New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Deb Armstrong - Page 7

post #181 of 201
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
The frightening thing for me when we discuss all of this is that I believe that I have more awareness than many of the folks that I have had the pleasure to teach. That tells me that I need to be mindful that they are not going to have the body awareness of a RicB, BigE, or (obviously) a Deb Armstrong. Instead, they probably have no real awareness of how they are creating edge angles (or not) or pressuring their skis.

So, how do we help them connect the dots?
Even if we have developed excellent body awareness, it still doesn't mean we will get to the "moves" right away. I guess we all just work with what we have, but I don't think anyone is interested in developing less body awareness, so this leaves us with one direction to go, and a lifetime to do it in. I'll say it again though, tai chi has given me a level of structural awareness that I never would have gotten to otherwise, I think.

How to help connect the dots is the $64,000 question. Personaly I will try anything and everything to get my students relaxed, moving and playing with things that hopefully will elicit changes in what they feel and do, and help them make connections between what they do and how the ski works.

To quote a wise woman from her book on tai chi, "tai chi is not fragile". I think good skiing as well as good teaching is the same. It's not precious and it won't break if we go outside of the norm or try it differently. To me this is were discovery lies, outside of what we are alredy doing.

In the end Steve, I don't have any better handle on it that you or anyone else who takes their soprt and teaching to heart. I did get the "I make stuff up" award this spring at our ski school banquet. I guess that is like saying, "I slept in a holiday inn last night" though. Later, RicB.
post #182 of 201
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro
It reminds me of a good musician vs. a great musician.
The good musicians can play a piece but a really great musician makes it their own by bending the rules a little.
Huh?

Good teachers can teach but great ones "bend the rules"?

What does that mean?
post #183 of 201
This is going to lead on to Bode, isn't it?
post #184 of 201
No Martin it isn't. At least not from me.
E,
It means there is more to it than just the technical. All of us have unique characteristics that define our skiing. Turn production without a little of this is pretty lifeless because it is the dreaded cookie cutter approach and a final form mentality. Mass production instead of hand crafted. While we should ski similarly (doing the same task of course), we should not all look identical.
BTW I said nothing about teachers.
post #185 of 201
Oh sorry! The skier is the musician. See, I told you analogies are not my bag!

Thanks.

Edit: The "great musician" could still play the "final form" on demand. In other words, you have to become a good musicion before you can be a great musician.
post #186 of 201
So we should know how to "do it right" before we start experimenting. The hard part is defining what is "right"; the trap that we may fall into is that when studying the world's best, we may mistake the "experimenting" for the "right".
post #187 of 201
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Bell
So we should know how to "do it right" before we start experimenting. The hard part is defining what is "right"; the trap that we may fall into is that when studying the world's best, we may mistake the "experimenting" for the "right".
Boy, ain't that just the truth? And this is where so many discussions of technique get derailed (especially when based on what the best in the world are doing).

It also gets back to intent, I think. So frequently we think we understand the skier's intent. We pass judgement based on our independent understanding of the intent (i.e., without asking!), and then head off into the philosophical yonder without really making an assessment of our foundational concepts (the most foundations of which, to my thinking, is intent).

Is there a "right" based on a particular intent? Is there a "right" which is independent of intent?
post #188 of 201
A variation on a theme, still requires a theme as a starting point.
post #189 of 201
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Bell
So we should know how to "do it right" before we start experimenting. The hard part is defining what is "right"; the trap that we may fall into is that when studying the world's best, we may mistake the "experimenting" for the "right".
Or worse, we may mistake a single set of photos in one series of gates for the right. Or even worse, we may mistake a huge error by a hot skier for the right. Or even the most awful, we may mistake something somebody else besides me said for the right.
post #190 of 201
Everybody needs a good understanding of a solid broad foundation to build on. They can take it anywhere they want, but they need to start somewhere.

To borrow an analogy from another domain, even Bruce Lee (probably best known martial artist in this hemisphere) who advocated his martial art, jeet kune do (sp?), as a "style-free" style started with an established "style" (wing chun).
post #191 of 201
Attachment 686

Quote:
we may mistake a single set of photos in one series of gates for the right. Or even worse, we may mistake a huge error by a hot skier for the right.
The above shot is Andrea Mead Lawrence on her way to gold in the gs at Olso, 1952. She looks very modern yet if we saw this image in motion it would look very old fashioned. You are right Weems, when looking at a photo of a particular moment in time we need to be careful. If we are aware of the shortcomings of a single frame photo then it can be very helpful.
525x525px-LL-vbattach686.jpg
post #192 of 201
Thread Starter 
However, you can't mistake the intensity in that face!
post #193 of 201
Imagine how she'd rip on shapes!
post #194 of 201
She has inside tip lead!!!!
post #195 of 201
E,
I imagine if we put on skis like that we would have a greater appreciation for what she is doing.
post #196 of 201
Quote:
Originally Posted by weems
Or worse, we may mistake a single set of photos in one series of gates for the right. Or even worse, we may mistake a huge error by a hot skier for the right. Or even the most awful, we may mistake something somebody else besides me said for the right.
Two words: "Jet turn".
post #197 of 201
The above shot is Andrea Mead Lawrence on her way to gold in the gs at Olso, 1952. She looks very modern yet if we saw this image in motion it would look very old fashioned.

A question. If this is Oslo 1952 why is she wearing a Sun Valley bib? I love that photo. The expression is priceless, "The Eye of the Tiger" if I've ever seen it.

Ken
post #198 of 201
GOOD POINT. sorry for that. I should have left it as AML, gold medalist of 1952.
post #199 of 201
Thread Starter 
These guys don't miss a trick, Deb!
post #200 of 201
That is what I appreciate so much about this site Weems. These guys keep us on our toes and that is a great thing!!!
post #201 of 201
Just yesterday I sat re-reading Deb's TPS article recounting her battle with death over the summer of '04. In the picture of her on discharge day, I noticed a white board behind her. On it was the date, three specific goals for the day, and her theme for recovery: "Strong Like Bull".

I have a lot to learn from a champion who understands the power of specific goals in front of her face to get them done. Thanks, again, Deb.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching