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B3s - I'm now officially a gaper

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Well, I've been on a quest the past couple seasons trying to find a new everyday ski for Bridger Bowl with a waist somewhere around 80mm. Most of the candidates failed because they weren't good in crud or they were a pain to ski moguls with in flat light conditions. After trying numerous skis I went and bought this year's B3s. SkiTote and Bogner one-piece to are next on my shopping list.
post #2 of 21
I ski B3's, I don't consider myself a gaper. Then again as bad as I ski I'm probably a gaper anyway.

I love my B3's and my Bandit X's, although I'll probably get more of dedicated carver next season for on piste and I'm tempted to throw down a few runs on my old Authier Goldstars and Targa's just to see what I've been missing.
post #3 of 21
I think that are some skis that just plain "work" and as such should be considered benchmarks within their categories. The current B3 and Legend 8000 are two examples of skis with far from the latest look or new kewl technology yet both are hard to beat for a good workmanlike tool. I consider those as slightly different in category but both are winners.

If you are a Gaper, then I guess I am too.............:

SJ
post #4 of 21
Another convert.

Rossi owners are gaining on the Atomic masses here.

Reguardless of what many say, there are some awesome skiers on the B3.

Add one more.
post #5 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Another convert.
More like the return of the prodigal son. I've owned more Rossignols in my life, starting with the Strato 102, than any other brand. I'm glad they decided to put a little (but not too much) kick back in the Bandit line.
post #6 of 21
i hated the B3 and am amazed so many here and in the mags like them. the tip is too soft for my taste as i tend to pressure the tips most of the times.
post #7 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by smileguy1
i hated the B3 and am amazed so many here and in the mags like them. the tip is too soft for my taste as i tend to pressure the tips most of the times.
I also encountered just a bit of this because I'm use to the "old school" technique, but every modern ski I've been on does this when skiid in this way. Now that I'm finally starting to get the hang of the more modern technique (more laterall preasure) I don't have any issues and I won't be going back to the old tipping the ski way of skiing over the advantages I'm now discovering w/modern technique.
post #8 of 21
Why such an anti-Rossignol bias on this site? I'm certianly not an expert skier (as many on this site probably are), although I am aggressive skier and like to ski the balck and double black runs at A-Basin, Crested Butte, Mary Jane etc. When searching the internet for reviews, the magazines tend to rate the Bandit series highly. Yet only Lars and a few others seem to like them here. I certailny found them easy to ski and they seem to allow me to improve my skiing. I find the Volkl's and Atomics too stiff and too difficult for me. I did like the Dynastar 8000 and 4800 and the K2 Apache series. I like skiing bump runs mostly and speed isn't my thing. I don't get too many powder days (more than 12 inches) and the snow in Colorado isn't as heavy as California. I've demoed about 20 different skis the past two years and find the B2 and B3 most to my liking. My brother whom I ski with most often has commented that I look most comfortable and ski the best on the Rossi's. I am filling my quiver this year and will certainly have either the B2 or B3 as my main ski (subject of another thread later).
So why do many on this site dislike the B2 and B3?
post #9 of 21

I Have not tried This Years B-3

However I saw a guy whos a (famous Skier) Riding B-3's This was his hard snow sunny day ski.


Bottom ROW middle (Gordy Peifer) with B-3's
post #10 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by memosteve
I also encountered just a bit of this because I'm use to the "old school" technique, but every modern ski I've been on does this when skiid in this way. Now that I'm finally starting to get the hang of the more modern technique (more laterall preasure) I don't have any issues and I won't be going back to the old tipping the ski way of skiing over the advantages I'm now discovering w/modern technique.
i have found many skis that respond to more forward pressure like the monster 88, outlaw, mantra. what are the advantages of more modern technique?

I have been adjusting to a more 2 footed technique, but still like forward pressure to always keep the tips engaged. For me this keeps me always carving in all terrain textures, even bumps. Also, the engaged tip of these firmer tipped skis absorbs much of the terrain so that my legs don't have to. Am I missing something?
post #11 of 21
Thread Starter 
I did tram laps at Big Sky yesterday. The conditions were all over the place with lots of crust, wind pack, wind fill, crud, corn, slush, etc. I saw two people fall in the steeps. One was on Dynastar Intuitiv 89s, the other Stocklis. Both did the same thing where they buried their tips by driving them through the crust into the soft stuff on a turn.

