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Scotch - your favorites - Page 4

post #91 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
Viking Kaj Wrote: "Also for the record, Bushmills is not Scotch but Irish and therefore a whiskey. Most Irish whiskey is blended but Bushmills does a single malt. I understand that Bushmills is owned by protestants, so you may want to be careful ordering one in Ireland."

Bushmills is drank widely in Ireland and is the prefered whiskey in the pubs, I've drank plenty of it in the pubs and in the home of one of my wifes' relatives. try Blackbush 10,12 or 16. this is excellent whiskey

Personally, give a Blantons or Knob Creek bourbon with one cube and I'm a happy camper.
Black Bush is a most excellent whiskey, and the Irish thought to put it in a square boddle so the dahmed thing wont rrroll off the table......
post #92 of 110
I bough my Dad a bottle of 25 yr old MacAllan's for Christmas,and it brought a tear to his eye.after tasting it,I can see why.For everyday drinking you can't go wrong with LaGavulin or Oban.Do they have snow in Scotland this year?
post #93 of 110
CanadaSteep,the best Scotch selection that I've heard of in Ottawa is at the Manx Pub.It's on Elgin near Gladstone.Lots of folks in there who look like they know there way around a bottle of single Malt.
post #94 of 110
[quote=viking kaj;593810]By the way, the Scots usually drink their whisky thinned with only cold well water to taste (no ice). Usually your dram (a measure) comes with a small earthenware pitcher of water in Scotland so you can do this your self. Most people over there thin by a third or so.

Ah VK, close but no cigar On Hogmanay (tr. New Year's eve) when every scotman around the world feels homesick I must correct this.. The whisky is drunk neat, the water is drunk on the side.

Favorites? Glenmorangie and Macallans (If you ever get the chance sample the 35 year old )

Oh, and a guid new year to ain and a' ,,,,,
post #95 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScotsSkier View Post
Ah VK, close but no cigar On Hogmanay (tr. New Year's eve) when every scotman around the world feels homesick I must correct this.. The whisky is drunk neat, the water is drunk on the side.

Favorites? Glenmorangie and Macallans (If you ever get the chance sample the 35 year old )

Oh, and a guid new year to ain and a' ,,,,,

ScotSkier,

Nae Borra, Geesa break, ye would na be Glaswegian, would ye?

Apparently water in the whisky is a matter of taste, or if you live along the Firth of Forth a matter of manliness, which Glaswegians do not take lightly. It appears that this is a matter of some concern, even for Scots, but most of the whisky tastings that I have been to over there involve spring water in the whiskey as further evidenced by the conversation with Ian Millar, Chief Ambassador for Glenfiddich below.

In any event, I hope you will agree that no ice and no gingerale should come anywhere near an honest dram.

Hoping your first footer was na a lass,

Kaj


Quote:

Whisky, water & the great debate

I can not even begin to count the number of times that I have ended up arguing late into the night over the merits of putting a little water into a glass of Scotland?s single greatest contribution to the World - & lets we honest here as anyone who has endured the climate north of the boarder for any period of time can testify to, its no wonder they invented whisky. Whether your preference is for the lighter hues of the Speyside varieties or like your humble correspondent you opt for the more dusky charms of the islands distilleries you can always find someone that will ruin decent booze by drinking it neat.
Ross Anderson, writing in The Times attempted to finally lay the great whisky fallacy to rest ?

Where I come from in Glasgow, the only thing you put in your whiskey is more whisky. Anyone who so much as entertains the notion of water risks being condemned as, at best, a wimp or, at worst, that most contemptible of creatures, a Big Southern Jessie

As whisky drinking chaps know, you never ever drink whisky neat ? you might as well put coca-cola in it. As for ice, if you want something really cold, go at get yourself a bucket of penguin sh1t. Decent whisky, of which I consume considerably more the health fascists at the British Medical Association recommends is good for me, should always be taken with a little water, as Anderson goes on to discover under the tutelage of Ian Millar, Chief Brand Ambassador for Glenfiddich.
Millar categorically states & who are we to argue ?
The water releases the flavour compounds held within the spirit, & it takes time. Idealy you should buy your dram, add the water, then leave it on the bar for 20-30 minutes before drinking it. Of course, that?s hardly going to work in the pub. But you can do it at home.

