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My boots are soaked!

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
I don't know if this thread is in the right place, so here it goes. My feet sweat in the worst way. My liners are soaked after skiing yesterday. Any good way to stop this or I am just cursed with nasty sweaty feet? I pulled the liners out and have been using a blow drier to dry them out. Thanks in advance for anyones two-cents worth.

Chrisfish
post #2 of 26
Have you tried spraying anti perspirant on your feet and changing your socks when you stop for lunch?
post #3 of 26
Thread Starter 

Yes and NO ...

I have changed my socks at lunch. I am usually too lazy to bring carry extra socks with me. I haven't tried the anti-perspirant. I have done that for flyfishing and never really considered it skiing. I will give it a shot. Thanks!

Chrisfish
post #4 of 26
What's the actual problem caused by your wet feet? Are your feet cold, or is it just the hassle of blow drying your boots, or does it cause your foot some other discomfort? Stinky liners?

If it's a problem drying your boot, get boot dryers. Somewhere in here there's a thread about cheap, effective, and portable dryers.

If cold feet are a problem, you should make sure that the heat of your foot is causing condensation, which is creating part of the moisture. Some people suggest wearing thinner socks, or using 'boot gloves'.
post #5 of 26
Second the advice for boot dryers. I don't know how long you're working the hairdryer - but I'd bet that in order to fully dry out a wet liner it would take hours. Boot dryer that blows room-temp air is best, and lets you walk away from the boots as soon as you take them off.
post #6 of 26
Thread Starter 

Boot Dryers?

About what do they cost? How long do they take to dry a boot? Do you still pull the liners out? I started drying my liners yesterday with a hairdryer on a cool setting and they still aren't dry! A thinner sock wouldn't help. My feet sweat in dress socks and dress shoes! Thanks for your help and let me know any thoughts on boot dryers.

Chrisfish
post #7 of 26
Exactly the point - the blow dryer trick is not going to work. For $75 you can get this: http://cozywinters.com/shop/ch-p100.html. There are others on that site too, not sure of prices. Leave the liners in the boots, turn on the dryer, and even with very wet feet, your boots are dry by the next morning at the latest. I have that model from Chinook with an extra set of boot hoses. It's worked great for at least 5 years.
post #8 of 26
Thread Starter 

Thanks ...

Now I have an idea of what I am looking for when I shop. Have a great rest of your ski season.

Chrisfish
post #9 of 26
My family has similar problems. Antiperspirant like Mitchum is part of the solution and the boot dryer is the other part. Use both. I'm told the antiperspirant is a delayed and cumulative effect so it will take a few days for it help with the perspiration.
post #10 of 26
There's a thread about boot dryers around here someplace.

There's a $20 product that's just 2 6 inch long sticks that dry with radient heat. Several people here use them or some varient. It will dry my boots overnight. I like these especially for traveling, since they're no hassle. You don't have to remove your liners - just throw the sticks in, plug in, and go to bed. In certain conditions, I can get my boots squishy wet and these things have always gotten my boots completely dry overnight. YMMV.
post #11 of 26

Is snow or water seeping in?

I thought my wet socks were perspiration, until I closely examined my boots. there were gaps were snow and water could enter. Take out the liner and get a small flashlight. In a dark room, put the flashlight inside the shell and buckle it down to normal skiing settings. I bet there are some gaps which will be clearly visable. Plug em up. gordo
post #12 of 26
Thread Starter 

Gordopost,

I am almost 100% sure it is just my feet. When I fly fish my feet are always soaked. That is when I am using brand new waders! The boots I use for skiing are brand new, but it hasn't mattered over the years. Whether I have rented or not, my feet just keep sweating! I will check the boots to be on the safe side!

Chrisfish
post #13 of 26
duct tape, anti-perspirant, and boot dryers
post #14 of 26
I'd say Purchase Another or two more liners and switch off each day or so. (Depending on how much u ski) And also having a boot dryer for the pair of liners you used the day before so every day u have nice dry boots. Also if you ski at a interwest resort usually they have clubs and such you can join and while you're eating you can put you're boots in your locker witch has a boot dryer in it also.
post #15 of 26
cf - I share your pain.

Thinner socks may or may not work. I wear a pair of women's knee high nylons for a "ski sock". Nylon doesn't absorb moisture, so it gets passed into the liner. Even on a colder day (-5 to upper teens) my liners get pretty damp and soaked if the temps get warm 20+F.

I do two things:
- when skiing for more than 3 days in a row, I rotate liners.
- when skiing 3 days or less in a row, I use AirDry Plus dryers. One hour before skiing, 30-45 minutes at lunch (if I go home), and 2.0 hours after skiing. The AirDrys are plugged into an autotimer, so they crank up again for an hour the next morning before skiing. This drys the liner inside, but if I pull the liners, there is still some moisture between the shell and liner. Before leaving for the week, I pull the liners and let them dry in open air until the next weekend. (Sprayed with a good dose of Fabreeze or deodorizer first.)

The AirDry+ dryers (now called DryGuy Thermo dryers) fit tight into the boot cuff and "pressurize" the boot. Warm air (body temp) is blown through a tube into the toe area, and is forced back up and out of the boot through a hole in the blower case. This carries the moisture with it. Starts me off with a dry interior for the day when skiing 2-3 days in a row, but I know there is still moisture inside the shell. Only way I've found to completely dry everything is to pull the liners.

Good luck!
post #16 of 26
I agree with the anti-persiperant idea. I've never used it, but people who have say it works fine.
post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by medmarkco
cf - Thinner socks may or may not work. I wear a pair of women's knee high nylons for a "ski sock". Nylon doesn't absorb moisture, so it gets passed into the liner. Even on a colder day (-5 to upper teens) my liners get pretty damp and soaked if the temps get warm 20+F.
Good luck!
Nylons!!! You've got to be kidding, if they don't make your feet sweat nothing will, unless you like that cold clammy feeling I would ignore that comment...
I have a locker room with a boot drying system, so I just put the boots under the air outlet and they're dry the next day. If I'm travelling, I carry cozy-toes (those 6" stick heaters mentioned earlier), and plug them in overnight. I don't pull out the liners since my boots are ready to be replaced about the same time as they start to get stinky. If I got more than 2 years from a pair of boots, I would pull the liners periodically.
post #18 of 26
Share your pain, my feet get wet, then cold due to mosture.

I have found that the smart wool hiking socks (rei,ems knock offs ok too) work best at wicking sweat away. Most of the time I have not had to change at lunch, but a spare is always helpful. Go for the "mid weight hiker" not the actual ski socks
post #19 of 26
Another vote for Anti-Perspirant + Smartwool. Works like a charm!
post #20 of 26
Thread Starter 
I will have to give the smartwool a shot! It really can't be any worse. My feet don't ever really get cold, It's just not the best feeling. It also can start to irritate your feet. Once they get wet they tend to get irritated.
So, I will give smartwool and antiperspirant a shot ... next year! I don't like the fact that ski season is about over here! That is a long wait until next ski season. Thanks again for all of your advice and thoughts.

Chrisfish
post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2-turn
Nylons!!! You've got to be kidding, if they don't make your feet sweat nothing will
Bunk. Take some time to learn about chemical properties of synthetics (nylon vs. polyester), then explore some physics (surface area and capillary action), as well as physiology and you might not claim to be the world's expert.

Nylon will NOT make your feet sweat more. The environment inside a boot is closed and it is the boot that is the insulating device. The issue is transporting moisture vapor generated by perspiration. Nylon is more hydrophilic (water retaining) than polyester (the Coolmax people spend great amounts of marketing dollars to convince us of that - and marginally it is true) however, transporting moisture is a function of the environment, surface areas, etc. A super thin layer of nylon has less surface area than a thicker weave of polyester (most wicking socks). The thicker sock will hold and transport more moisture because it has more surface area, but only to a point.

The synthetic fibers (nylon or polyester) are simply a highway that allows moisture levels to find equilibrium in the materials inside the boot shell. Basically sticking your foot in a plastic boot is like sticking it in a plastic bag. Moisture isn't going to evaporate into the atmosphere because the shell isn't particularly "breathable". No matter what the Coolmax or other "wicking" people want you to believe, there are no micro pumps inside the fibers pushing water out of your boot.

Once the water vapor travels from your foot to the dry liner, it will continue to collect in the surface area of the liner material. As it approaches the exterior of the liner, it will condense on the cold plastic and turn to water droplets, but little if any escapes from the boot. Once the liner material is sufficiently saturated, the wicking stops and whatever sock you have on your foot no longer makes a damn bit of difference.

You can try to shut the pores down in your foot and stop the water vapor from coming out (anti-antiperspirant) by using the aluminum-based product to swell the cells of the sweat duct- basically plug it up. But eventually the cells reach their capacity to hold moisture and... you're sweating again.

I wear the nylons because it is the thinnest sock I can find. I purposely have no room in my boots for a sock and would ski barefoot if it wasn't such a painful experience putting boots on and taking them off without the nylons to help ease the friction.

Manage it however you want, but if you have a large number of sweat glands in your feet and your body begins to perspire, you have a limited amount of time before you saturate the material inside your boot. Buy big cushy boots with lots of liner and wear thick socks if you want - they will absorb more moisture. However, if you ski long enough they too will become their own terrarium.
post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by medmarkco
Bunk. Take some time to learn about chemical properties of synthetics (nylon vs. polyester), then explore some physics (surface area and capillary action), as well as physiology and you might not claim to be the world's expert.

