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MA steep spring crud - Page 2

post #31 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson
Again, dchan, your skiing ain't bad. it just could use some polishing. This looks like tough sledding. If it's what you encounter in your exams, you need to spend a bit more time skiing these conditions routinely. And I realize the conditions the other guy was skiing in were far less difficult than what's in your video, but I suspect he'd look smoother and more confident in those conditions too. It's all a bunch of little nuances you're going to be adding to your skiing as you progress.
Thanks KB. Yes I need much polishing, That's why I keep pushing my skiing and posting video..

Actually this was one of our better days for snow as far as the conditions we are expected to ski in the exam.. Day one was the same snow, some deeper some more cutup, Very windy and close to zero vis. We didn't do any video day one because the Vis and weather was so bad. Unfortunatly we don't get conditions like this all the time to practice on but if the opportunity arises, You can bet I'll be out there practicing. (provided I'm not "working")

The reference video guy is one of the coaches from ESA in 2004, Snowbird.. Weems...

Like I said earlier, someone I would aspire to ski like.

I'll keep at it!
post #32 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan

The reference video guy is one of the coaches from ESA in 2004, Snowbird.. Weems...

Like I said earlier, someone I would aspire to ski like.

I'll keep at it!
Is that why no one agrees excessive tip lead isn't visible in the last 3rd of the video? The first 2 thirds of the video don't show it but when he cranks up the pace a little in the last third the tip lead is quite pronounced. Like I said maybe that much is OK but then tdk6's is OK too.
post #33 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashski
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan
The reference video guy is one of the coaches from ESA in 2004, Snowbird.. Weems...

Like I said earlier, someone I would aspire to ski like.

I'll keep at it!=
Is that why no one agrees excessive tip lead isn't visible in the last 3rd of the video? The first 2 thirds of the video don't show it but when he cranks up the pace a little in the last third the tip lead is quite pronounced. Like I said maybe that much is OK but then tdk6's is OK too.
Nah, I don't think so. Maybe give it some time for more people to weigh in

Like you said, he ramps it up a bit in the last segment, gets some deeper angles going, brings the skis across the hill more, and is on a steeper pitch.
post #34 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan
The reference video guy is one of the coaches from ESA in 2004, Snowbird.. Weems...
I thought I recognized that skiing .

Your stance is narrower and your skiing is smoother in the other MA video you just put up. I know the conditions were very different, but it looks like you do vary your stance width for the conditions, but it's opposite to how I do it - I go wider on groomers and narrower in crud, powder, and moguls.
post #35 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler
I thought I recognized that skiing .

Your stance is narrower and your skiing is smoother in the other MA video you just put up. I know the conditions were very different, but it looks like you do vary your stance width for the conditions, but it's opposite to how I do it - I go wider on groomers and narrower in crud, powder, and moguls.
Which other MA Video? The "more spring crud" video?
post #36 of 46
I see the same three things in this video as I have seen in the videos you posted a few months ago.

The outside ski is released after the inside ski resulting in an overly wide stance through the transition and A-frame entry into the next turn.

Extension of the inside leg is the primary means of transition into the next turn, resulting in a movement of the CM up and over the outside ski with a fall into the middle of the next turn. Watch the relationship of your inside and outside legs through the last 90 degrees of the turn. The inside leg lengthens to meet the length of the outside leg. The outside leg should be shortening to meet the length of the inside leg.

A skidded rotary entry to start the first 15-20 degrees of turn entry which sets up a skidded drift through out the rest of the turn.

If I were asked to suggest something to work on, I would suggest working on relaxing the outside leg to initiate the turn transition and drive the rest of the turn with an active tipping of the inside foot.
post #37 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan
Which other MA Video? The "more spring crud" video?
Sorry about that - the shmedium carving turns video. I forgot how many videos you've put up here .
post #38 of 46
In conditions such as these, I like to keep the tips more in the fall line and use a closer stance. I see you moving farther across the hill rather than attacking the hill. I don't think comparing yours with the other video is comparison, the conditions looked much tougher in your video.

There was heated conversation in a thread on Spring skiing conditions that really had some good points.(and some useless ones as well) I also think you'd have done better on longer, wider skis.

Considering how badly you broke your leg dchan, I think you're doing awesome.
post #39 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars
Considering how badly you broke your leg dchan, I think you're doing awesome.
Thanks Lars.
post #40 of 46

European opinion....

Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan
In all the skiing I've done in the past 3 years with all the examiners and trainers, while working in crud, bumps, groomers, even while watching video, (except here) none of the people I've skied with have ever told me the stance is too wide. Some have said I could "get away" with a narrower stance and that I should play with different widths to see how they feel but none have really suggested I need to make it narrower. If I could do a hang (can't now due to a shoulder injury) I think probably closer to 8".

By the way, the host of insructors that have watched and "evaluated" my skiing live include Shaunzy, Bonnie Wetmore, Rob Sogard, Scott Mathers, Mark Quaintaince, Ted Pitcher, Kemp Doudy, "El" , Steve Evenson, Doug Pierini, Mike Iman, and several others.