The B3s were awesome yesterday handling everything thrown at them. I really felt confident on them which was important because we were skiing in some places you didn't want to fall.
post #12 of 21
Finally someone of stature to vouch for my experiences on Rossignols.

Maybe now I will no longer be the subject of ridicule and scorn for defending the B3 and how good a ski they really are.

I felt the same way about the Volant Chubb but they didn't hold up as well.

They're classifid as Gaper skis also.
post #13 of 21
Quick comment from a Mantra owner who also likes B-3's: Mantras are insanely versatile, so they'll tolerate forward pressure, but they'll do even better if you roll them from a neutral stance. There's a thread in here somewhere about this, how complaints about shorter Mantras being too "turny," so going longer or moving the binding back, were coming from pressuring the tips too much.
post #14 of 21
i tried the b3's on a new snow day and loved them . i want to try mantras before i buy either. i sure had a ball on the b3's. but bought allstars because they match the snow i mostly get to ski on in no idaho
post #15 of 21
When I lived in Salt Lake, I met Gordy Pfiefer (the great skier with B3's in the photo) and looked at skis he had for sale in his garage. He skis for Rossi, so it is not surprising that he shows them off in the photo. But, that is not to say they are not great skis and he is doing it just cuz he gets them free. I know a couple of level 9-10 skiers in Calif who ski the B3.
post #16 of 21
Way to go, Rio.

I've been a Rossi fan for as long as I've been a skier. These are still my everyday backcountry skis:



Rossi makes good stuff.

Enjoy.
post #17 of 21
There's nothing wrong with a B3. Ski on whatever makes you the most confident, comfortable.
post #18 of 21
COPete: perhaps you have not visited the Barking Bear forum enough to see the Atomic/Head/Volkl, must be a wood core, stiff, ski to be a real ski bias here. See for example the bashing of one of the most fun skis to EVER hit the slopes, the Salomon Pocket Rocket. According to some, this "noodle" could not possibly handle steep crud-covered slopes or at least you are not a hardcore skier if you try to ski that slope in anything but a Mantra, Monster, or Sugar Daddy.
post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Billiam
COPete: perhaps you have not visited the Barking Bear forum enough to see the Atomic/Head/Volkl, must be a wood core, stiff, ski to be a real ski bias here. See for example the bashing of one of the most fun skis to EVER hit the slopes, the Salomon Pocket Rocket. According to some, this "noodle" could not possibly handle steep crud-covered slopes or at least you are not a hardcore skier if you try to ski that slope in anything but a Mantra, Monster, or Sugar Daddy.
Thats funny, I think Mantra, Monster Sugar are kinda wus.
But ok for the masses.
post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Billiam
COPete: perhaps you have not visited the Barking Bear forum enough to see the Atomic/Head/Volkl, must be a wood core, stiff, ski to be a real ski bias here. See for example the bashing of one of the most fun skis to EVER hit the slopes, the Salomon Pocket Rocket. According to some, this "noodle" could not possibly handle steep crud-covered slopes or at least you are not a hardcore skier if you try to ski that slope in anything but a Mantra, Monster, or Sugar Daddy.
Generally, this is the prevailing view on Epic (although Atomic skis aren't wood - some mysterious material called: Densolite).

The PR's and B3's are fun skis that have garnered fans by the legion. They perform well and they don't punish you. I've seen expert (level 9) skiers, who can do anything on them without overpowering or destroying the skies.

The trade-off is that you may not get the edge-bite or ballast you'll get from beefier skis.

There's no "best" ski, just the one that works for you.

Regarding Gordy: I used to share a house in Salt Lake City with the former editor of "Powder". He informed me that Gordy Pfiefer wasn't really a "finesse" skier, and went through an average of 6 pairs of B3's per year.
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by memosteve
I ski B3's, I don't consider myself a gaper. Then again as bad as I ski I'm probably a gaper anyway.

I love my B3's and my Bandit X's, although I'll probably get more of dedicated carver next season for on piste and I'm tempted to throw down a few runs on my old Authier Goldstars and Targa's just to see what I've been missing.
I love my Bandit X's too. But I'm also looking for a carving ski for next season .
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