Nylon will NOT make your feet sweat more. The environment inside a boot is closed and it is the boot that is the insulating device. The issue is transporting moisture vapor generated by perspiration. Nylon is more hydrophilic (water retaining) than polyester (the Coolmax people spend great amounts of marketing dollars to convince us of that - and marginally it is true) however, transporting moisture is a function of the environment, surface areas, etc. A super thin layer of nylon has less surface area than a thicker weave of polyester (most wicking socks). The thicker sock will hold and transport more moisture because it has more surface area, but only to a point.

The synthetic fibers (nylon or polyester) are simply a highway that allows moisture levels to find equilibrium in the materials inside the boot shell. Basically sticking your foot in a plastic boot is like sticking it in a plastic bag. Moisture isn't going to evaporate into the atmosphere because the shell isn't particularly "breathable". No matter what the Coolmax or other "wicking" people want you to believe, there are no micro pumps inside the fibers pushing water out of your boot.

Once the water vapor travels from your foot to the dry liner, it will continue to collect in the surface area of the liner material. As it approaches the exterior of the liner, it will condense on the cold plastic and turn to water droplets, but little if any escapes from the boot. Once the liner material is sufficiently saturated, the wicking stops and whatever sock you have on your foot no longer makes a damn bit of difference.

You can try to shut the pores down in your foot and stop the water vapor from coming out (anti-antiperspirant) by using the aluminum-based product to swell the cells of the sweat duct- basically plug it up. But eventually the cells reach their capacity to hold moisture and... you're sweating again.

I wear the nylons because it is the thinnest sock I can find. I purposely have no room in my boots for a sock and would ski barefoot if it wasn't such a painful experience putting boots on and taking them off without the nylons to help ease the friction.

Manage it however you want, but if you have a large number of sweat glands in your feet and your body begins to perspire, you have a limited amount of time before you saturate the material inside your boot. Buy big cushy boots with lots of liner and wear thick socks if you want - they will absorb more moisture. However, if you ski long enough they too will become their own terrarium.
Where did I ever claim I was the worlds expert, I always thought you were...
(sidestepping the personal attack and getting on with the discussion)
I actually don't disagree with the most facts of your post. I do feel that wearing nylons holds moisture close to the skin, giving that oh so pleasant clammy feeling. I also know a lot of people that have reactions to nylon/rayon family of synthetics and it makes them sweat. I agree that plastic boots do not absorb sweat, but getting any of it away from the foot is a good thing in my opinion, and a lot of it ends up under the boot board.
Break down and buy ski socks, some are so thin they take up almost no volume.
post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2-turn
Where did I ever claim I was the worlds expert, I always thought you were...
(sidestepping the personal attack and getting on with the discussion)
I actually don't disagree with the most facts of your post. I do feel that wearing nylons holds moisture close to the skin, giving that oh so pleasant clammy feeling. I also know a lot of people that have reactions to nylon/rayon family of synthetics and it makes them sweat. I agree that plastic boots do not absorb sweat, but getting any of it away from the foot is a good thing in my opinion, and a lot of it ends up under the boot board.
Break down and buy ski socks, some are so thin they take up almost no volume.
Touché – should not have been so sensitive about "GOT to be kidding".


No ski socks. The nylon works too well for me - as tight and snug as anything and virtually no seam to deal with. If I do anything, I’ll put up with the struggle to get my bare foot in and out of my boot like I used to.
post #24 of 26
OK, you forced me to do it....... HERE is my solution. I used a 12v PC fan, a 12v - 1000 mw power supply from an old printer, a 12v plug fitting from R.S., a snap lock food container (don't tell my wife), some old Dirt Devil vacuum hose (also don't tell), two sink trap PVC fittings, new not used (to direct the air flow into the toe area) and some foam ear plugs to use when your friends see it! Total cost ~ $10

It all snaps together ( just cut the holes for the hose just the size of the small dia. of the corrugation), the power supply fits inside the container, and the hose, etc, goes in the boots for travel.

It will dry our soaked gloves in less than two hours and boots about the same time, it's small, and it's relatively quiet .

I'm quit sure there are more elegant solutions, but on short notice, this is the best I could do!:
post #25 of 26
Antiperspirant is an old standby

Thin liners, like coolmax (nylon/polyester in it's friendly form) works well. Either with or w/o a thin ski sock. If it's cold, go for the liner/ski sock combo.

You probably don't need to pull the liners daily inorder to dry the boots, but you may want to do it several times during the season to dry out the outside of the liner. More then a few kids on my child's ski team found mold on the outside of their liners at the end of the season. (they ski at least 5 days/week from Dec-Mar)

There are lots of good dryers out there and everyone has given great suggestions already. I like the Dry Guy Thermo for traveling. It's a little noisy, but it dries everyone's boots and gloves before bedtime. At home, I like the Peet dryer. It circulates room temp air so you can just leave the boots on it for days if you want with no harm to the boots. It also works quickly.
http://www.cabelas.com/products/Cpod0006605.jsp
post #26 of 26
Thread Starter 
Thanks again for everyone's advice. I now have good tips to implement for next season! Hope everyone had a good ending to their season. Ours is over now :

Chrisfish
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