Maybe they are just not mentioning it but I do keep playing with different feelings and stance widths to find what works best for me.
Dont know any of those examiners but if I was out skiing with you in terrain like this I would shurely have you try a more narrow stance. But its not only the stance width that matters. If you cannot unweight or pump and work more actively with your leggs bringing your skis together wount help you much at all.

The reason I commented on the stance width and the tip lead was that by widening your stance you automatically increse your inside ski tip lead when you angulate. If this is a problem or not I will not get into, just simple physics. While skiing on a hard groomed slope you can pressure your skis individually and get just about the exact rebound you are looking for but in crudd or soft snow pressure is varying a lot and that shows up in balance issues in your skiing. Also the friction your boot and leg gets while sunk into the snow or surfacing is affecting your skiing. When you close your stance you atutomatically limit these varying forses to affect your balance. At the end of second run frames 00:42/43 you can see how you loose balance. This is offcourse at the end of the run and you are exchausted and you cannot wait for it all to end but only shows how a small bump can throw your whole body off balance.

BTW, your skiing resembles Gregs a lot. Both of you ski the same way on groomers and on crudd/soft snow.
post #41 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6
The reason I commented on the stance width and the tip lead was that by widening your stance you automatically increse your inside ski tip lead when you angulate.
Don't you mean counter?
post #42 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE
Don't you mean counter?
If you have a wide stance and you lean yourselfe in one direction your outside ski leg will stay streched but your inside leg knee will be bent because the distance to the ground becomes shorter. When your inside knee is bent your inside foot is pushed forwards and tip lead is created. The more you lean the bigger the tip lead untill your knee is bent over 90deg.
post #43 of 46
I didn't read the whole thread, and I'm no kind of instructor...

....but dude....relax a little. Loosen up those knees, relax your shoulders and back.
post #44 of 46

Get after it

I read most of the advice people have been giving you, and all of it is pretty good. However, everyone has missed a critical mistake you are making ( no worries though, its extremely common). You seem to be dropping your inside hand as you are completing your turn. This draws you into the back seat. The fix? First, look at least three turns ahead, this keeps your head up. Second, when you are completing your turn exaggerate that hand position and literally hold it up by your face. It will naturally go to a more comfortable position. Third, be quick with your pole plants. I ski in Oregon, in a lot of crappy snow. I have found that a stable, nearly motionless upper body is essential to skiing crud effectively. The lower body stuff is important too, but upper body is most important because if your upper body is in control then your legs only need to do half the work because you will already be balanced. Also, your stance is fine, maybe a touch wide. Don't worry about tip lead and all that technical stuff, just keep both feet planted to the ground and you'll be fine. And finally, if you're on a pair of 165 crossmax's do yourself a huge favor and get a pair of boards with some width. I recommend the Dynastar legend 8000, k2 apache recon or outlaw, and maybe even the Rossi B3( but Rossi tends to suck).
post #45 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan
In all the skiing I've done in the past 3 years with all the examiners and trainers, while working in crud, bumps, groomers, even while watching video, (except here) none of the people I've skied with have ever told me the stance is too wide. Some have said I could "get away" with a narrower stance and that I should play with different widths to see how they feel but none have really suggested I need to make it narrower. If I could do a hang (can't now due to a shoulder injury) I think probably closer to 8".

By the way, the host of insructors that have watched and "evaluated" my skiing live include Shaunzy, Bonnie Wetmore, Rob Sogard, Scott Mathers, Mark Quaintaince, Ted Pitcher, Kemp Doudy, "El" , Steve Evenson, Doug Pierini, Mike Iman, and several others.

Maybe they are just not mentioning it but I do keep playing with different feelings and stance widths to find what works best for me.
Dchan...when I took the Gordy Peifer course this winter, all of the coaches encouraged a WIDE stance in variable conditions. Thise guys know just a little about skiing in crud and steeps.

You are in the back seat in the transition phase. Try lowering your hands more than usual in the crud...works for me.

Hard to see terrain details, but you might be turning/traversing too much. In the crud, longer radius turns help...speed control can be done w/a schmear at the end. Probably not PSIA approved, but effective, especially on the steep.

Seems to be a lack of extension/fexion...I find that being more dynamic in the crud helps. Also, your upper body is not facing downhill much. Again, in the crud, I find that an exaggeration of the body position helps turn initiation. It may be passe, but the old adage of "belly button to the fall line" applies in variable conditions. Maybe some more equal weight on the skis too.
post #46 of 46

Disclaimer on Movement Analysis

In reference to the above....

I hold no certification of any type as it relates to skiing or the instruction of the same. I have never taught skiing nor received any training in teaching skiing or its mechanics. There is arguably no reason to put any stock in my comments.

Also, some people find me obnoxious and I've been accused of making inappropriate remarks at just the right time. I've also passed gas in the crowded tram at Snowbird and leered disapprovingly at someone else.

I hate the Red Sox.
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