Posted by Mr Free Market at March 23, 2006 10:55 AM | TrackBack
post #96 of 110
I don't drink whiskey or scotch; I put a tiny dram in my mouth and it somehow gets absorbed. I guess the saliva to scotch ratio is about a third.
post #97 of 110
I think that the stronger flavours can overpower the more subtle flavours if you drink it neat and too quickly, but if you imbide slowly enough, you get it all.
BTW, I got a bottle of 16-yr-old Lagavulin for Christmass. It IS very good. I'm about to pour myself a few drams. O.K. more than a few.
post #98 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by viking kaj View Post
ScotSkier,

Nae Borra, Geesa break, ye would na be Glaswegian, would ye?

Apparently water in the whisky is a matter of taste, or if you live along the Firth of Forth a matter of manliness, which Glaswegians do not take lightly. It appears that this is a matter of some concern, even for Scots, but most of the whisky tastings that I have been to over there involve spring water in the whiskey as further evidenced by the conversation with Ian Millar, Chief Ambassador for Glenfiddich below.

In any event, I hope you will agree that no ice and no gingerale should come anywhere near an honest dram.

Hoping your first footer was na a lass,

Kaj
Haw, Jeez!!! You've sussed me only Glaswegian by association having spent 30 years in the West of Scotland. More importantly however a Highlander by birth and lived on Speyside during my youth when I practised drinking. Glenfiddich is only really for export after all....

However we are in total agreement
Quote:
In any event, I hope you will agree that no ice and no gingerale should come anywhere near an honest dram.
which means we do not need to embargo supplies

Oh, and i will ignore the Firth of Forth reference : since that is Embra, no' Glesca. (for the uninitiatied The Edinburgh/Glasgow divide is akin to Red Sox/Yankees rivalry. Embra of course is where they coined the phrase "Come in, come in, you'll have had your tea!"

Awrabest for 2007 !!
post #99 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScotsSkier View Post

Oh, and i will ignore the Firth of Forth reference : since that is Embra, no' Glesca. (for the uninitiatied The Edinburgh/Glasgow divide is akin to Red Sox/Yankees rivalry. Embra of course is where they coined the phrase "Come in, come in, you'll have had your tea!"

Awrabest for 2007 !!
Ohmygawd, I meant Firth of Clyde :. Believe me I've been there and know better. We used to have a plant in Inchinnan, next to Paisley. My brain must still be addled from New Year's...

Good thing I didn't make that mistake at the Horseshoe Bar or I'd be in serious trouble.

So are you Celtic or Rangers?
post #100 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by viking kaj View Post
Ohmygawd, I meant Firth of Clyde :. Believe me I've been there and know better. We used to have a plant in Inchinnan, next to Paisley. My brain must still be addled from New Year's...

Good thing I didn't make that mistake at the Horseshoe Bar or I'd be in serious trouble.

So are you Celtic or Rangers?
Too much good scotch I hope.....!! The Horseshoe bar, I wish i could remember the good nights spent there, unfortunately they were usually a blur :

Definitely a Rangers man although given the season they have been having....just like being a Red Sox fan!
post #101 of 110
The manx is def. a great pub, and I know it well.
But the Scotch drinking company I keep would much rather just pick up a bottle and do it in

^^Illogical to spend $$$ on a serving when splitting a bottle will do you MUCH better.

IF in NYC, check out Bar & Books
or google it.
post #102 of 110
Thread Starter 
IN NYC you should go to DBA on First Avenue between 1st and 2nd street or the Blind Tiger on ?Hudson? at West Tenth Street. Both are great bars with good beer and single malt selections. DBA also has grreat Tequila's as well. Was just there last week for two pints, but skipped the single malts as I had a bottle of Caol Ila at my in-laws.

The Ledaig 20 year, Caol Ila and the Lagavullin are three of my favorites.


DBA also has hand draughts - one of the few places in the states I have found them.
post #103 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by viking kaj View Post
Also for the record, Bushmills is not Scotch but Irish and therefore a whiskey. Most Irish whiskey is blended but Bushmills does a single malt. I understand that Bushmills is owned by protestants, so you may want to be careful ordering one in Ireland.
Bushmills is a town in Co. Antrim, Northern Ireland, UK. The distillery is named for the town. The town is a Protestant town between two Catholic towns. But, this doesn't mean what it used to.

Most Irishmen/Britons (depending on your persuasion) in Northern Ireland drink Bushmills because it was what was commonly available during earlier times. In the Republic, Jameson's and Paddy are the most popular. Now it's easy to get whiskey from the Republic in the North, and vice versa. But, old habits die hard.

I've had a Bush at a pub on the Falls Road in Belfast--nothing happened. I've had a Jameson's in Armagh when everyone was toasting King Billy on 12 July--nothing happened, even while wearing a T-shirt that says "Tá gráin agam ar Thatcher fós" ("I still hate Thatcher", not that anyone in Armagh has any Irish ). And in the Republic, I've had both--nothing happened.

I think those kind of distinctions matter more to (Irish-)Americans. If they did matter in Ireland, they certianly don't anymore.

[/thread hijack]

Quote:
Irish Whisky: Kilbeggan and Paddy, occasionally Tullamore Dew. Since these are blends age is usually not as much of a factor. Kilbeggan is distinctive and lighter in flavor than most other Irish whiskeys, so if you can find a bottle grab it an give it a try.
You've got to try Middleton's "Very Rare".



As for Scotch whisky, I've always been partial to Oban.

Cheers, gents
post #104 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by faber View Post
Bushmills is a town in Co. Antrim, Northern Ireland, UK. The distillery is named for the town. The town is a Protestant town between two Catholic towns. But, this doesn't mean what it used to.

Most Irishmen/Britons (depending on your persuasion) in Northern Ireland drink Bushmills because it was what was commonly available during earlier times. In the Republic, Jameson's and Paddy are the most popular. Now it's easy to get whiskey from the Republic in the North, and vice versa. But, old habits die hard.

I think those kind of distinctions matter more to (Irish-)Americans. If they did matter in Ireland, they certainly don't anymore.
I'm glad to hear that politics are not getting the the way of serious drinking, which I understand is the true national sport of Ireland .

Personally, I'm very fond of Kilbeggan, have you tried this?
post #105 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by viking kaj View Post
I'm glad to hear that politics are not getting the the way of serious drinking, which I understand is the true national sport of Ireland .

Personally, I'm very fond of Kilbeggan, have you tried this?
No, I haven't. I don't get back as much as I used to since moving to American Siberia. It was easier when I was on the coast. And when I do get back, it's a Guinness for me more often than not. But, I'll look for Kilbeggan when I'm next there.

It's always been a bottle of Bush for my lot. Here in Bozo they sell it at the gas station, which is good enough for the house, for the flask....which I need to fill. 5" at Big Sky. Gotta go.

Slán go fóill
post #106 of 110
The Oban, followed by Lagavulin, which beat out The Macallan for the number two spot because it's way funner to say, "Lagavulin."
post #107 of 110
Just found this thread searching for another - Current favorites

Caol Ila 12 and 18 year

Bowmore Darkest, Dusk and 16 year
post #108 of 110
Well we usually have Highland Park or Scapa in our hip flask (both from the Orkneys) and they're rather special. I also like Macallan, Glenlivet, Talisker and Glenmorangie. By the way, it's pronounced GlenmOrangie with emphasis on the O and not GlenmorAngie but you probably already knew that.

Cheers!
post #109 of 110
Hey, anybody have any espperience with Japanese whisky? I remember getting some Nikka single malts over there that were just killer...
post #110 of 110
 Bump for a bit of Scotch Humor
http://videosift.com/video/Ron-White-Scotchguard
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