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Strangers on the Lift - Page 2

post #31 of 49
I think your sensibilities are more delicate than mine. You're getting worked up about it.

I think what I have been saying is true also: If they could read your mind, they probably would have left your class or you wouldn't have gotten that great tip.

Wow. That ^^ really pushes your buttons. I wonder why? :
post #32 of 49
Because from the tone of your post, you have me painted as some redneck racist intolerant hick. But, there's a reason I got this lesson. Truth be told, I was given the run down on the situation BEFORE I got the lesson. Most times, they just give you a name and a meeting point. Not with this one. They told me the guy was a bit overbearing and had interfered with the lesson the day before. They did not give me any real info on the wife except that she didn't respond well to the coaching style of the day before (a bit more "direct" than mine), and needed something a bit more gentle. I got this lesson because of my tolerance of atypical situations like this and my ability to accept and adapt to them. For you to suggest otherwise without really knowing anything about me, pisses me off.

There are unusual situations in life. This was one of them. Lighten up.
post #33 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lonnie
Because from the tone of your post, you have me painted as some redneck racist intolerant hick. But, there's a reason I got this lesson. Truth be told, I was given the run down on the situation BEFORE I got the lesson. Most times, they just give you a name and a meeting point. Not with this one. They told me the guy was a bit overbearing and had interfered with the lesson the day before. They did not give me any real info on the wife except that she didn't respond well to the coaching style of the day before (a bit more "direct" than mine), and needed something a bit more gentle. I got this lesson because of my tolerance of atypical situations like this and my ability to accept and adapt to them. For you to suggest otherwise without really knowing anything about me, pisses me off.

There are unusual situations in life. This was one of them. Lighten up.
This is so funny. Where did I point to you being a racist in this thread? Can you quote something I said so I can understand?
post #34 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by bklyntrayc
Seems like you got the better end of the deal in this cultural exchange.
You were implying that I was intolerant because of my descriptions. I stretched your quote to what I wrote. You never said it directly, but the implication WAS there.
post #35 of 49
I disagree, but if you want to discuss further, take it to the lounge.
post #36 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by bklyntrayc
I disagree, but if you want to discuss further, take it to the lounge.
In all honesty, I don't.
post #37 of 49

Memorable meeting on a lift

It was my first day at Snowbird, and first day skiing in Utah. Fairly early in the day I'm standing in the tram line, absolutely in awe of the place, and strike up a conversation with a local. After some chat and my explaining I new little about the ways of the bird, he says "you're in luck, few people around here know this mountain like I do, and I'm going to show you around". An offer I couldn't refuse. He then spent the better part of the day taking me around to a lot of very cool spots. I had a great time skiing with this guy - couldn't thank him enough. Turned out he was an insider - told me a lot about the history of Snowbird and Alta. That absolutely made my trip. Since then I have at least a few times acted as an unofficial ambassador to my home mountain of Sugarbush, VT. I get a kick out of showing around new visitors the same way that dude did at Snowbird.
post #38 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by bklyntrayc
And this gem:
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhysicsMan
Anyway, I wound up with a big tip, but was overjoyed never to run into them again.
Good thing they couldn't read your minds, otherwise you'd have missed out on a great tip. Do you think you're tuned in to helping people enjoy their days on the slopes? :
I have zero interest in associating with someone who either truly is a criminal, or who at minimum makes every attempt (ie, actions, language, clothing) to look like one. This guy wasn't some inner-city kid playing around looking tough - we get busloads of those. This guy was a seriously mean acting, mean looking SOB, and was much harsher to his girlfriend than I indicated in my previous post (I was trying to keep it light and humorous, in line with this thread). To be honest, from the tone he used with her, I would bet you that he regularly abused her.

While I joked around earlier in the thread about why I got this particular lesson, I think that the real reason was exactly the same as why Lonnie was assigned his lesson. Namely, I seem to be able to get along with a wide variety of guests, put a smile on their faces, and get them skiing. Many other pros can do this, but some clearly can not.

I stand by my original statement that I really did not and do not perfer to be around people like this. OTOH, I will be professional, helpful, enthusiastic and courteous when I am giving someone like him a lesson, and yes, if he was happy enough with the service I rendered to offer a tip, I will take it.

Tom / PM
post #39 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bklyntrayc
Many times on the lift I get to hear from well meaning pompous "butts" on the way up. Maybe it's because they're full of preconceived notions.

