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frozen in the wilds/survival ..

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
All of these "Storm Stories" on the Weather Channel are getting to me. The survivors and their "heroic endeavors" and incredible fortitude despite all odds crap is making me gag.

Two themes .... snow mobile party lost and frozen for two days ...

or ... A skier/boarder in a closed area gets in deep and lost.

All of these guys have packs and storage compartments. How the hell do you freeze with five gallons of gas three feet away from you. A simple tarp and a micro stove in the storage compartment and you have heat and shelter.

Toss in a dozen hand warmers in the f'ing pack. Stuff two inside and under your base layer in the kidney area and you have core heat for the night. Alternate one warmer glove to glove.

The kidney warmer system dates back to the 1940's with the old Jon-E hand and kidney belt (two warmers) ... kinda' like a big Zippo lighter ... closed top with a slow burn rate.

$6000 snow mobile ..... or .... $500 board and $200 pack with a $300 GPS and a $200 beacon in the pack ..... and freeze to death for failure to spend $20 ... ?????
post #2 of 18
Just watch shows like American Hot Rod and American Chopper. They can make building cars and bikes into a nail biter. Editing, its all about editing.
post #3 of 18
Darwinism, Yuki. Get 'em out of the gene pool. We'll all be better off.
post #4 of 18
Thread Starter 
Oooooooooh ... so unkind .. where is the humanity .. oh where? Oh where?

But I like it.
post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 

mother nature

The kicker in last nights "Storm Story" was that the guy, rescued after three days has gone back to boarding in the outback.

He's now missing a few toes on each foot.

I guess Mother Nature still has one more shot at him.
post #6 of 18
How about the guy who lived alone in Alaska for 30+ years, Richard Proenneke. Built his own cabin, no running water or electricity, caught, shot or grew most of his own food. There's a PBS special about him and his life, and at the end of the show, an announcer says '... after X years, he decided the minus 25 degree winters were too much and he moved back to Iowa to be near his family'. The gene pool has it's stars, too.
post #7 of 18
One word. Panic! Ever lose the clicker. I imagine it has to be worse that that.
post #8 of 18
I have not had the pleasure of viewing this program.

Is it a program made up of actual stories or a "reality program"?

Either way...Wish I'd watched it!
post #9 of 18
Camelbak, Hand warmers out the wazoo, "The worst case scenario handbook" all in my pack.
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElkMountainSkier
How about the guy who lived alone in Alaska for 30+ years, Richard Proenneke. Built his own cabin, no running water or electricity, caught, shot or grew most of his own food. There's a PBS special about him and his life, and at the end of the show, an announcer says '... after X years, he decided the minus 25 degree winters were too much and he moved back to Iowa to be near his family'. The gene pool has it's stars, too.

I love this documentary!
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElkMountainSkier
How about the guy who lived alone in Alaska for 30+ years, Richard Proenneke. Built his own cabin, no running water or electricity, caught, shot or grew most of his own food. There's a PBS special about him and his life, and at the end of the show, an announcer says '... after X years, he decided the minus 25 degree winters were too much and he moved back to Iowa to be near his family'. The gene pool has it's stars, too.
Most Iowans live that way anyway and survive.
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick
I have not had the pleasure of viewing this program.

Is it a program made up of actual stories or a "reality program"?

Either way...Wish I'd watched it!
There are two or three books, and a PBS show about it. The PBS stations around here play the show around donation time. Alone in the Wildenress and One Man's Wilderness, forgot which is the book and which is the video. Search for Dick Proenneke. Or Twin Lakes, Alaska, where he stayed. Wikipedia has an interesting write up.
post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 
The beauty of the story of Richard's life in Alaska was with the way each item was fashioned by hand. The wooded hinges on the doors and windows .. beyond description.

I had an uncle like that. He could make anything from nothing by hand and I get a bit misty eyed thinking of the two of them. If there is an afterlife, those two have found each other and are building something ...

Men of true zen ..... and had probably never pondered the word ... they just lived it!
post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 

SkiStar90

Ain't it amazing with that simple and cheap "technology" .... how many of your friends go out like do?
post #15 of 18
Another amazing part of the Proenneke story is how he filmed himself, his life, his cabin, the wood working, all the mountains and wildlife, with very old wind up cameras. Most of the video is that stuff edited together with him doing the narration.
post #16 of 18
A couple of years ago, Hurricane Floyd hit and I had over 9 feet of water around my house. My 12 yr old kid was in charge of packing a bag for each of us while my husband & I tried to get the kayaks out and put the cat in a carrier. When we got to the shelter, we were the best prepared because our daughter had packed each of us a bag that contained dry clothes & toiletries. The cat had her own bag with cat food. On the other hand, my 40 something neighbors let their kid wade through the water for fun and then evacuated with only the wet clothes they had on. The woman across the street evacuated wearing her 4 inch high heels (and no toothbrush). It made us very aware that most people lack any survival skills at all.
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki

All of these guys have packs and storage compartments. How the hell do you freeze with five gallons of gas three feet away from you. A simple tarp and a micro stove in the storage compartment and you have heat and shelter.
Even more basic than the tarp & micro stove is the snowcave & stove. Then again, I doubt these rocket scientists have the brains to avoid Carbon Monoxide poisoning...:
post #18 of 18
Thread Starter 
More difficult in snow but ... if you can get some stones and build a fire ring, you can keep the rocks "in rotation" after heating them. A layer of soil .. and spruce boughs as an overlay and you will be very warm for a few hours.

I did use this for two very cold nights with no shelter ... but no snow to deal with. The ideal is to dig a shallow pit, heat the rocks and cover with the soil and some foliage.
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