
If the guest is comfortable standing and gliding on skis in a decently balanced stance. Might as well try to introduce this skating because one of my goals is to get people experiencing early edge engagement. One other thing about this is that at many areas to get from point A to point B sometimes there are flat areas, they will either walk/shuffle or skate, well might as well get them skating this way as to work in the movement patterns ( rolling ankles into the direction of new turn) early on in their development as skiers. The more a skier feels in control of what they are doing with the skiis the more comfortable they will be trying different things i.e. speed,slope, surface conditions, size and shape of turns.
post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 
PSIA guide suggests level 5.

Arc, that exercise has a name up here... it's called "wobbly knees".
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