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post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
What's everyone's favourite ski-teaching/self-improvement text?
post #2 of 14
Elling, The All-Mountain Skier. Good basic overview of everything.

What I would like to see more of in this type of text is 1) a section for each category (carving, bumps, etc.) that addresses a skill-progression "pyramid" for different levels of skier (or rider) similar to a "route pyramid" for climbers (see The Self-Coached Climber by Hague/Hunter for I think the best coverage of this that I've seen for any sport), and 2) a more explicit discussion of how to get positive feedback for when you're performing a skill correctly.

Also, crosstraining, including diving or trampoline for hucking, mountainbiking, etc. has never been covered that well imo.

Finally, a "road to..." approach, similar to the "Road to the Nose" PDF that Chris McNamara offers at www.supertopo.com for climbing, I think would be great. Perhaps a "Road to Gunbarrel or Goat" for bumps, a "Road to Pucker Face" for steeps, a "Road to 50" for hucks.
post #3 of 14
Ron LeMaster
post #4 of 14
That book that Fastman is writing seems pretty good
post #5 of 14
Power Skiing Illustrated. Priciples Of The Dynamic Technique by Tyler Micoleau.

Published in 1949. Hand drawn illustations that convey movment and energy.

Refers to skis as "Those highly polished hickory wings"
Any Bears can barrow it if you want.
post #6 of 14
Elling's "The All Mountain Skier"
post #7 of 14
Ron LeMaster, "The Skiers Edge". Also, I liked the DesLauriers brother's "Ski the Whole Mountain".
post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook
Elling, The All-Mountain Skier. Good basic overview of everything.

What I would like to see more of in this type of text is 1) a section for each category (carving, bumps, etc.) that addresses a skill-progression "pyramid" for different levels of skier (or rider) similar to a "route pyramid" for climbers (see The Self-Coached Climber by Hague/Hunter for I think the best coverage of this that I've seen for any sport), and 2) a more explicit discussion of how to get positive feedback for when you're performing a skill correctly.

Also, crosstraining, including diving or trampoline for hucking, mountainbiking, etc. has never been covered that well imo.

Finally, a "road to..." approach, similar to the "Road to the Nose" PDF that Chris McNamara offers at www.supertopo.com for climbing, I think would be great. Perhaps a "Road to Gunbarrel or Goat" for bumps, a "Road to Pucker Face" for steeps, a "Road to 50" for hucks.
there goes my target date.......
post #9 of 14
I'm rather partial to the latest book on my shelf, Weems's Brilliant Skiing, Every Day.
post #10 of 14

Further re positive reinforcement

I almost feel I should have mentioned Karen Pryor's Don't Shoot the Dog as well. This is a nominally a dog training book, but deals more generally with the whole issue of shaping movement patterns, i.e. I think much of it is transferable to teaching skiing in terms of the need for positive reinforcement. There are a few areas where direct positive reinforcement, similar to that used in dog clicker training, just naturally occur. For instance, hiking a rail or box in the park, when you get something you've been working on other people who have been hiking as well cheer, and there is no pain. Amazing reinforcement.

Freeskiing or freeriding it is very important in my view to try to ski or ride with people who like to see others do well to get this same reinforcement. Addressing ways to produce this environment -- for instance, asking one's ski partners to watch you ski a section and clap, once, every time they see you pressure the shovel for turn initiation, but not otherwise -- I think would be a real addition to the skiing literature.
post #11 of 14
Very interesting. Thanks for that..
post #12 of 14
Skiing and the Art of Carving - Ellen Post Foster

There is also a companion video that is just great. I have both.

http://tpsf.org/carvingbookvideo.html
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook
Elling, The All-Mountain Skier. Good basic overview of everything.

What I would like to see more of in this type of text is 1) a section for each category (carving, bumps, etc.) that addresses a skill-progression "pyramid" for different levels of skier (or rider) similar to a "route pyramid" for climbers (see The Self-Coached Climber by Hague/Hunter for I think the best coverage of this that I've seen for any sport), and 2) a more explicit discussion of how to get positive feedback for when you're performing a skill correctly.

Also, crosstraining, including diving or trampoline for hucking, mountainbiking, etc. has never been covered that well imo.

Finally, a "road to..." approach, similar to the "Road to the Nose" PDF that Chris McNamara offers at www.supertopo.com for climbing, I think would be great. Perhaps a "Road to Gunbarrel or Goat" for bumps, a "Road to Pucker Face" for steeps, a "Road to 50" for hucks.
Elling's book is pretty comprehensive, and there is a great deal of fantastic, technical info there. My big pet peeve with that book though: it uses the feminine pronoun when referring to the skier (most of the time, which makes it even worse). I have always found this very disconcerting when an author uses this method in writing. The masculine pronouns he, him and his, have traditionally been gender neutral for the most part, so why break with tradition? And what makes it worse is that it's not standardized throughout the book. Most of the time he uses the feminine pronoun when referring to skiers (but not always), but uses the masculine pronoun when making analogies to athletes in other sports. I know it's just me, but I kind of have to stop reading, and I start to ponder developmental psychology and wonder what happened in childhhood to these authors that make them want to employ this technique I know, all you Montessori people out there will be saying it's empowering to women, and women have been repressed for far too long now....yada yada yada. It's like when I hear a guy say that he went to Taco Bell to get a burrito, and his wife got a burrita. Something just wrong about it.

Other than that, the book is great.
post #14 of 14
SKIING
AN ART... A TECHNIQUE

Joubert: It's still a classic
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