or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Problem on steeps - Page 2

post #31 of 44
Yes, except those are rally cars....







post #32 of 44
Yessss, we are talking serious skidding here .... I shure miss my old rearweeldrive volvos! Now driving on snow and gravel is like wedging due to front weel drive and all of that electronic stuff like ASR, BAS, ABS etc...
post #33 of 44
Steve Smith, I agree with JASP, try skiing the steeps with softer rather than harsher edging movements to remove chatter and bounce.

BigE, I'm glad you used that quote. It's my favorite one from the list. It seems to sum up why balance is so critical to skiing: without it, one's ability to move is limited. With it, the movement options are almost limitless.
post #34 of 44
nolo,

I looked back into Lisamarie's "energy leaks" thread. It has some interesting stuff about this sort of thing, and why athletes can/cannot perform certain tasks.

In that thread the "sport specific skills" sit at the top of the pyramid with movement/athletic abilities sorted out into two layers that make up the bottom -- ability to move at the base, and functional performance (incl power) in the middle.

The issue of loss of control due to skidding while attempting to carve (arc-to-arc) MAY come as a result of poor balance or it may be a result of many other things. However, weak balance is usually the root cause.

As taught by the CSIA, balance is so entirely overwhelming I would bet that in any random MA video of a recreational skier the root cause of their problem will be found there. It would be extremely rare to find their key problems in the blend of the other skills that they have chosen to apply.

I'll offer this up as anecdotal evidence:

There was another epic poster (ugh, the name escapes me -vince?) whose group teaches only two key elements to ski improvement:

1) balance
2) commitment to the outside ski.

He claims that his students show remarkable improvements from these two elements alone.
post #35 of 44
Here's a though provoking statement... Well maybe/not....
Balancing skills are needed and present all the time because we are attempting to remain relatively upright while moving over uneven terrain. However, since we are moving, balancing is somewhat of a misnomer because an unbalanced sum of forces is what is creating the movement in the first place. While this seems to be a contradiction, we can resolve this by calling this dynamic balancing.
Dynamic balancing assumes slightly unbalanced states. This is further assumed to mean that the unbalanced state is caused by willfull movement of our body. Not simply because we are falling down the hill in an uncontrolled way. A positive effect means we are actively managing all of this and keeping our options as open as possible.
post #36 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro
Dynamic balancing assumes slightly unbalanced states. This is further assumed to mean that the unbalanced state is caused by willfull movement of our body. Not simply because we are falling down the hill in an uncontrolled way. A positive effect means we are actively managing all of this and keeping our options as open as possible.
This is where I was coming from earlier in the tread, just much more eloquently stated.

Just because we are out of balance for a moment, doesn't not mean we are out of control.
post #37 of 44
Here is a brief article that contains a good description of "dynamic balance" that does not have the contradictory elements.

http://umanitoba.fitdv.com/new/artic...html?artid=309

Cheers!
post #38 of 44
sprint cars. Funny. Again,....if you read what I have written you will see that I advocate feathering your edges, not pure carving. But I also advocate that too much skidding = loss of control. Feathering your edges does not gain control...all that does is allow you to shave some speed, while losing only a tiny bit of control. The more your edges skid, the more you give up some control of your skis.

Those sprint cars are not as in control as if they were not sliding sideways. Besides they are heavily tuned and designed to function that way. A better example would be a nascar car. One of those very skilled drivers can know how to drift a turn and in indeed sometimes that is exactly what they try to do..however...they are still sacrificing just a little bit of control when they drift, as opposed to when their tires are sticking like glue. They are experts at knowing how to get the control back or how to go to the edge of control without going over into complete loss of control. That's part of what makes them experts.

Either way...skidding is loss of control... carving is control. Somewhere in between is where you want to be on steeps, but I think most skiers that try as hard as they can to carve on steeps will in fact end up somewhere in between. So that really should be your focus.
post #39 of 44
Lonnie,
Balancing movements imply seeking balance as an intended outcome because it facilitates more control options.

Control also assume this because we want to keep our options as open as possible. Just in case we encounter an unexpected change in the snow or terrain.
Getting back to the idea of pressure control for a minute...
Smoother does not always mean using a tipping bias and arcing/carving. An old book I have (I believe Nolo also has this book) mentions this and offers an analogy that still applies fifty years later. The context is "how to do a gliding wedge" but follow me for a minute and I think you will see why I am using this example.
Think of speading butter instead of pushing the snow. If snow is building up under your skis you are overedging or over pressuring the edged skis. Which IMO is the reason for the unintended results (chatter) mentioned in the original post. So the question becomes what do you or can you do to minimize that chatter? I choose to manage the pressure more actively throughout the entire turn. Not just at the end of the turn.
post #40 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro
Think of speading butter instead of pushing the snow. If snow is building up under your skis you are overedging or over pressuring the edged skis. Which results in chatter. So the question becomes what do you do to minimize that chatter? I choose to manage the pressure more actively throughout the entire turn. Not just at the end of the turn.
I see where you're going with the spreading butter thing...and I like it...
post #41 of 44
OOPs, you caught me editing that post.
post #42 of 44
yea I think managing the pressue is also a key element to maintaining control in the steeps. Its another way of bleeding off some of the G-forces without throwing the skis into a total skid.
post #43 of 44
The key is choosing an application to match the location and the situation. I brought many a rescue sled down a steep slope using nothing more than a sideslip. Because nothing is more stable or controlled.
post #44 of 44
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the discussion, I think this is the longest post I've ever started
I've got some ideas to work on. I know I'm not far off, last time it happened it was only when I turned in one direction and not the other.

Steve
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching