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is a turn just a turn?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
all this talk of carving versus arcing versus skidding (blah blah) got me to thinking about when I ski each kind of turn ... just for curiosity, please fill in the blanks below with a description of your turn (arc, carve, scarve, skid, etc.):

1) when I am on a hard-packed or packed powder surface, I ski a _______ turn.
2) when I am in deep fresh snow, I ski a ______ turn.
3) when I am in soft moguls, I ski a _____ turn.
4) when I am in hard moguls, I ski a _____ turn.
5) when I am in spring corn snow, I ski a _____ turn.
6) when I am in fresh snow with a wind-packed surface, I ski a ____ turn.

(I know there are many more conditions, please add as many as you can think of)
post #2 of 20
I have no rules. Whatever works. Each turn is different. In today's setting-up fresh wet deep stuff, I'd start with a hop/speisse, then maybe a carve, then get adventurous and try sliding or skidding, then do a jet/launch off a bump....
Every turn is different, unless you are on a flat groomer, pretty much.
post #3 of 20
1) arc
2) carve
3) scarve
4) skid
5) carve
6) 'nother round at the bar.
post #4 of 20
Fresh with a wind crust? Use a bit of slalom technique! Works a treat.
post #5 of 20
You are the best!

Cheers
post #6 of 20
Klkaye,

Quote:
please fill in the blanks below with a description of your turn (arc, carve, scarve, skid, etc.):
Variety is the spice of life. I try to do all types of turns on all types of snow and terrain.

RW
post #7 of 20
I always try to make some kind of arc. I usually try to carve in all conditions that require cutting out an arcing platform to stand on. Those that don't require that (ie rounded gullies in bumps), I don't have to carve to have the same effect (just ride the rut, like in a race course). The exceptions are that when I need to slow down more than my line or radius will allow, I allow the ski to drift some, or I cause it to drift appropriately.

Like motorcycle riding, it's all about traction in the arc.
post #8 of 20
1). round
2). round
3). round
4). round
5). round
6). round

That was easy.

L
post #9 of 20
After doing my best to arc everything with long stiff skis for about 35 years, and sucking at moguls, I've been trying to incorporate pivoting and skidding into my bump skiing for the last two seasons.
post #10 of 20
SL or GS turns in all terrain- only exception would be deep powder where I use more of and extension/retraction type movement but still use SL or GS radius and body position.

I try to get as much out of the ski design as possible- Basically model the turn after the target design parameters of the ski, otherwise you are wasting performance. Kinda like buying a Lamborghini just to ride slowly to the coffee shop .
post #11 of 20
1: Right
2: Left
3: Right
4: Left
5: Right
6: Left

And sometimes when the conditions are really, really good (or really, really bad), I'll throw in two rights in a row just to confuse the onlookers. I make a better right turn than left.
post #12 of 20
Beautiful, Bob
post #13 of 20
what about really heavy wet rainy day stuff. i put my feet a little closer and tried to stay in the middle to keep from falling on my face when the snow stalled me. i seemed to be fighting front of ski pressure and trying to be centered . it seems that you have to keep pressure up front to steer properly, often though i was skidding in the slop and felt unsure about which tactic would work best. any suggestions? it this just how it is in this nasty stuff. ??
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ
what about really heavy wet rainy day stuff. i put my feet a little closer and tried to stay in the middle to keep from falling on my face when the snow stalled me. i seemed to be fighting front of ski pressure and trying to be centered . it seems that you have to keep pressure up front to steer properly, often though i was skidding in the slop and felt unsure about which tactic would work best. any suggestions? it this just how it is in this nasty stuff. ??
I love skiing in the rain because the snow usually is soft and slick. Where I ski, we mostly have really hard snow. The drawback to rainy days is that visibility usually is poor. Oh, yeah, you also tend to get wet.

Anyway, my approach to wet slop is similar to my approach to powder, which is to ride the skis up on edge and not turn off the fall line a lot. The resistance of the snow reduces the need for speed control. My focus is on trying to have the feet follow the tips of the skis and keep both skis weighted. It's when your weighting of the skis changes that you get balance problems from resistant snow.
post #15 of 20
thanks kneale. twice today. are you saying to spend as little time on flat skis as you can and be evenly distruduted on both ski and not use a more weighted lower ski and keep turns moving often and of short raidus. almost like a mogul strategy?
post #16 of 20
garry - I think surf....
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ
thanks kneale. twice today. are you saying to spend as little time on flat skis as you can and be evenly distruduted on both ski and not use a more weighted lower ski and keep turns moving often and of short raidus. almost like a mogul strategy?

I think edged skis cut through stuff better. The tips already are engaged and less likely to be fluttering around in the slop. More equal weighting keeps the skis working more the same and there's less liklihood of them going their separate ways. I also think keeping the skis weighted (not unweighting at the transition between turns) reduces the chance the grip of snow on the skis will disturb your balance. I like to be feeling the bottoms of my feet all the time in these conditions. You also want to be patient. Not make sudden edge changes, but rather start reducing edging from one turn earlier and gradually increase edging in the new turn. Keep everything moving at the same pace all the time.
post #18 of 20
The only time I carve (RR tracks) is when I consciously make the effort to keep the entire ski moving along the same arc. Everything else ranges from scarving to shameless pivoting.
post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomB
The only time I carve (RR tracks) is when I consciously make the effort to keep the entire ski moving along the same arc. Everything else ranges from scarving to shameless pivoting.
I like to carve it up, and that usually works well up to a certain speed and degree of turning force. What I do is maybe shift my weight back just before running smack into those big piles of super super glue.

At some point the slush just has too much give to it. That's when I think water-skiing and basically set my edges and deflect the slush one way as I turn in the other direction. If you not to good at carving this is what i would advise. It's sort of like a snow-plow (not wedged; big tipping angle) turn, but both skis are parallel and both are the "outside ski in the snow plow". The actual outside ski has most of the force.
post #20 of 20
thanks kneale , that makes alot of sense. i was doing fine ,using alot of angulation and cutting nicely , then i as i started to tire in the last parts of the day i got sloppy and lost my rythm.to know the mechanics of the actual technique helps me believe in it and stay with it
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