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Hand or Roto brush?

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
Which do you use? hand brushing or roto with a drill?
What advantages & downfalls have you found from each?
post #2 of 24
hand, but ! have never tried the roto, yet...
post #3 of 24
I use both. I have a roto with a stiff brush and a cork wheel. The rotos are the quickest way to give the skis a nice polished look (with a spray bottle of water), never have any wax particles like after hand brushing. Wish I had a better drill battery, one I use dies if it sits for a time. With the hand brushes I have nylon, short horse hair and a nice long horse hair brush. I usually carry the long horse hair brush in my race shorts pocket.
post #4 of 24
After scraping, I make my first pass with a brass hand brush (40-50 passes). After that I use the roto-brush (I have two brushes with different density bristles) and I, too, sometimes use a light misting of water with a spray bottle for the final passes with the roto-brush. I then do a final pass with a softer hand brush followed by fine fibertex and a light misting of water. The result is a very, glossy finish.
BTW, I use a corded drill for the roto-brush to eliminate the battery issue. Since this is not a demanding application for a drill, the cheapest one you can find ($20) should work fine.
post #5 of 24
I use hand brushes only. Brass followed by horse hair followed by white pad and mist of water. Seems to do a good job for a recreational ski.
post #6 of 24
Rotobrushes. better finish, much less effort!
post #7 of 24
I use hand brushes because I'm a cheap bastard and they work just fine. Athough if I was waxing and brushing a demo fleet nightly, I would invest in some rotobrushes.
post #8 of 24
quickk9,
Why would anyone START with a hand brush and finish with a roto? Aren't roto's supposed to do the meat of the work?
post #9 of 24
I have been using a roto since the 99/00 season. The only way to go. I scrap the wax then use a back on fouth motion down the ski with the nylon roto. Then one smooth pull down the ski three times, right 1/3, left 1/3, and center. Done, quick and easy. If it's cold I'll follow that with a horsehair roto.
post #10 of 24
For some reason in the nordic world rotos, once the rage, went out of fashion and everyone is into the big expensive handbrushes. Only reason I've heard was some aggressive rotos supposedly removed the structure. I still think it is fashion trends.
post #11 of 24
Big E-
I start with a hand brush because it's brass and seems to remove more of the wax after scraping than the 2 roto-brushes that I have. I can't say that I have ever seen a brass roto-brush, but perhaps a roto-brush that is stiffer than the 2 that I have would eliminate the need for the brass brush.
What I described seems to work for me, but if anyone has a better suggestion I would certainly be willing to try it.
post #12 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog
Only reason I've heard was some aggressive rotos supposedly removed the structure.
brass bruss @ 50,000rpm might do that...
post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by quickk9
After scraping, I make my first pass with a brass hand brush (40-50 passes). After that I use the roto-brush (I have two brushes with different density bristles) and I, too, sometimes use a light misting of water with a spray bottle for the final passes with the roto-brush. I then do a final pass with a softer hand brush followed by fine fibertex and a light misting of water. The result is a very, glossy finish.
BTW, I use a corded drill for the roto-brush to eliminate the battery issue. Since this is not a demanding application for a drill, the cheapest one you can find ($20) should work fine.
Cordless is required for the quick overlay work using the cork and polishing done at the race shack. But yes, back at the tuning bench, a faster (higher RPM) corded drill can be an option.
post #14 of 24
I use hand brushes. One of the things I like about it is that it is a nice upper body workout.
post #15 of 24
Thread Starter 
for those of you using them, where do you purchase your brushes - the prices seem to vary widely and don't know if there is any actual quality difference. i had only ever purchased the hand brushes thru the toko rep but am considering the switch to rotos and would be hard pressed to find the guy again.
post #16 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE
quickk9,
Why would anyone START with a hand brush and finish with a roto? Aren't roto's supposed to do the meat of the work?
Only reason I know of is they may not have the right quiver of roto brushes. Various roto brushes are a nice luxury and expensive to get 2 or 3 of them vs 3 or 4 of the hand brushes. If they only have a single softer horse hair roto brush then it is the wrong tool to start out with, but a great tool to finish the polishing of the ski with. So to start out with the roto you need a harder nylon or at least a short stiff horse hair, or else a hand brush would be the start in my opinion to begin the cleaning of the structure.
post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by RShea
Cordless is required for the quick overlay work using the cork and polishing done at the race shack. But yes, back at the tuning bench, a faster (higher RPM) corded drill can be an option.
800 RPM MAX with Brass roto, be careful don't burn your bases. there is a warning printed right on the brush barrel. I use a cordless for all rotos.
post #18 of 24

So

Anyone else use a vibrating finish sander with their Fibertex yet?
post #19 of 24
since we're talking about roto brushes, when i use my cork roto, the wax sometimes gets "pasty" almost like it's being whipped up too much. anyone else experience this? any suggestions on what i'm doing wrong? or is this what's supposed to happen and i just need to use another brush to get the whipped up wax off.
post #20 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by B R
since we're talking about roto brushes, when i use my cork roto, the wax sometimes gets "pasty" almost like it's being whipped up too much. anyone else experience this? any suggestions on what i'm doing wrong? or is this what's supposed to happen and i just need to use another brush to get the whipped up wax off.
The cork roto is specifically designed for "glide Wax" only or "speed overlays: like Dominator Q6. It is not designed to be used with regular base wax. Your skis should already be completly waxed, scraped and fully brushed out with horsehair, brass and nylon and ready for 'Race Day" speed overlay or additiive. if you are not racing you don't really need the cork unless you are use some overlay. http://www.ski-racing.com/roto_brushes.html

this is probably the problem.
post #21 of 24
thanks. i'm sure that's what was happening. i stopped using it since i couldn't figure out the benefit of it. i'll save it for the overlays.
post #22 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by B R
thanks. i'm sure that's what was happening. i stopped using it since i couldn't figure out the benefit of it. i'll save it for the overlays.
Right on!
post #23 of 24
I was told by Graham Lonetto of Edgewise that roto-corking will dull your edges. Anyone else heard this. He hand corks his overlays.
post #24 of 24
Thread Starter 
im sure it might dull them if you didnt keep it perfecty flat (which might be hard to do with a heavy drill) - but using the cork manually you might bend the cork slightly over the edge and dull them as well.
i am sure there are drawbacks to both approaches.
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