Relevant to the topic, I rode the chair up in Blackcomb with an instructor early in the AM before his lessons began. He proceeded to tell me all about how it was a powder day, and what I should be doing etc. after interrogating me on where I was from and what I did for a living. As if I've never skied a powder day in my life. So I told him thanks and skied off. Ran into him at the lift and he said he didn't think I'd be such a great skier. God, how I wanted to lose that jerk. Good thing he had to head over to the lineup.
Thanks for the heads-up. I'm guilty of this and will give it thought.
post #40 of 49
I posted a story in another thread about this earlier http://forums.epicski.com/showthread...ght=Chair+lift
....Don't want to be from the department of the redundancy department, but I'll share another story.

This winter, I started a conversation with a guy on the lift. Really nice guy, usually skis with his son and dad. (dad used to race nastar) A few weeks later, I happened to get on the chair with the same guy and his son. Just kidding I challenged this kid to a race. He said ok! Holy Smokes! The kid was awesome! 9 yrs old, connected turns, totally in control, and flying! I got back on the chair with dad and son, (and my brother in law). I told the dad to get his kid on the nastar course, which was opening up in a few minutes....He did. The kid sought me out to show me his medal(silver).

I was not fortunate enough to have kids, but I love them, and day's like this make me smile!
post #41 of 49
Rode up a lift at Mary Jane last week between classes. Got to listen to this guy from the Midwest explaining how to make turns on the new skis...wrong.

After getting off the lift, got to watch him snowplowing on Bluebell.
post #42 of 49
I love listening to people giving lessons to their friends/families. Sometimes I swear it's a put up job, with Candid Camera hiding somewhere.

"Put your knees together!"
"Lean back!"
"Bring yor HANDS around!"
"LEAN into the turn! Like this!"
"Jest push yer HEELS out!"
post #43 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by ant
I love listening to people giving lessons to their friends/families. Sometimes I swear it's a put up job, with Candid Camera hiding somewhere.

"Put your knees together!"
"Lean back!"
"Bring yor HANDS around!"
"LEAN into the turn! Like this!"
"Jest push yer HEELS out!"
Yes, with that first critical lesson being given on a Black Diamond. :
post #44 of 49

Best Ski Lift Ride

This year while in a little hurry to get back to roll call/lineup I jumped on the chair with a single boarder. After sitting down and exchanging the usual "its a nice day", I actually looked at this person and observed the oldest looking boarder I've ever seen: Obviously this guy had a hard and long life. Grey thinning hair, craggy skin, sunken eyes and all the signs of having worked his whole life in the silver mines. He looked just shy of 80 years HARD YEARS! We and he discussed his new love of riding the board, how great the snow was and what powder he was going to ride today with his l season of riding experience. Just before we parted at the top I asked him how many years he had been on the mountains of life and learned he was 59 yrs old. I was shocked! The good news is, what a guy taking up snowboarding at 59yrs and enjoying life. The startling news was that he is older than me and boy was that a humbling experience. I didn't get his name and regret that, hope to see him again and hope he had a great year and many more. Me too.
post #45 of 49
Not quite a lift and no personal interaction, but one of the most memorable things I've ever seen was an elderly, rather portly gentleman getting onto the shuttle bus in Courchevel about 4 years ago with his over 72s free 3V season pass in one hand and a snowboard in the other.
post #46 of 49
I enjoy most of my rides up. The most memorable this year was during Sundance. I rode up with a guy who financed movies and his friend who was the director of a film that was showing at the festival. I didn't get their names but the financier was only on his second day and the director was taking him all over the mountain, way beyond his skill level. They were a couple of the nicest guys I met this year and I got a kick out of the way the skilled skier was pushing his friend out of his comfort zone. The dialogue between the two was great. Both were from New York and had thick accents and were extremely articulate and loud.
post #47 of 49

okolepuka ..

Noo-Yaw-Kers .... wit' thick accents and loud too?

Shows us yer' nuttin' but a cheep "stooge" fer' dat Lonnie guy!
post #48 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki
Noo-Yaw-Kers .... wit' thick accents and loud too?

Shows us yer' nuttin' but a cheep "stooge" fer' dat Lonnie guy!
Ha! I thoroughly enjoyed the ride up, a couple of swell fellas.

I love New York though, maybe that had something to do with it. Wouldn't live there but love to visit.
post #49 of 49
Some of my most memorable lift rides have been with "Frank" at Copper Mtn. Frank is over 80 and skis nearly EVERY DAY at Copper. He is one of the initial investors (buyer of a slope side home) in Copper and as such has a lifetime pass. Frank is retired engineer and he logs every run. I read once in a local newspaper that he skis a HUGE amount of vertical each season and from what I have seen, I am not surprized.
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