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April Fools Joke on Me - Bent my Volants!

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I managed to bend my Machete Sins today at WP. I'd like to say it happened doing something really cool and risky, but no - it happened on a run out after we finished some trees. I caught an edge while not paying attention and ended up burying the tips of my skis into an embankment running along the side. When I got off the run out onto the normal run I noticed my right ski tip flopping up and down quite a bit.

When I put them base to base the contact between them stops about an inch ahead of the binding toe pieces and there's about 3" between the tips at the widest point. Ugh : .

So has anyone ever had any success bending skis back to normal? I highly doubt this is possible, but I thought I'd ask. The skis are out of warranty, but I might call Atomic for a chuckle.

Phil - now you can say "told you so!"
post #2 of 15
Bummer...

But, call 'em. It can't hurt. Also, Gart was able to find some for a friend of mine--cheap. So, possible you can replace them.

Were these the newly polished ones?
post #3 of 15
It just goes to show that those darn Volants aren't worth having, and as a public service I would be glad to dispose of any Volants over 180cm that anyone has the good sense to eliminate from their quivers.
post #4 of 15
The V2 Volants are prone to bending..I have bent almost every pair I have had, I sold the FB;s after 3 days on snow.
post #5 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler
So has anyone ever had any success bending skis back to normal? I highly doubt this is possible, but I thought I'd ask. The skis are out of warranty, but I might call Atomic for a chuckle.
Oh sh..!

My colleague bend Voelks (think it was Carve 3 or something like that) after a fall on hard piste last spring. Tried to bent back, but no success. Have new pair of skis now.
post #6 of 15
Noodler...Put the ski to rest, it will never be the same if you try to bend it back. The ski will also be weaker and prone to rebending.
post #7 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantman
Noodler...Put the ski to rest, it will never be the same if you try to bend it back. The ski will also be weaker and prone to rebending.
Ya know, I totally think you're right, but check this out. I have a ski tuning bench with the typical World Cup style vise. I've found that if I put the tip/tail supports at their highest point and push the middle of the ski between (kind of through) the jaws of the vise, I can introduce one hell of a reverse bend into the ski (bent in the direction of the original camber). I left the ski like this for a day and much of the bend has disappeared.

Now I now that the metal top sheet and wood core have got to be weakened so that it would re-bend fairly easily (maybe on the first turn or hitting the first mogul), but I'm not a metalurgist. Could heating the ski allow the atoms/molecules of the metal top sheet to "realign" and kind of reform so that the ski has snap and isn't weak anymore? The Volants are kind of a special case since their construction is fairly different from most skis.

If there's anything to this idea then I've come up with a way to introduce heat gently and regularly to the ski over time. I could setup the vise on my back deck (mount the vise to the deck rails) and leave the skis in the Summer sun. My thermometer out back reads like 110 degrees in the Summer (with the direct sunlight). I'd let the skis heat up in the day and cool each night. If I left a ski in the vise on the back deck for a week in the Summer what would I get? Of course I'd have to fight off edge rust with WD-40 or something, but is this just an absolutely insane idea or is there something to it?
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler
Ya know, I totally think you're right, but check this out. I have a ski tuning bench with the typical World Cup style vise. I've found that if I put the tip/tail supports at their highest point and push the middle of the ski between (kind of through) the jaws of the vise, I can introduce one hell of a reverse bend into the ski (bent in the direction of the original camber). I left the ski like this for a day and much of the bend has disappeared.

Now I now that the metal top sheet and wood core have got to be weakened so that it would re-bend fairly easily (maybe on the first turn or hitting the first mogul), but I'm not a metalurgist. Could heating the ski allow the atoms/molecules of the metal top sheet to "realign" and kind of reform so that the ski has snap and isn't weak anymore? The Volants are kind of a special case since their construction is fairly different from most skis.

If there's anything to this idea then I've come up with a way to introduce heat gently and regularly to the ski over time. I could setup the vise on my back deck (mount the vise to the deck rails) and leave the skis in the Summer sun. My thermometer out back reads like 110 degrees in the Summer (with the direct sunlight). I'd let the skis heat up in the day and cool each night. If I left a ski in the vise on the back deck for a week in the Summer what would I get? Of course I'd have to fight off edge rust with WD-40 or something, but is this just an absolutely insane idea or is there something to it?
Duuuuude, yoooou arrrrre absoluuuuutely insaaaaane!!!!!!!
post #9 of 15
Since you are an engineer, I think we are going to have to resort to more convincing arguments. Bending the ski caused bonds in the laminate structure to break. With metal sheets in the ski, you were able to re-introduce the original shape to the ski, but not the strength. Would heat work to repair the broken cross-linked polymers. Well, no. Those are formed by a catalytic reaction while the resin is in a liquid state. We don't know of a laminate technology to repair delaminations or fractured bonds without re-introducing liquid resin and catalyzing it. Now, if you could open up the structure of the ski and inject catalyzed resin, we might be talking about something.


BTW, April fools.
post #10 of 15
Actually These skis can be made as good as new! Better even!

Every ski is marked with a code number, sometimes confused as a serial number, but it really is a code. The number is usually located on the side somewhere near the boot and binding location.

If the numbers 2 and 4 appear in the code in any order of sequence, The ski just needs to rotated in such a way the the 4 is located in front of the 2 to get the numerals 42. Low end and rental skis often don't have the correct numbers. The good skis usually do.
This shifting and reorienting of numbers often requires some creative clamping, heating and/or spinning, but it can be done.
Once the numbers are brought into the correct order, the ski will simply reconstruct it's self from the inside out to be better than when new. Just rub across the base with a damp spounge! Unfortunately, the bases and edges and topsheet are not covered by this procedure. Some kind of planned obsolecence sales and marketing thing.
This works for all skis regardless of manufacturer! It's all determined by the code designer and all the ski companies are licensed to use it.

By the way, the 42 trick works for all sorts of things, just see the thread in this forum!.

I hope this helps! CalG.





You
post #11 of 15
Apparently at the end of the last day of last year's season I bent the tip on one of my Volants, however I did not know it at the time (no comments please about end of season parties...). I used said pair of skis on the first day of the new season, after three runs I finally figured out why I could not ski...
post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider
Since you are an engineer, I think we are going to have to resort to more convincing arguments. Bending the ski caused bonds in the laminate structure to break. With metal sheets in the ski, you were able to re-introduce the original shape to the ski, but not the strength. Would heat work to repair the broken cross-linked polymers. Well, no. Those are formed by a catalytic reaction while the resin is in a liquid state. We don't know of a laminate technology to repair delaminations or fractured bonds without re-introducing liquid resin and catalyzing it. Now, if you could open up the structure of the ski and inject catalyzed resin, we might be talking about something.
Wow, you brought up some issues I did not consider at all - and unfortunately you're definitely right. The resins that had bonded the layers are most likely all separated now. Even if the metal takes the new "shape" the ski would never perform like it had previously. Oh well. I knew it didn't make much sense or I would have heard about someone else doing it before. Thanks.
post #13 of 15

All is not lost. Be Brave! Forge ahead!

Find an old pair of FX 2s or Zmaxs (+ a sawzall) and T-bolt them on: "plates" that run the whole length of the ski.

Quote:
Even if the metal takes the new "shape" the ski would never perform like it had previously.
Well, if you're determined to be picky. . .








Posted 4/1/2006 in spirit
post #14 of 15
Just stick 'em in the microwave.
post #15 of 15
Stick with the full metal jacket Volants... they don't bend.
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